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Development and matching of binocular orientation preference in mouse V1.

Bhaumik B, Shah NP - Front Syst Neurosci (2014)

Bottom Line: At the end of critical period 39% of cells in binocular zone in our model cortex is orientation selective.The starting and the closing time for critical period determine the orientation preference alignment between the two eyes and orientation tuning in cortical cells.It also results in much lower % of orientation selective cells in mice as compared to ferrets and cats having organized orientation maps with pinwheels.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Electrical Engineering Department, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi New Delhi, India.

ABSTRACT
Eye-specific thalamic inputs converge in the primary visual cortex (V1) and form the basis of binocular vision. For normal binocular perceptions, such as depth and stereopsis, binocularly matched orientation preference between the two eyes is required. A critical period of binocular matching of orientation preference in mice during normal development is reported in literature. Using a reaction diffusion model we present the development of RF and orientation selectivity in mouse V1 and investigate the binocular orientation preference matching during the critical period. At the onset of the critical period the preferred orientations of the modeled cells are mostly mismatched in the two eyes and the mismatch decreases and reaches levels reported in juvenile mouse by the end of the critical period. At the end of critical period 39% of cells in binocular zone in our model cortex is orientation selective. In literature around 40% cortical cells are reported as orientation selective in mouse V1. The starting and the closing time for critical period determine the orientation preference alignment between the two eyes and orientation tuning in cortical cells. The absence of near neighbor interaction among cortical cells during the development of thalamo-cortical wiring causes a salt and pepper organization in the orientation preference map in mice. It also results in much lower % of orientation selective cells in mice as compared to ferrets and cats having organized orientation maps with pinwheels.

No MeSH data available.


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HWHH histogram in model cat cortex, (A) in absence, and (B) in presence of diffusive cooperation among cortical cells.
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Figure 10: HWHH histogram in model cat cortex, (A) in absence, and (B) in presence of diffusive cooperation among cortical cells.

Mentions: Our model captures the diversity in RFs and orientation preferences (see Figure 3) in local cell population as reported in Bonin et al. (2011). The local diversity in orientation preference in mice is captured in the salt and pepper orientation maps (see Figures 6A,C). Approximately 75% of cells in adult ferret cortex (Chapman and Stryker, 1993) and about 90% of cells in adult cat cortex (Bishop and Henry, 1972) are orientation selective. In mouse V1 around 40% cells are orientation selective (Mangini and Pearlman, 1980; Metin et al., 1988; Hübener, 2003). We attribute the lower % of orientation selective cell in mice as compared to ferrets and cats to absence of diffusive cooperation between neighboring cortical cells during development. Absence of diffusive cooperation between cortical cells also causes salt and pepper orientation map in mice. To get a quantitative understanding of how diffusive cooperation among near neighbor cortical cells during development affects the % of orientation selective cells and tuning properties we studied development of orientation selectivity in our model cat cortex (Siddiqui and Bhaumik, 2011) (i) in absence, and (ii) in presence of diffusive cooperation among cortical cells. The orientation tuning histogram for the two cases are shown in Figures 10A,B, respectively. All parameters for the developing RFs in cat for Figure 10B are same as given in our earlier work (Siddiqui and Bhaumik, 2011). In absence of diffusive cooperation among cortical cells, 57.12% cells are orientation selective as compared to 84.34% when diffusive cooperation is present.


Development and matching of binocular orientation preference in mouse V1.

Bhaumik B, Shah NP - Front Syst Neurosci (2014)

HWHH histogram in model cat cortex, (A) in absence, and (B) in presence of diffusive cooperation among cortical cells.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4109519&req=5

Figure 10: HWHH histogram in model cat cortex, (A) in absence, and (B) in presence of diffusive cooperation among cortical cells.
Mentions: Our model captures the diversity in RFs and orientation preferences (see Figure 3) in local cell population as reported in Bonin et al. (2011). The local diversity in orientation preference in mice is captured in the salt and pepper orientation maps (see Figures 6A,C). Approximately 75% of cells in adult ferret cortex (Chapman and Stryker, 1993) and about 90% of cells in adult cat cortex (Bishop and Henry, 1972) are orientation selective. In mouse V1 around 40% cells are orientation selective (Mangini and Pearlman, 1980; Metin et al., 1988; Hübener, 2003). We attribute the lower % of orientation selective cell in mice as compared to ferrets and cats to absence of diffusive cooperation between neighboring cortical cells during development. Absence of diffusive cooperation between cortical cells also causes salt and pepper orientation map in mice. To get a quantitative understanding of how diffusive cooperation among near neighbor cortical cells during development affects the % of orientation selective cells and tuning properties we studied development of orientation selectivity in our model cat cortex (Siddiqui and Bhaumik, 2011) (i) in absence, and (ii) in presence of diffusive cooperation among cortical cells. The orientation tuning histogram for the two cases are shown in Figures 10A,B, respectively. All parameters for the developing RFs in cat for Figure 10B are same as given in our earlier work (Siddiqui and Bhaumik, 2011). In absence of diffusive cooperation among cortical cells, 57.12% cells are orientation selective as compared to 84.34% when diffusive cooperation is present.

Bottom Line: At the end of critical period 39% of cells in binocular zone in our model cortex is orientation selective.The starting and the closing time for critical period determine the orientation preference alignment between the two eyes and orientation tuning in cortical cells.It also results in much lower % of orientation selective cells in mice as compared to ferrets and cats having organized orientation maps with pinwheels.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Electrical Engineering Department, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi New Delhi, India.

ABSTRACT
Eye-specific thalamic inputs converge in the primary visual cortex (V1) and form the basis of binocular vision. For normal binocular perceptions, such as depth and stereopsis, binocularly matched orientation preference between the two eyes is required. A critical period of binocular matching of orientation preference in mice during normal development is reported in literature. Using a reaction diffusion model we present the development of RF and orientation selectivity in mouse V1 and investigate the binocular orientation preference matching during the critical period. At the onset of the critical period the preferred orientations of the modeled cells are mostly mismatched in the two eyes and the mismatch decreases and reaches levels reported in juvenile mouse by the end of the critical period. At the end of critical period 39% of cells in binocular zone in our model cortex is orientation selective. In literature around 40% cortical cells are reported as orientation selective in mouse V1. The starting and the closing time for critical period determine the orientation preference alignment between the two eyes and orientation tuning in cortical cells. The absence of near neighbor interaction among cortical cells during the development of thalamo-cortical wiring causes a salt and pepper organization in the orientation preference map in mice. It also results in much lower % of orientation selective cells in mice as compared to ferrets and cats having organized orientation maps with pinwheels.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus