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Circadian clock of Aedes aegypti: effects of blood-feeding, insemination and RNA interference.

Gentile C, Rivas GB, Lima JB, Bruno RV, Peixoto AA - Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz (2013)

Bottom Line: We show that blood intake, but not insemination, is responsible for the down-regulation of clock genes.Using RNA interference, we observe a slight reduction in the evening activity peak in the fourth day after dstim injection.These data suggest that, as in Drosophila, clock gene expression, circadian behaviour and environmental light regimens are interconnected in Ae. aegypti.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratório de Biologia Molecular, Laboratório de Biologia Molecular.

ABSTRACT
Mosquitoes are the culprits of some of the most important vector borne diseases. A species' potential as a vector is directly dependent on their pattern of behaviour, which is known to change according to the female's physiological status such as whether the female is virgin/mated and unfed/blood-fed. However, the molecular mechanism triggered by and/or responsible for such modulations in behaviour is poorly understood. Clock genes are known to be responsible for the control of circadian behaviour in several species. Here we investigate the impact mating and blood-feeding have upon the expression of these genes in the mosquito Aedes aegypti. We show that blood intake, but not insemination, is responsible for the down-regulation of clock genes. Using RNA interference, we observe a slight reduction in the evening activity peak in the fourth day after dstim injection. These data suggest that, as in Drosophila, clock gene expression, circadian behaviour and environmental light regimens are interconnected in Ae. aegypti.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

: expression of clock genes period , timeless,cycle  and  Clock relative to the constitutivegene rp49 in the head and body of Aedes aegypti females either fed or unfed on blood. Error bars show standard error.Asterisks indicate when RNA expression is significantly different betweengroups of blood-fed females and control (unfed). Since the statisticsdemonstrate blood-feeding is the only relevant factor in the analysis, for thegraph representation, we joined the virgins and inseminated females and plottedonly the difference between blood-fed and unfed status. For details onstatistic results see Table I.
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f01: : expression of clock genes period , timeless,cycle and Clock relative to the constitutivegene rp49 in the head and body of Aedes aegypti females either fed or unfed on blood. Error bars show standard error.Asterisks indicate when RNA expression is significantly different betweengroups of blood-fed females and control (unfed). Since the statisticsdemonstrate blood-feeding is the only relevant factor in the analysis, for thegraph representation, we joined the virgins and inseminated females and plottedonly the difference between blood-fed and unfed status. For details onstatistic results see Table I.

Mentions: Effect of blood-feeding and insemination on clock gene expression - Wetested the effect of blood-feeding and insemination on the expression of the clock genesper , tim , cyc andClk , both in the head and body of Ae. aegyptifemales, comparing four groups of mosquitoes in distinct physiological states: (i)virgin/unfed, (ii) inseminated/unfed, (iii) virgin/blood-fed and (iv)inseminated/blood-fed. Analysis of variance of two factors (2-way ANOVA) was performedto determine the significance of the effect of insemination, blood-feeding and theinteraction of these two factors on the expression of the clock genes investigated. Theresults demonstrate blood-feeding alone is the only factor to cause consistent andsignificant impact on the gene expression. Therefore, for the graph representation, wejoined the virgins and inseminated females and plotted only the difference betweenblood-fed and unfed status ( Fig. 1 , Table I ). Its effect on the body was significantfor all four genes and significant for per and cyc and borderline for tim in the head ( Table I ). Fig. 1 shows that in allcases a reduction in clock gene expression was observed following blood-feeding.


Circadian clock of Aedes aegypti: effects of blood-feeding, insemination and RNA interference.

Gentile C, Rivas GB, Lima JB, Bruno RV, Peixoto AA - Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz (2013)

: expression of clock genes period , timeless,cycle  and  Clock relative to the constitutivegene rp49 in the head and body of Aedes aegypti females either fed or unfed on blood. Error bars show standard error.Asterisks indicate when RNA expression is significantly different betweengroups of blood-fed females and control (unfed). Since the statisticsdemonstrate blood-feeding is the only relevant factor in the analysis, for thegraph representation, we joined the virgins and inseminated females and plottedonly the difference between blood-fed and unfed status. For details onstatistic results see Table I.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4109183&req=5

f01: : expression of clock genes period , timeless,cycle and Clock relative to the constitutivegene rp49 in the head and body of Aedes aegypti females either fed or unfed on blood. Error bars show standard error.Asterisks indicate when RNA expression is significantly different betweengroups of blood-fed females and control (unfed). Since the statisticsdemonstrate blood-feeding is the only relevant factor in the analysis, for thegraph representation, we joined the virgins and inseminated females and plottedonly the difference between blood-fed and unfed status. For details onstatistic results see Table I.
Mentions: Effect of blood-feeding and insemination on clock gene expression - Wetested the effect of blood-feeding and insemination on the expression of the clock genesper , tim , cyc andClk , both in the head and body of Ae. aegyptifemales, comparing four groups of mosquitoes in distinct physiological states: (i)virgin/unfed, (ii) inseminated/unfed, (iii) virgin/blood-fed and (iv)inseminated/blood-fed. Analysis of variance of two factors (2-way ANOVA) was performedto determine the significance of the effect of insemination, blood-feeding and theinteraction of these two factors on the expression of the clock genes investigated. Theresults demonstrate blood-feeding alone is the only factor to cause consistent andsignificant impact on the gene expression. Therefore, for the graph representation, wejoined the virgins and inseminated females and plotted only the difference betweenblood-fed and unfed status ( Fig. 1 , Table I ). Its effect on the body was significantfor all four genes and significant for per and cyc and borderline for tim in the head ( Table I ). Fig. 1 shows that in allcases a reduction in clock gene expression was observed following blood-feeding.

Bottom Line: We show that blood intake, but not insemination, is responsible for the down-regulation of clock genes.Using RNA interference, we observe a slight reduction in the evening activity peak in the fourth day after dstim injection.These data suggest that, as in Drosophila, clock gene expression, circadian behaviour and environmental light regimens are interconnected in Ae. aegypti.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratório de Biologia Molecular, Laboratório de Biologia Molecular.

ABSTRACT
Mosquitoes are the culprits of some of the most important vector borne diseases. A species' potential as a vector is directly dependent on their pattern of behaviour, which is known to change according to the female's physiological status such as whether the female is virgin/mated and unfed/blood-fed. However, the molecular mechanism triggered by and/or responsible for such modulations in behaviour is poorly understood. Clock genes are known to be responsible for the control of circadian behaviour in several species. Here we investigate the impact mating and blood-feeding have upon the expression of these genes in the mosquito Aedes aegypti. We show that blood intake, but not insemination, is responsible for the down-regulation of clock genes. Using RNA interference, we observe a slight reduction in the evening activity peak in the fourth day after dstim injection. These data suggest that, as in Drosophila, clock gene expression, circadian behaviour and environmental light regimens are interconnected in Ae. aegypti.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus