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Behavioural biology of Chagas disease vectors.

Lazzari CR, Pereira MH, Lorenzo MG - Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz (2013)

Bottom Line: Thus, the haematophagous lifestyle is associated with major morphological, physiological and behavioural adaptations that have accumulated throughout the evolutionary history of the various lineages of blood-sucking arthropods.These adaptations have significant consequences for the evolution of parasites as well as for the epidemiology of vector-transmitted diseases.Our aim is to offer to the reader an up-to-date integrative perspective on the behaviour of Chagas disease vectors and to propose new research avenues to encourage both young and experienced colleagues to explore this aspect of triatomine biology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut de Recherche sur la Biologie de l'Insecte, Unité Mixte de Recherche 7261, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Université François Rabelais de Tours, France, ToursIndre et Loire, Institut de Recherche sur la Biologie de l'Insecte, Unité Mixte de Recherche 7261, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Université François Rabelais de Tours, Tours, Indre et Loire, France.

ABSTRACT
Many arthropod species have adopted vertebrate blood as their main food source. Blood is rich in nutrients and, except for the presence of parasites, sterile. However, this food source is not freely available, nor is obtaining it devoid of risk. It circulates inside vessels hidden underneath the skin of mobile hosts that are able to defend themselves and even predate the insects that try to feed on them. Thus, the haematophagous lifestyle is associated with major morphological, physiological and behavioural adaptations that have accumulated throughout the evolutionary history of the various lineages of blood-sucking arthropods. These adaptations have significant consequences for the evolution of parasites as well as for the epidemiology of vector-transmitted diseases. In this review article, we analyse various aspects of the behaviour of triatomine bugs to illustrate how each behavioural trait represents a particular adaptation to their close association with their hosts, which may easily turn into predators. Our aim is to offer to the reader an up-to-date integrative perspective on the behaviour of Chagas disease vectors and to propose new research avenues to encourage both young and experienced colleagues to explore this aspect of triatomine biology.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Exogenous and endogenous factors influencing host-seeking and feedingbehaviour in Chagas disease vectors. Hosts multimodal cues which attract or repelinsects depending on their motivational state. PER: proboscis extensionresponse.
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f01: Exogenous and endogenous factors influencing host-seeking and feedingbehaviour in Chagas disease vectors. Hosts multimodal cues which attract or repelinsects depending on their motivational state. PER: proboscis extensionresponse.

Mentions: Notably, in a natural context, triatomines are not exposed to single cues, such as specificodours or heat, but to multiple cue combinations of cues including different sensorymodalities (chemical, thermal, hydric). The extreme heat sensitivity of triatomines may befurther enhanced by its integration with cues from other sensory modalities. For example,it has been demonstrated that water vapour, which constitutes a close-range orientation cueby itself, also increases the responsiveness of triatomines to heat ( Barrozo et al. 2003 ). However, it is still unclear whether this is dueto the convergence of different sensory inputs in the insect brain or to a physicalphenomenon (i.e., moist air transports more heat that dry air). The Figure summarises all of the endogenous and exogenous factors affectinghost-seeking and host-feeding among Chagas disease vectors. These data strongly suggestthat bug responses to the presence of a potential host depend on the multimodal integrationof a variety of external cues, the insect’s physiological state and its individualexperience (see below).


Behavioural biology of Chagas disease vectors.

Lazzari CR, Pereira MH, Lorenzo MG - Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz (2013)

Exogenous and endogenous factors influencing host-seeking and feedingbehaviour in Chagas disease vectors. Hosts multimodal cues which attract or repelinsects depending on their motivational state. PER: proboscis extensionresponse.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4109178&req=5

f01: Exogenous and endogenous factors influencing host-seeking and feedingbehaviour in Chagas disease vectors. Hosts multimodal cues which attract or repelinsects depending on their motivational state. PER: proboscis extensionresponse.
Mentions: Notably, in a natural context, triatomines are not exposed to single cues, such as specificodours or heat, but to multiple cue combinations of cues including different sensorymodalities (chemical, thermal, hydric). The extreme heat sensitivity of triatomines may befurther enhanced by its integration with cues from other sensory modalities. For example,it has been demonstrated that water vapour, which constitutes a close-range orientation cueby itself, also increases the responsiveness of triatomines to heat ( Barrozo et al. 2003 ). However, it is still unclear whether this is dueto the convergence of different sensory inputs in the insect brain or to a physicalphenomenon (i.e., moist air transports more heat that dry air). The Figure summarises all of the endogenous and exogenous factors affectinghost-seeking and host-feeding among Chagas disease vectors. These data strongly suggestthat bug responses to the presence of a potential host depend on the multimodal integrationof a variety of external cues, the insect’s physiological state and its individualexperience (see below).

Bottom Line: Thus, the haematophagous lifestyle is associated with major morphological, physiological and behavioural adaptations that have accumulated throughout the evolutionary history of the various lineages of blood-sucking arthropods.These adaptations have significant consequences for the evolution of parasites as well as for the epidemiology of vector-transmitted diseases.Our aim is to offer to the reader an up-to-date integrative perspective on the behaviour of Chagas disease vectors and to propose new research avenues to encourage both young and experienced colleagues to explore this aspect of triatomine biology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut de Recherche sur la Biologie de l'Insecte, Unité Mixte de Recherche 7261, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Université François Rabelais de Tours, France, ToursIndre et Loire, Institut de Recherche sur la Biologie de l'Insecte, Unité Mixte de Recherche 7261, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Université François Rabelais de Tours, Tours, Indre et Loire, France.

ABSTRACT
Many arthropod species have adopted vertebrate blood as their main food source. Blood is rich in nutrients and, except for the presence of parasites, sterile. However, this food source is not freely available, nor is obtaining it devoid of risk. It circulates inside vessels hidden underneath the skin of mobile hosts that are able to defend themselves and even predate the insects that try to feed on them. Thus, the haematophagous lifestyle is associated with major morphological, physiological and behavioural adaptations that have accumulated throughout the evolutionary history of the various lineages of blood-sucking arthropods. These adaptations have significant consequences for the evolution of parasites as well as for the epidemiology of vector-transmitted diseases. In this review article, we analyse various aspects of the behaviour of triatomine bugs to illustrate how each behavioural trait represents a particular adaptation to their close association with their hosts, which may easily turn into predators. Our aim is to offer to the reader an up-to-date integrative perspective on the behaviour of Chagas disease vectors and to propose new research avenues to encourage both young and experienced colleagues to explore this aspect of triatomine biology.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus