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Assessment of food processing and pharmaceutical industrial wastes as potential biosorbents: a review.

El-Sayed HE, El-Sayed MM - Biomed Res Int (2014)

Bottom Line: In spite of the wide spread application of these biosorbents in the treatment of heavy metals and dyes, more research is required on other classes of pollutants.More attention should also be given to enhancing mechanical strength, stability, life time, and reproducibility of the biosorbent.Environmental concerns regarding disposal of consumed biosorbents should be addressed by offering feasible biosorbent regeneration or pollutant immobilization options.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Mechanical Engineering Department, National Research Centre, Al Bohooth Station, Dokki, Giza 12622, Egypt ; Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, University of Windsor, 401 Sunset Avenue, Windsor, ON, Canada N9B 3P4.

ABSTRACT
There is a growing need for the use of low-cost and ecofriendly adsorbents in water/wastewater treatment applications. Conventional adsorbents as well as biosorbents from different natural and agricultural sources have been extensively studied and reviewed. However, there is a lack of reviews on biosorption utilizing industrial wastes, particularly those of food processing and pharmaceuticals. The current review evaluates the potential of these wastes as biosorbents for the removal of some hazardous contaminants. Sources and applications of these biosorbents are presented, while factors affecting biosorption are discussed. Equilibrium, kinetics, and mechanisms of biosorption are also reviewed. In spite of the wide spread application of these biosorbents in the treatment of heavy metals and dyes, more research is required on other classes of pollutants. In addition, further work should be dedicated to studying scaling up of the process and its economic feasibility. More attention should also be given to enhancing mechanical strength, stability, life time, and reproducibility of the biosorbent. Environmental concerns regarding disposal of consumed biosorbents should be addressed by offering feasible biosorbent regeneration or pollutant immobilization options.

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A schematic flow diagram showing the different types of available adsorbents.
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fig1: A schematic flow diagram showing the different types of available adsorbents.

Mentions: Adsorption as a process gained much more attention recently after the use of low-cost adsorbents became so popular especially biosorbents [24, 35]. Sources of different types of conventional and nonconventional adsorbents are illustrated in the flow chart in Figure 1.


Assessment of food processing and pharmaceutical industrial wastes as potential biosorbents: a review.

El-Sayed HE, El-Sayed MM - Biomed Res Int (2014)

A schematic flow diagram showing the different types of available adsorbents.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4109414&req=5

fig1: A schematic flow diagram showing the different types of available adsorbents.
Mentions: Adsorption as a process gained much more attention recently after the use of low-cost adsorbents became so popular especially biosorbents [24, 35]. Sources of different types of conventional and nonconventional adsorbents are illustrated in the flow chart in Figure 1.

Bottom Line: In spite of the wide spread application of these biosorbents in the treatment of heavy metals and dyes, more research is required on other classes of pollutants.More attention should also be given to enhancing mechanical strength, stability, life time, and reproducibility of the biosorbent.Environmental concerns regarding disposal of consumed biosorbents should be addressed by offering feasible biosorbent regeneration or pollutant immobilization options.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Mechanical Engineering Department, National Research Centre, Al Bohooth Station, Dokki, Giza 12622, Egypt ; Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, University of Windsor, 401 Sunset Avenue, Windsor, ON, Canada N9B 3P4.

ABSTRACT
There is a growing need for the use of low-cost and ecofriendly adsorbents in water/wastewater treatment applications. Conventional adsorbents as well as biosorbents from different natural and agricultural sources have been extensively studied and reviewed. However, there is a lack of reviews on biosorption utilizing industrial wastes, particularly those of food processing and pharmaceuticals. The current review evaluates the potential of these wastes as biosorbents for the removal of some hazardous contaminants. Sources and applications of these biosorbents are presented, while factors affecting biosorption are discussed. Equilibrium, kinetics, and mechanisms of biosorption are also reviewed. In spite of the wide spread application of these biosorbents in the treatment of heavy metals and dyes, more research is required on other classes of pollutants. In addition, further work should be dedicated to studying scaling up of the process and its economic feasibility. More attention should also be given to enhancing mechanical strength, stability, life time, and reproducibility of the biosorbent. Environmental concerns regarding disposal of consumed biosorbents should be addressed by offering feasible biosorbent regeneration or pollutant immobilization options.

Show MeSH