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Genetics and shell morphometrics of assimineids (Mollusca, Caenogastropoda, Truncatelloidea) in the St Lucia Estuary, South Africa.

Miranda NA, van Rooyen R, MacDonald A, Ponder W, Perissinotto R - Zookeys (2014)

Bottom Line: The Assimineidae are a family of amphibious microgastropods that can be mostly found in estuaries and mangroves in South Africa.These two taxa exhibit patterns of spatial overlap that appear to vary depending on environmental parameters, particularly salinity.The need to resolve the complex taxonomy of assimineids is highlighted.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: DST/NRF Research Chair in Shallow Water Ecosystems, c/o Department of Zoology, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P O Box 77000, Port Elizabeth, 6031, South Africa.

ABSTRACT
The Assimineidae are a family of amphibious microgastropods that can be mostly found in estuaries and mangroves in South Africa. These snails often occur in great numbers and are ecologically important to the St Lucia Estuary, which forms a crucial part of the iSimangaliso Wetland Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Genetic and shell morphometric analyses were conducted on individuals collected from nine localities distributed from the northern lake regions to the southern lake and the mouth of the St Lucia estuarine lake. Mitochondrial (COI) and nuclear (28S) DNA was used to construct Bayesian Inference, Neighbour-joining, Maximum Parsimony and Maximum Likelihood trees. Principal Component Analysis and Cluster Analysis were performed on standard shell parameter data. Results indicate that two different taxa are present in St Lucia. The taxon comprising individuals from the South Lake and St Lucia Estuary Mouth is identified as Assiminea cf. capensis Bartsch, in accordance with the latest taxonomic consensus. The taxon comprising assimineid individuals from False Bay, North Lake and South Lake, is here tentatively named "Assiminea" aff. capensis (Sowerby). These two taxa exhibit patterns of spatial overlap that appear to vary depending on environmental parameters, particularly salinity. The need to resolve the complex taxonomy of assimineids is highlighted.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Plot of first two principal components of PCA for morphometric data. The cluster analysis ellipses are associated with P = 0.001.
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Figure 4: Plot of first two principal components of PCA for morphometric data. The cluster analysis ellipses are associated with P = 0.001.

Mentions: Morphometric analysis. Generally larger shell sizes (SH, SW, BWH, AH and AW) were recorded for Assiminea cf. capensis Bartsch in comparison to “Assiminea” aff. capensis (Sowerby) (Table 3). Adult Assiminea cf. capensis also tended to have a greater number of whorls (Whorl) (Table 3). However, the Assiminea cf. capensis populations from Back Channel, Charter’s Creek and Catalina Bay were grouped separately from the “Assiminea” aff. capensis populations at Lister’s Point, Hell’s Gate, Fani’s Island, Charter’s Creek and Catalina Bay, on the basis of shell morphometry in the cluster analysis (Fig. 4). The first two principal components (PCs) accounted for 89.1% of the total variation in shell morphometry (Table 4). All the shell dimensions recorded loaded high in PC1 and the ratios loaded high in PC2. This would suggest that samples are separated primarily on the basis of size (PC1) and shape (PC2).


Genetics and shell morphometrics of assimineids (Mollusca, Caenogastropoda, Truncatelloidea) in the St Lucia Estuary, South Africa.

Miranda NA, van Rooyen R, MacDonald A, Ponder W, Perissinotto R - Zookeys (2014)

Plot of first two principal components of PCA for morphometric data. The cluster analysis ellipses are associated with P = 0.001.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons-attribution
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4109452&req=5

Figure 4: Plot of first two principal components of PCA for morphometric data. The cluster analysis ellipses are associated with P = 0.001.
Mentions: Morphometric analysis. Generally larger shell sizes (SH, SW, BWH, AH and AW) were recorded for Assiminea cf. capensis Bartsch in comparison to “Assiminea” aff. capensis (Sowerby) (Table 3). Adult Assiminea cf. capensis also tended to have a greater number of whorls (Whorl) (Table 3). However, the Assiminea cf. capensis populations from Back Channel, Charter’s Creek and Catalina Bay were grouped separately from the “Assiminea” aff. capensis populations at Lister’s Point, Hell’s Gate, Fani’s Island, Charter’s Creek and Catalina Bay, on the basis of shell morphometry in the cluster analysis (Fig. 4). The first two principal components (PCs) accounted for 89.1% of the total variation in shell morphometry (Table 4). All the shell dimensions recorded loaded high in PC1 and the ratios loaded high in PC2. This would suggest that samples are separated primarily on the basis of size (PC1) and shape (PC2).

Bottom Line: The Assimineidae are a family of amphibious microgastropods that can be mostly found in estuaries and mangroves in South Africa.These two taxa exhibit patterns of spatial overlap that appear to vary depending on environmental parameters, particularly salinity.The need to resolve the complex taxonomy of assimineids is highlighted.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: DST/NRF Research Chair in Shallow Water Ecosystems, c/o Department of Zoology, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P O Box 77000, Port Elizabeth, 6031, South Africa.

ABSTRACT
The Assimineidae are a family of amphibious microgastropods that can be mostly found in estuaries and mangroves in South Africa. These snails often occur in great numbers and are ecologically important to the St Lucia Estuary, which forms a crucial part of the iSimangaliso Wetland Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Genetic and shell morphometric analyses were conducted on individuals collected from nine localities distributed from the northern lake regions to the southern lake and the mouth of the St Lucia estuarine lake. Mitochondrial (COI) and nuclear (28S) DNA was used to construct Bayesian Inference, Neighbour-joining, Maximum Parsimony and Maximum Likelihood trees. Principal Component Analysis and Cluster Analysis were performed on standard shell parameter data. Results indicate that two different taxa are present in St Lucia. The taxon comprising individuals from the South Lake and St Lucia Estuary Mouth is identified as Assiminea cf. capensis Bartsch, in accordance with the latest taxonomic consensus. The taxon comprising assimineid individuals from False Bay, North Lake and South Lake, is here tentatively named "Assiminea" aff. capensis (Sowerby). These two taxa exhibit patterns of spatial overlap that appear to vary depending on environmental parameters, particularly salinity. The need to resolve the complex taxonomy of assimineids is highlighted.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus