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Fusiform superior cerebellar artery aneurysm treated with STA-SCA bypass and trapping.

Lamis FC, De Paiva Neto MA, Cavalheiro S - Surg Neurol Int (2014)

Bottom Line: Different surgical techniques to address these challenging lesions have been described, and their application depends on whether the goal is to maintain the flow in the parent vessel or to occlude it.The patient was subjected to aneurysm trapping followed by a bypass between the superficial temporal artery (STA) and SCA and had an uneventful recovery.In selected cases of patients in good neurological condition with ruptured fusiform aneurysms at the proximal segments of SCA and who have poor evidence of collateral supply, the possibility of a STA-SCA bypass with aneurysm trapping must be considered.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Background: Fusiform aneurysms of cerebellar arteries are rare. Different surgical techniques to address these challenging lesions have been described, and their application depends on whether the goal is to maintain the flow in the parent vessel or to occlude it.

Case description: The authors reported a case of a fusiform aneurysm located in the lateral pontomesencephalic segment of the superior cerebellar artery (SCA) in a 32-year-old man who presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage. The patient was subjected to aneurysm trapping followed by a bypass between the superficial temporal artery (STA) and SCA and had an uneventful recovery.

Conclusions: Although only a few cases of fusiform aneurysms in the supracerebellar artery have been reported in the literature, the treatment strategies adopted were diverse. In selected cases of patients in good neurological condition with ruptured fusiform aneurysms at the proximal segments of SCA and who have poor evidence of collateral supply, the possibility of a STA-SCA bypass with aneurysm trapping must be considered. A review of the current treatment modalities of this pathology is also presented.

No MeSH data available.


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Vertebral angiography showing a fusiform aneurysm in pontomesencephalic segment of SCA
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Figure 1: Vertebral angiography showing a fusiform aneurysm in pontomesencephalic segment of SCA

Mentions: A 32-year-old man was admitted to the emergency room with a history of sudden headaches, vomiting, and drowsiness. His past medical history showed arterial hypertension. On neurological examination, he was confused without localized neurological deficits. A computerized tomography (CT) scan showed a dense subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) with blood in the fourth ventricle. He underwent a digital angiography, which revealed a 6 mm fusiform SCA aneurysm without other signs of vascular dissection [Figure 1].


Fusiform superior cerebellar artery aneurysm treated with STA-SCA bypass and trapping.

Lamis FC, De Paiva Neto MA, Cavalheiro S - Surg Neurol Int (2014)

Vertebral angiography showing a fusiform aneurysm in pontomesencephalic segment of SCA
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4109170&req=5

Figure 1: Vertebral angiography showing a fusiform aneurysm in pontomesencephalic segment of SCA
Mentions: A 32-year-old man was admitted to the emergency room with a history of sudden headaches, vomiting, and drowsiness. His past medical history showed arterial hypertension. On neurological examination, he was confused without localized neurological deficits. A computerized tomography (CT) scan showed a dense subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) with blood in the fourth ventricle. He underwent a digital angiography, which revealed a 6 mm fusiform SCA aneurysm without other signs of vascular dissection [Figure 1].

Bottom Line: Different surgical techniques to address these challenging lesions have been described, and their application depends on whether the goal is to maintain the flow in the parent vessel or to occlude it.The patient was subjected to aneurysm trapping followed by a bypass between the superficial temporal artery (STA) and SCA and had an uneventful recovery.In selected cases of patients in good neurological condition with ruptured fusiform aneurysms at the proximal segments of SCA and who have poor evidence of collateral supply, the possibility of a STA-SCA bypass with aneurysm trapping must be considered.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Background: Fusiform aneurysms of cerebellar arteries are rare. Different surgical techniques to address these challenging lesions have been described, and their application depends on whether the goal is to maintain the flow in the parent vessel or to occlude it.

Case description: The authors reported a case of a fusiform aneurysm located in the lateral pontomesencephalic segment of the superior cerebellar artery (SCA) in a 32-year-old man who presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage. The patient was subjected to aneurysm trapping followed by a bypass between the superficial temporal artery (STA) and SCA and had an uneventful recovery.

Conclusions: Although only a few cases of fusiform aneurysms in the supracerebellar artery have been reported in the literature, the treatment strategies adopted were diverse. In selected cases of patients in good neurological condition with ruptured fusiform aneurysms at the proximal segments of SCA and who have poor evidence of collateral supply, the possibility of a STA-SCA bypass with aneurysm trapping must be considered. A review of the current treatment modalities of this pathology is also presented.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus