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Diversity and altitudinal distribution of Chrysomelidae (Coleoptera) in Peregrina Canyon, Tamaulipas, Mexico.

Sánchez-Reyes UJ, Niño-Maldonado S, Jones RW - Zookeys (2014)

Bottom Line: Similarity values were less than 50% among the three sites indicating that each site had distinct species assemblages of Chrysomelidae.The highest abundance was obtained during the late dry season, whereas diversity indices were highest during the early wet season.These results highlight the importance of conservation of this heterogeneous habitat and establish baseline data for Chrysomelidae richness and diversity for the region.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: División de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigación. Instituto Tecnológico de Cd. Victoria. Boulevard Emilio Portes Gil No.1301, C.P. 87010. Ciudad Victoria, Tamaulipas, México.

ABSTRACT
The Chrysomelidae (Coleoptera) is a highly speciose family that has been poorly studied at the regional level in Mexico. In the present study, we estimated species richness and diversity in oak-pine forest, Tamaulipan thorny scrub and in tropical deciduous forests in Peregrina Canyon within the Altas Cumbres Protected Area of the northeastern state of Tamaulipas, Mexico. Sampling of Chrysomelidae consisted of five sweep net samples (200 net sweeps) within each of three sites during four sample periods: early dry season, late dry season, early wet season, and late wet season. Species were identified and total numbers per species were recorded for each sample. A total of 2,226 specimens were collected belonging to six subfamilies, 81 genera and 157 species of Chrysomelidae from the study area. Galerucinae was the most abundant subfamily with 1,828 specimens, representing 82.1% of total abundance in the study area. Lower abundance was recorded in Cassidinae (8.5%), Eumolpinae (3.6%), Cryptocephalinae (2.2%), Chrysomelinae (2.2%), and finally Criocerinae (1.3%). The highest species richness was also presented in the subfamily Galerucinae with 49% of the total obtained species followed by Cassidinae (20%), Cryptocephalinae (9.7%), Eumolpinae (9.7%), Chrysomelinae (6.5%) and Criocerinae (5.2%). The most common species were Centralaphthona fulvipennis Jacoby (412 individuals), Centralaphthona diversa (Baly) (248), Margaridisa sp.1 (219), Acallepitrix sp.1 (134), Longitarsus sp.1 (104), Heterispa vinula (Erichson) (91), Epitrix sp.1 (84) and Chaetocnema sp.1 (72). Twenty-two species were doubletons (1.97% of total abundance) and 52 were singletons (2.33%). The estimated overall density value obtained was 0.0037 individuals/m2. The greatest abundance and density of individuals were recorded at the lowest elevation site. However, alpha diversity increased with increasing altitude. Similarity values were less than 50% among the three sites indicating that each site had distinct species assemblages of Chrysomelidae. The highest abundance was obtained during the late dry season, whereas diversity indices were highest during the early wet season. The present work represents the first report of the altitudinal variation in richness, abundance, and diversity of Chrysomelidae in Mexico. These results highlight the importance of conservation of this heterogeneous habitat and establish baseline data for Chrysomelidae richness and diversity for the region.

No MeSH data available.


Cluster analysis from seasons in the Peregrina Canyon, Tamaulipas, Mexico.
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Figure 8: Cluster analysis from seasons in the Peregrina Canyon, Tamaulipas, Mexico.

Mentions: In contrast to abundance, the Shannon and Simpson indices indicated the highest diversity during the early wet season. Lower values ​​of diversity occurred in late dry season, followed by late wet and early dry seasons. Based on diversity indices, all seasons were statistically different (p < 0.05) (Table 2). Reduction in diversity value at early dry season was originated by the drop in evenness with the increase of samples. The rest of year, evenness values, remained constant with the increase of samples in each season (Figure 7). Of the total species recorded in the annual period, only 13 were present throughout the year, and 23 were registered in three seasons, 37 in only two, and 84 were unique to a single season. From these exclusive species, 38 were recorded in late dry season, 26 in early wet season, 12 in late wet season, and only eight in early dry season (Table 1). Bray Curtis index established the greatest similarity between early and late dry seasons (45.1%), and in descending order were presented late wet and early dry seasons (38.8%), late dry and late wet seasons (37.9%), late dry and early wet seasons (36.3%), early and late wet seasons (35.6%) and early wet and early dry seasons (25.7%). The cluster analysis showed the formation of three groups according to the composition of species in each season: the first group consists of the species present in early and late dry seasons, the second group corresponds to late wet season species, and the last group was the early wet season species (Figure 8).


Diversity and altitudinal distribution of Chrysomelidae (Coleoptera) in Peregrina Canyon, Tamaulipas, Mexico.

Sánchez-Reyes UJ, Niño-Maldonado S, Jones RW - Zookeys (2014)

Cluster analysis from seasons in the Peregrina Canyon, Tamaulipas, Mexico.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons-attribution
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4109465&req=5

Figure 8: Cluster analysis from seasons in the Peregrina Canyon, Tamaulipas, Mexico.
Mentions: In contrast to abundance, the Shannon and Simpson indices indicated the highest diversity during the early wet season. Lower values ​​of diversity occurred in late dry season, followed by late wet and early dry seasons. Based on diversity indices, all seasons were statistically different (p < 0.05) (Table 2). Reduction in diversity value at early dry season was originated by the drop in evenness with the increase of samples. The rest of year, evenness values, remained constant with the increase of samples in each season (Figure 7). Of the total species recorded in the annual period, only 13 were present throughout the year, and 23 were registered in three seasons, 37 in only two, and 84 were unique to a single season. From these exclusive species, 38 were recorded in late dry season, 26 in early wet season, 12 in late wet season, and only eight in early dry season (Table 1). Bray Curtis index established the greatest similarity between early and late dry seasons (45.1%), and in descending order were presented late wet and early dry seasons (38.8%), late dry and late wet seasons (37.9%), late dry and early wet seasons (36.3%), early and late wet seasons (35.6%) and early wet and early dry seasons (25.7%). The cluster analysis showed the formation of three groups according to the composition of species in each season: the first group consists of the species present in early and late dry seasons, the second group corresponds to late wet season species, and the last group was the early wet season species (Figure 8).

Bottom Line: Similarity values were less than 50% among the three sites indicating that each site had distinct species assemblages of Chrysomelidae.The highest abundance was obtained during the late dry season, whereas diversity indices were highest during the early wet season.These results highlight the importance of conservation of this heterogeneous habitat and establish baseline data for Chrysomelidae richness and diversity for the region.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: División de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigación. Instituto Tecnológico de Cd. Victoria. Boulevard Emilio Portes Gil No.1301, C.P. 87010. Ciudad Victoria, Tamaulipas, México.

ABSTRACT
The Chrysomelidae (Coleoptera) is a highly speciose family that has been poorly studied at the regional level in Mexico. In the present study, we estimated species richness and diversity in oak-pine forest, Tamaulipan thorny scrub and in tropical deciduous forests in Peregrina Canyon within the Altas Cumbres Protected Area of the northeastern state of Tamaulipas, Mexico. Sampling of Chrysomelidae consisted of five sweep net samples (200 net sweeps) within each of three sites during four sample periods: early dry season, late dry season, early wet season, and late wet season. Species were identified and total numbers per species were recorded for each sample. A total of 2,226 specimens were collected belonging to six subfamilies, 81 genera and 157 species of Chrysomelidae from the study area. Galerucinae was the most abundant subfamily with 1,828 specimens, representing 82.1% of total abundance in the study area. Lower abundance was recorded in Cassidinae (8.5%), Eumolpinae (3.6%), Cryptocephalinae (2.2%), Chrysomelinae (2.2%), and finally Criocerinae (1.3%). The highest species richness was also presented in the subfamily Galerucinae with 49% of the total obtained species followed by Cassidinae (20%), Cryptocephalinae (9.7%), Eumolpinae (9.7%), Chrysomelinae (6.5%) and Criocerinae (5.2%). The most common species were Centralaphthona fulvipennis Jacoby (412 individuals), Centralaphthona diversa (Baly) (248), Margaridisa sp.1 (219), Acallepitrix sp.1 (134), Longitarsus sp.1 (104), Heterispa vinula (Erichson) (91), Epitrix sp.1 (84) and Chaetocnema sp.1 (72). Twenty-two species were doubletons (1.97% of total abundance) and 52 were singletons (2.33%). The estimated overall density value obtained was 0.0037 individuals/m2. The greatest abundance and density of individuals were recorded at the lowest elevation site. However, alpha diversity increased with increasing altitude. Similarity values were less than 50% among the three sites indicating that each site had distinct species assemblages of Chrysomelidae. The highest abundance was obtained during the late dry season, whereas diversity indices were highest during the early wet season. The present work represents the first report of the altitudinal variation in richness, abundance, and diversity of Chrysomelidae in Mexico. These results highlight the importance of conservation of this heterogeneous habitat and establish baseline data for Chrysomelidae richness and diversity for the region.

No MeSH data available.