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Development and matching of binocular orientation preference in mouse V1.

Bhaumik B, Shah NP - Front Syst Neurosci (2014)

Bottom Line: At the end of critical period 39% of cells in binocular zone in our model cortex is orientation selective.The starting and the closing time for critical period determine the orientation preference alignment between the two eyes and orientation tuning in cortical cells.It also results in much lower % of orientation selective cells in mice as compared to ferrets and cats having organized orientation maps with pinwheels.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Electrical Engineering Department, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi New Delhi, India.

ABSTRACT
Eye-specific thalamic inputs converge in the primary visual cortex (V1) and form the basis of binocular vision. For normal binocular perceptions, such as depth and stereopsis, binocularly matched orientation preference between the two eyes is required. A critical period of binocular matching of orientation preference in mice during normal development is reported in literature. Using a reaction diffusion model we present the development of RF and orientation selectivity in mouse V1 and investigate the binocular orientation preference matching during the critical period. At the onset of the critical period the preferred orientations of the modeled cells are mostly mismatched in the two eyes and the mismatch decreases and reaches levels reported in juvenile mouse by the end of the critical period. At the end of critical period 39% of cells in binocular zone in our model cortex is orientation selective. In literature around 40% cortical cells are reported as orientation selective in mouse V1. The starting and the closing time for critical period determine the orientation preference alignment between the two eyes and orientation tuning in cortical cells. The absence of near neighbor interaction among cortical cells during the development of thalamo-cortical wiring causes a salt and pepper organization in the orientation preference map in mice. It also results in much lower % of orientation selective cells in mice as compared to ferrets and cats having organized orientation maps with pinwheels.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) The effect of extending the duration of critical period on RFs. The left eye and the right eye specific RFs for some sample cells are shown. The RFs shown on the left of the figure are for the left eye and those shown on the right are for the right eye. (B) The change in overall matching index for three different values of C-iter—500, 1500, and 2500 epochs, respectively.
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Figure 9: (A) The effect of extending the duration of critical period on RFs. The left eye and the right eye specific RFs for some sample cells are shown. The RFs shown on the left of the figure are for the left eye and those shown on the right are for the right eye. (B) The change in overall matching index for three different values of C-iter—500, 1500, and 2500 epochs, respectively.

Mentions: In the result presented in this paper 3000 epochs is taken as the time for end of critical period. To study the effect of extending the duration of critical period on RFs, we carried on synaptic weight development for different values of tc, ranging from 3000 epoch to 70,000 epoch. Figure 9A shows left and right eye RF for some sample cells from the model cortex for differenr values of tc. For larger values of tc, the diffusion continues for longer time and the sub-field structure of the receptive fields is lost. Consequently orientation selectivity is also lost. The critical period of plasticity in layer IV in mouse is shorter than that in layer II/III (Jiang et al., 2007). Our study shows that a critical period beyond 2500–3000 epoch in layer IV causes loss in orientation selectivity.


Development and matching of binocular orientation preference in mouse V1.

Bhaumik B, Shah NP - Front Syst Neurosci (2014)

(A) The effect of extending the duration of critical period on RFs. The left eye and the right eye specific RFs for some sample cells are shown. The RFs shown on the left of the figure are for the left eye and those shown on the right are for the right eye. (B) The change in overall matching index for three different values of C-iter—500, 1500, and 2500 epochs, respectively.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4109519&req=5

Figure 9: (A) The effect of extending the duration of critical period on RFs. The left eye and the right eye specific RFs for some sample cells are shown. The RFs shown on the left of the figure are for the left eye and those shown on the right are for the right eye. (B) The change in overall matching index for three different values of C-iter—500, 1500, and 2500 epochs, respectively.
Mentions: In the result presented in this paper 3000 epochs is taken as the time for end of critical period. To study the effect of extending the duration of critical period on RFs, we carried on synaptic weight development for different values of tc, ranging from 3000 epoch to 70,000 epoch. Figure 9A shows left and right eye RF for some sample cells from the model cortex for differenr values of tc. For larger values of tc, the diffusion continues for longer time and the sub-field structure of the receptive fields is lost. Consequently orientation selectivity is also lost. The critical period of plasticity in layer IV in mouse is shorter than that in layer II/III (Jiang et al., 2007). Our study shows that a critical period beyond 2500–3000 epoch in layer IV causes loss in orientation selectivity.

Bottom Line: At the end of critical period 39% of cells in binocular zone in our model cortex is orientation selective.The starting and the closing time for critical period determine the orientation preference alignment between the two eyes and orientation tuning in cortical cells.It also results in much lower % of orientation selective cells in mice as compared to ferrets and cats having organized orientation maps with pinwheels.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Electrical Engineering Department, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi New Delhi, India.

ABSTRACT
Eye-specific thalamic inputs converge in the primary visual cortex (V1) and form the basis of binocular vision. For normal binocular perceptions, such as depth and stereopsis, binocularly matched orientation preference between the two eyes is required. A critical period of binocular matching of orientation preference in mice during normal development is reported in literature. Using a reaction diffusion model we present the development of RF and orientation selectivity in mouse V1 and investigate the binocular orientation preference matching during the critical period. At the onset of the critical period the preferred orientations of the modeled cells are mostly mismatched in the two eyes and the mismatch decreases and reaches levels reported in juvenile mouse by the end of the critical period. At the end of critical period 39% of cells in binocular zone in our model cortex is orientation selective. In literature around 40% cortical cells are reported as orientation selective in mouse V1. The starting and the closing time for critical period determine the orientation preference alignment between the two eyes and orientation tuning in cortical cells. The absence of near neighbor interaction among cortical cells during the development of thalamo-cortical wiring causes a salt and pepper organization in the orientation preference map in mice. It also results in much lower % of orientation selective cells in mice as compared to ferrets and cats having organized orientation maps with pinwheels.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus