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Target identification strategies in plant chemical biology.

Dejonghe W, Russinova E - Front Plant Sci (2014)

Bottom Line: The current needs to understand gene function in plant biology increasingly require more dynamic and conditional approaches opposed to classic genetic strategies.Gene redundancy and lethality can substantially complicate research, which might be solved by applying a chemical genetics approach.Now understood as the study of small molecules and their effect on biological systems with subsequent target identification, chemical genetics is a fast developing field with a strong history in pharmaceutical research and drug discovery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant Systems Biology, VIB Ghent, Belgium ; Department of Plant Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, Ghent University Ghent, Belgium.

ABSTRACT
The current needs to understand gene function in plant biology increasingly require more dynamic and conditional approaches opposed to classic genetic strategies. Gene redundancy and lethality can substantially complicate research, which might be solved by applying a chemical genetics approach. Now understood as the study of small molecules and their effect on biological systems with subsequent target identification, chemical genetics is a fast developing field with a strong history in pharmaceutical research and drug discovery. In plant biology however, chemical genetics is still largely in the starting blocks, with most studies relying on forward genetics and phenotypic analysis for target identification, whereas studies including direct target identification are limited. Here, we provide an overview of recent advances in chemical genetics in plant biology with a focus on target identification. Furthermore, we discuss different strategies for direct target identification and the possibilities and challenges for plant biology.

No MeSH data available.


Schematic representation of target identification strategies. Target identification strategies are represented in function of their ability to identify only one target or several targets (interactome), and the potential to identify non-specific interactors (such as proteins that will confer resistance or induce the appropriate readout without actually binding specifically the small molecule).
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Figure 1: Schematic representation of target identification strategies. Target identification strategies are represented in function of their ability to identify only one target or several targets (interactome), and the potential to identify non-specific interactors (such as proteins that will confer resistance or induce the appropriate readout without actually binding specifically the small molecule).

Mentions: An important aspect of chemical biology is linking the induced phenotype to one or more targets (Figure 1). Usually, only the relevant target, or target with the highest affinity for the small molecule, is identified and validated, although so-called “off-targets” might contribute substantially to the overall phenotype. Therefore, it has become increasingly important to understand and generate the small molecule interactome, in order to explain the observed phenotypes (Lounkine et al., 2012). This aspect is especially important for small molecules with a commercial application in healthcare or agriculture.


Target identification strategies in plant chemical biology.

Dejonghe W, Russinova E - Front Plant Sci (2014)

Schematic representation of target identification strategies. Target identification strategies are represented in function of their ability to identify only one target or several targets (interactome), and the potential to identify non-specific interactors (such as proteins that will confer resistance or induce the appropriate readout without actually binding specifically the small molecule).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4109434&req=5

Figure 1: Schematic representation of target identification strategies. Target identification strategies are represented in function of their ability to identify only one target or several targets (interactome), and the potential to identify non-specific interactors (such as proteins that will confer resistance or induce the appropriate readout without actually binding specifically the small molecule).
Mentions: An important aspect of chemical biology is linking the induced phenotype to one or more targets (Figure 1). Usually, only the relevant target, or target with the highest affinity for the small molecule, is identified and validated, although so-called “off-targets” might contribute substantially to the overall phenotype. Therefore, it has become increasingly important to understand and generate the small molecule interactome, in order to explain the observed phenotypes (Lounkine et al., 2012). This aspect is especially important for small molecules with a commercial application in healthcare or agriculture.

Bottom Line: The current needs to understand gene function in plant biology increasingly require more dynamic and conditional approaches opposed to classic genetic strategies.Gene redundancy and lethality can substantially complicate research, which might be solved by applying a chemical genetics approach.Now understood as the study of small molecules and their effect on biological systems with subsequent target identification, chemical genetics is a fast developing field with a strong history in pharmaceutical research and drug discovery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant Systems Biology, VIB Ghent, Belgium ; Department of Plant Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, Ghent University Ghent, Belgium.

ABSTRACT
The current needs to understand gene function in plant biology increasingly require more dynamic and conditional approaches opposed to classic genetic strategies. Gene redundancy and lethality can substantially complicate research, which might be solved by applying a chemical genetics approach. Now understood as the study of small molecules and their effect on biological systems with subsequent target identification, chemical genetics is a fast developing field with a strong history in pharmaceutical research and drug discovery. In plant biology however, chemical genetics is still largely in the starting blocks, with most studies relying on forward genetics and phenotypic analysis for target identification, whereas studies including direct target identification are limited. Here, we provide an overview of recent advances in chemical genetics in plant biology with a focus on target identification. Furthermore, we discuss different strategies for direct target identification and the possibilities and challenges for plant biology.

No MeSH data available.