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Acoustic communication in insect disease vectors.

Vigoder Fde M, Ritchie MG, Gibson G, Peixoto AA - Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz (2013)

Bottom Line: The significance of acoustic signals for a blood-sucking insect was first reported in the XIX century by Christopher Johnston, studying the hearing organs of mosquitoes, but has received relatively little attention in other disease vectors until recently.Acoustic signals are often associated with mating behaviour and sexual selection and changes in signalling can lead to rapid evolutionary divergence and may ultimately contribute to the process of speciation.Although the study of acoustic communication in insect vectors has been relatively limited, this review of research demonstrates their value as models for understanding both the functional and evolutionary significance of acoustic communication in insects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratório de Biologia Molecular de Insetos, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz-Fiocruz, Brasil, Rio de JaneiroRJ, Laboratório de Biologia Molecular de Insetos, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz-Fiocruz, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.

ABSTRACT
Acoustic signalling has been extensively studied in insect species, which has led to a better understanding of sexual communication, sexual selection and modes of speciation. The significance of acoustic signals for a blood-sucking insect was first reported in the XIX century by Christopher Johnston, studying the hearing organs of mosquitoes, but has received relatively little attention in other disease vectors until recently. Acoustic signals are often associated with mating behaviour and sexual selection and changes in signalling can lead to rapid evolutionary divergence and may ultimately contribute to the process of speciation. Songs can also have implications for the success of novel methods of disease control such as determining the mating competitiveness of modified insects used for mass-release control programs. Species-specific sound "signatures" may help identify incipient species within species complexes that may be of epidemiological significance, e.g. of higher vectorial capacity, thereby enabling the application of more focussed control measures to optimise the reduction of pathogen transmission. Although the study of acoustic communication in insect vectors has been relatively limited, this review of research demonstrates their value as models for understanding both the functional and evolutionary significance of acoustic communication in insects.

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: sample of the three types of songs found in the sandfly Lutzomyialongipalpis . The mix-type starts with a pattern similar to apulse-type and then switches to a more burst-type like song. Recordings show 1 secof song.
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f02: : sample of the three types of songs found in the sandfly Lutzomyialongipalpis . The mix-type starts with a pattern similar to apulse-type and then switches to a more burst-type like song. Recordings show 1 secof song.

Mentions: Three main types of primary song have been found in populations of the Lu.longipalpis complex so far: pulse-type, burst-type and mix-type ( Souza et al. 2004 , Araki et al. 2009 ). The pulse-type song, characterised by short pulses ( Fig. 2 ), is the most variable of the three types andfive distinct patterns have been found among populations in Brazil, with differences inmany song parameters, suggesting that each pattern belongs to a different cryptic species.This finding is consistent with molecular data, which shows that pulse-type populationshave higher genetic differentiation among them than burst-type populations ( Souza et al. 2004 , Araki et al. 2009 ).


Acoustic communication in insect disease vectors.

Vigoder Fde M, Ritchie MG, Gibson G, Peixoto AA - Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz (2013)

: sample of the three types of songs found in the sandfly Lutzomyialongipalpis . The mix-type starts with a pattern similar to apulse-type and then switches to a more burst-type like song. Recordings show 1 secof song.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4109177&req=5

f02: : sample of the three types of songs found in the sandfly Lutzomyialongipalpis . The mix-type starts with a pattern similar to apulse-type and then switches to a more burst-type like song. Recordings show 1 secof song.
Mentions: Three main types of primary song have been found in populations of the Lu.longipalpis complex so far: pulse-type, burst-type and mix-type ( Souza et al. 2004 , Araki et al. 2009 ). The pulse-type song, characterised by short pulses ( Fig. 2 ), is the most variable of the three types andfive distinct patterns have been found among populations in Brazil, with differences inmany song parameters, suggesting that each pattern belongs to a different cryptic species.This finding is consistent with molecular data, which shows that pulse-type populationshave higher genetic differentiation among them than burst-type populations ( Souza et al. 2004 , Araki et al. 2009 ).

Bottom Line: The significance of acoustic signals for a blood-sucking insect was first reported in the XIX century by Christopher Johnston, studying the hearing organs of mosquitoes, but has received relatively little attention in other disease vectors until recently.Acoustic signals are often associated with mating behaviour and sexual selection and changes in signalling can lead to rapid evolutionary divergence and may ultimately contribute to the process of speciation.Although the study of acoustic communication in insect vectors has been relatively limited, this review of research demonstrates their value as models for understanding both the functional and evolutionary significance of acoustic communication in insects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratório de Biologia Molecular de Insetos, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz-Fiocruz, Brasil, Rio de JaneiroRJ, Laboratório de Biologia Molecular de Insetos, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz-Fiocruz, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.

ABSTRACT
Acoustic signalling has been extensively studied in insect species, which has led to a better understanding of sexual communication, sexual selection and modes of speciation. The significance of acoustic signals for a blood-sucking insect was first reported in the XIX century by Christopher Johnston, studying the hearing organs of mosquitoes, but has received relatively little attention in other disease vectors until recently. Acoustic signals are often associated with mating behaviour and sexual selection and changes in signalling can lead to rapid evolutionary divergence and may ultimately contribute to the process of speciation. Songs can also have implications for the success of novel methods of disease control such as determining the mating competitiveness of modified insects used for mass-release control programs. Species-specific sound "signatures" may help identify incipient species within species complexes that may be of epidemiological significance, e.g. of higher vectorial capacity, thereby enabling the application of more focussed control measures to optimise the reduction of pathogen transmission. Although the study of acoustic communication in insect vectors has been relatively limited, this review of research demonstrates their value as models for understanding both the functional and evolutionary significance of acoustic communication in insects.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus