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Ecological biogeography of the terrestrial nematodes of victoria land, antarctica.

Adams BJ, Wall DH, Virginia RA, Broos E, Knox MA - Zookeys (2014)

Bottom Line: Nematodes are the most commonly encountered and abundant metazoans of Victoria Land soils, yet little is known of their diversity and distribution.However, at smaller spatial scales, populations can have patchy distributions, with the presence or absence of each species strongly influenced by specific habitat requirements.As the frequency of nematode introductions to Antarctica increases, and soil habitats are altered in response to climate change, our current understanding of the environmental parameters associated with the biogeography of Antarctic nematofauna will be crucial to monitoring and possibly mitigating changes to these unique soil ecosystems.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, and Evolutionary Ecology Laboratories, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602.

ABSTRACT
The terrestrial ecosystems of Victoria Land, Antarctica are characteristically simple in terms of biological diversity and ecological functioning. Nematodes are the most commonly encountered and abundant metazoans of Victoria Land soils, yet little is known of their diversity and distribution. Herein we present a summary of the geographic distribution, habitats and ecology of the terrestrial nematodes of Victoria Land from published and unpublished sources. All Victoria Land nematodes are endemic to Antarctica, and many are common and widely distributed at landscape scales. However, at smaller spatial scales, populations can have patchy distributions, with the presence or absence of each species strongly influenced by specific habitat requirements. As the frequency of nematode introductions to Antarctica increases, and soil habitats are altered in response to climate change, our current understanding of the environmental parameters associated with the biogeography of Antarctic nematofauna will be crucial to monitoring and possibly mitigating changes to these unique soil ecosystems.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. Labeled areas represent study locations and major geographic features referenced in the tables and text.
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Figure 2: McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. Labeled areas represent study locations and major geographic features referenced in the tables and text.

Mentions: Regional to continental-scale descriptions of the Antarctic nematofauna have pointed to a paucity of distributional records for much of the continent (Andrássy 1998; Velasco-Castrillón and Stevens 2014). Amongst all regions of Antarctica, Victoria Land is arguably the most intensively studied (Adams et al. 2006). Victoria Land is “ that part of Antarctica which fronts on the western side of the Ross Sea, extending southward from about 70°30'S to 78°00'S, and westward from the Ross Sea to the edge of the polar plateau” (USGS 2003). Here, we synthesize information on the nematode biodiversity, geographic distribution and soil and sediment habitats of the terrestrial nematodes in Victoria Land, Antarctica. Much of this information comes from a series of studies to assess nematode diversity and distribution begun in austral summer 1989–1990 by Wall (formerly Freckman) and Virginia and extending to the present as part of the McMurdo Dry Valley Long Term Ecological Research program funded by the US National Science Foundation (www.mcmlter.org). We report on findings of these studies through 2004 which captures most of the biodiversity information gathered by this research group, whereas more recent research has focused on nematode species response to climate change and soil resource manipulations (Ayres et al. 2010; Doran et al. 2002; Simmons et al. 2009). For purposes of our synthesis, we define two areas, Northern Victoria Land - the area from about 70°30'S to about 76°S, encompassing Terra Nova Bay, Edmonson Point and Cape Hallett (Figure 1); and Southern Victoria Land - the area from about 76°S to about 78°S including all of the McMurdo Dry Valleys and nearby coastal regions (Adams et al. 2006) (Figure 2).


Ecological biogeography of the terrestrial nematodes of victoria land, antarctica.

Adams BJ, Wall DH, Virginia RA, Broos E, Knox MA - Zookeys (2014)

McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. Labeled areas represent study locations and major geographic features referenced in the tables and text.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons-attribution
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4109451&req=5

Figure 2: McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. Labeled areas represent study locations and major geographic features referenced in the tables and text.
Mentions: Regional to continental-scale descriptions of the Antarctic nematofauna have pointed to a paucity of distributional records for much of the continent (Andrássy 1998; Velasco-Castrillón and Stevens 2014). Amongst all regions of Antarctica, Victoria Land is arguably the most intensively studied (Adams et al. 2006). Victoria Land is “ that part of Antarctica which fronts on the western side of the Ross Sea, extending southward from about 70°30'S to 78°00'S, and westward from the Ross Sea to the edge of the polar plateau” (USGS 2003). Here, we synthesize information on the nematode biodiversity, geographic distribution and soil and sediment habitats of the terrestrial nematodes in Victoria Land, Antarctica. Much of this information comes from a series of studies to assess nematode diversity and distribution begun in austral summer 1989–1990 by Wall (formerly Freckman) and Virginia and extending to the present as part of the McMurdo Dry Valley Long Term Ecological Research program funded by the US National Science Foundation (www.mcmlter.org). We report on findings of these studies through 2004 which captures most of the biodiversity information gathered by this research group, whereas more recent research has focused on nematode species response to climate change and soil resource manipulations (Ayres et al. 2010; Doran et al. 2002; Simmons et al. 2009). For purposes of our synthesis, we define two areas, Northern Victoria Land - the area from about 70°30'S to about 76°S, encompassing Terra Nova Bay, Edmonson Point and Cape Hallett (Figure 1); and Southern Victoria Land - the area from about 76°S to about 78°S including all of the McMurdo Dry Valleys and nearby coastal regions (Adams et al. 2006) (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: Nematodes are the most commonly encountered and abundant metazoans of Victoria Land soils, yet little is known of their diversity and distribution.However, at smaller spatial scales, populations can have patchy distributions, with the presence or absence of each species strongly influenced by specific habitat requirements.As the frequency of nematode introductions to Antarctica increases, and soil habitats are altered in response to climate change, our current understanding of the environmental parameters associated with the biogeography of Antarctic nematofauna will be crucial to monitoring and possibly mitigating changes to these unique soil ecosystems.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, and Evolutionary Ecology Laboratories, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602.

ABSTRACT
The terrestrial ecosystems of Victoria Land, Antarctica are characteristically simple in terms of biological diversity and ecological functioning. Nematodes are the most commonly encountered and abundant metazoans of Victoria Land soils, yet little is known of their diversity and distribution. Herein we present a summary of the geographic distribution, habitats and ecology of the terrestrial nematodes of Victoria Land from published and unpublished sources. All Victoria Land nematodes are endemic to Antarctica, and many are common and widely distributed at landscape scales. However, at smaller spatial scales, populations can have patchy distributions, with the presence or absence of each species strongly influenced by specific habitat requirements. As the frequency of nematode introductions to Antarctica increases, and soil habitats are altered in response to climate change, our current understanding of the environmental parameters associated with the biogeography of Antarctic nematofauna will be crucial to monitoring and possibly mitigating changes to these unique soil ecosystems.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus