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Potential use of halophytes to remediate saline soils.

Hasanuzzaman M, Nahar K, Alam MM, Bhowmik PC, Hossain MA, Rahman MM, Prasad MN, Ozturk M, Fujita M - Biomed Res Int (2014)

Bottom Line: The first is cost- and labor-intensive and needs some developmental strategies for implication; on the contrary, the phytoremediation by halophyte is more suitable as it can be executed very easily without those problems.Several halophyte species including grasses, shrubs, and trees can remove the salt from different kinds of salt-affected problematic soils through salt excluding, excreting, or accumulating by their morphological, anatomical, physiological adaptation in their organelle level and cellular level.Exploiting halophytes for reducing salinity can be good sources for meeting the basic needs of people in salt-affected areas as well.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Agronomy, Faculty of Agriculture, Sher-e-Bangla Agricultural University, Sher-e-Bangla Nagar, Dhaka 1207, Bangladesh.

ABSTRACT
Salinity is one of the rising problems causing tremendous yield losses in many regions of the world especially in arid and semiarid regions. To maximize crop productivity, these areas should be brought under utilization where there are options for removing salinity or using the salt-tolerant crops. Use of salt-tolerant crops does not remove the salt and hence halophytes that have capacity to accumulate and exclude the salt can be an effective way. Methods for salt removal include agronomic practices or phytoremediation. The first is cost- and labor-intensive and needs some developmental strategies for implication; on the contrary, the phytoremediation by halophyte is more suitable as it can be executed very easily without those problems. Several halophyte species including grasses, shrubs, and trees can remove the salt from different kinds of salt-affected problematic soils through salt excluding, excreting, or accumulating by their morphological, anatomical, physiological adaptation in their organelle level and cellular level. Exploiting halophytes for reducing salinity can be good sources for meeting the basic needs of people in salt-affected areas as well. This review focuses on the special adaptive features of halophytic plants under saline condition and the possible ways to utilize these plants to remediate salinity.

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List of major halophytes discussed in this paper. (a) Mesembryanthemum crystallinum, (b) Suaeda australis, (c) Chenopodium album, (d) Salsola vermiculata, (e) Sarcocornia quinqueflora, (f) Portulaca oleracea, (g) Atriplex spp., (h) Allenrolfea occidentalis, (i) Tetragonia tetragonioides, (j) Salicornia europaea, (k) Sesuvium portulacastrum, (l) Crambe maritima, (m) Glycyrrhiza glabra, (n) Distichlis spicata, (o) Sporobolus virginicus, (p) Bruguiera gymnorrhiza, (q) Aegiceras corniculatum, (r) Sonneratia apetala, (s) Avicennia marina, (t) Rhizophora mucronata, (u) Plantago media, and (v) Suaeda maritima.
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fig1: List of major halophytes discussed in this paper. (a) Mesembryanthemum crystallinum, (b) Suaeda australis, (c) Chenopodium album, (d) Salsola vermiculata, (e) Sarcocornia quinqueflora, (f) Portulaca oleracea, (g) Atriplex spp., (h) Allenrolfea occidentalis, (i) Tetragonia tetragonioides, (j) Salicornia europaea, (k) Sesuvium portulacastrum, (l) Crambe maritima, (m) Glycyrrhiza glabra, (n) Distichlis spicata, (o) Sporobolus virginicus, (p) Bruguiera gymnorrhiza, (q) Aegiceras corniculatum, (r) Sonneratia apetala, (s) Avicennia marina, (t) Rhizophora mucronata, (u) Plantago media, and (v) Suaeda maritima.

Mentions: Halophytes are defined in different ways by many scientists based on different criteria. Schimper [18] defined halophytes as the plants capable of normal growth in saline habitats and also able to thrive on “ordinary” soil. According to Stocker [19], they are plants which can tolerate salt concentrations over 0.5% at any stage of life. More simply, Dansereau [20] mentioned that plants which grow exclusively on saline soil are halophytes. Greenway and Munns [21] defined halophytes as follows: “a kind of native flora of saline soils, which contain solutions with a Psi of at least 3.3 bar, being equivalent to 70 mM monovalent salts.” Plants that cannot survive in these habitats are classified as nonhalophytes. Unquestionably, this definition is not quite complete since there is a continuum from the least to the most salt-tolerant species. Some nonhalophytes can also survive in this kind of habitat and complete their life cycle, for example, sugar beet [22]. Some of the major halophytes are listed in Figure 1.


Potential use of halophytes to remediate saline soils.

Hasanuzzaman M, Nahar K, Alam MM, Bhowmik PC, Hossain MA, Rahman MM, Prasad MN, Ozturk M, Fujita M - Biomed Res Int (2014)

List of major halophytes discussed in this paper. (a) Mesembryanthemum crystallinum, (b) Suaeda australis, (c) Chenopodium album, (d) Salsola vermiculata, (e) Sarcocornia quinqueflora, (f) Portulaca oleracea, (g) Atriplex spp., (h) Allenrolfea occidentalis, (i) Tetragonia tetragonioides, (j) Salicornia europaea, (k) Sesuvium portulacastrum, (l) Crambe maritima, (m) Glycyrrhiza glabra, (n) Distichlis spicata, (o) Sporobolus virginicus, (p) Bruguiera gymnorrhiza, (q) Aegiceras corniculatum, (r) Sonneratia apetala, (s) Avicennia marina, (t) Rhizophora mucronata, (u) Plantago media, and (v) Suaeda maritima.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4109415&req=5

fig1: List of major halophytes discussed in this paper. (a) Mesembryanthemum crystallinum, (b) Suaeda australis, (c) Chenopodium album, (d) Salsola vermiculata, (e) Sarcocornia quinqueflora, (f) Portulaca oleracea, (g) Atriplex spp., (h) Allenrolfea occidentalis, (i) Tetragonia tetragonioides, (j) Salicornia europaea, (k) Sesuvium portulacastrum, (l) Crambe maritima, (m) Glycyrrhiza glabra, (n) Distichlis spicata, (o) Sporobolus virginicus, (p) Bruguiera gymnorrhiza, (q) Aegiceras corniculatum, (r) Sonneratia apetala, (s) Avicennia marina, (t) Rhizophora mucronata, (u) Plantago media, and (v) Suaeda maritima.
Mentions: Halophytes are defined in different ways by many scientists based on different criteria. Schimper [18] defined halophytes as the plants capable of normal growth in saline habitats and also able to thrive on “ordinary” soil. According to Stocker [19], they are plants which can tolerate salt concentrations over 0.5% at any stage of life. More simply, Dansereau [20] mentioned that plants which grow exclusively on saline soil are halophytes. Greenway and Munns [21] defined halophytes as follows: “a kind of native flora of saline soils, which contain solutions with a Psi of at least 3.3 bar, being equivalent to 70 mM monovalent salts.” Plants that cannot survive in these habitats are classified as nonhalophytes. Unquestionably, this definition is not quite complete since there is a continuum from the least to the most salt-tolerant species. Some nonhalophytes can also survive in this kind of habitat and complete their life cycle, for example, sugar beet [22]. Some of the major halophytes are listed in Figure 1.

Bottom Line: The first is cost- and labor-intensive and needs some developmental strategies for implication; on the contrary, the phytoremediation by halophyte is more suitable as it can be executed very easily without those problems.Several halophyte species including grasses, shrubs, and trees can remove the salt from different kinds of salt-affected problematic soils through salt excluding, excreting, or accumulating by their morphological, anatomical, physiological adaptation in their organelle level and cellular level.Exploiting halophytes for reducing salinity can be good sources for meeting the basic needs of people in salt-affected areas as well.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Agronomy, Faculty of Agriculture, Sher-e-Bangla Agricultural University, Sher-e-Bangla Nagar, Dhaka 1207, Bangladesh.

ABSTRACT
Salinity is one of the rising problems causing tremendous yield losses in many regions of the world especially in arid and semiarid regions. To maximize crop productivity, these areas should be brought under utilization where there are options for removing salinity or using the salt-tolerant crops. Use of salt-tolerant crops does not remove the salt and hence halophytes that have capacity to accumulate and exclude the salt can be an effective way. Methods for salt removal include agronomic practices or phytoremediation. The first is cost- and labor-intensive and needs some developmental strategies for implication; on the contrary, the phytoremediation by halophyte is more suitable as it can be executed very easily without those problems. Several halophyte species including grasses, shrubs, and trees can remove the salt from different kinds of salt-affected problematic soils through salt excluding, excreting, or accumulating by their morphological, anatomical, physiological adaptation in their organelle level and cellular level. Exploiting halophytes for reducing salinity can be good sources for meeting the basic needs of people in salt-affected areas as well. This review focuses on the special adaptive features of halophytic plants under saline condition and the possible ways to utilize these plants to remediate salinity.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus