Limits...
Vitamin E in sarcopenia: current evidences on its role in prevention and treatment.

Khor SC, Abdul Karim N, Ngah WZ, Yusof YA, Makpol S - Oxid Med Cell Longev (2014)

Bottom Line: Vitamin E is a lipid soluble vitamin, with potent antioxidant properties and current evidence suggesting a role in the modulation of signaling pathways.Previous studies have shown its possible beneficial effects on aging and age-related diseases.Therefore, we reviewed the role of vitamin E and its potential protective mechanisms on muscle health based on previous and current in vitro and in vivo studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Jalan Raja Muda Abdul Aziz, 50300 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

ABSTRACT
Sarcopenia is a geriatric syndrome that is characterized by gradual loss of muscle mass and strength with increasing age. Although the underlying mechanism is still unknown, the contribution of increased oxidative stress in advanced age has been recognized as one of the risk factors of sarcopenia. Thus, eliminating reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be a strategy to combat sarcopenia. In this review, we discuss the potential role of vitamin E in the prevention and treatment of sarcopenia. Vitamin E is a lipid soluble vitamin, with potent antioxidant properties and current evidence suggesting a role in the modulation of signaling pathways. Previous studies have shown its possible beneficial effects on aging and age-related diseases. Although there are evidences suggesting an association between vitamin E and muscle health, they are still inconclusive compared to other more extensively studied chronic diseases such as neurodegenerative diseases and cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, we reviewed the role of vitamin E and its potential protective mechanisms on muscle health based on previous and current in vitro and in vivo studies.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Role of vitamin E on cell membrane repair. During muscle contraction, production of ROS may cause membrane injury which is repaired by vitamin E [131].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4109111&req=5

fig3: Role of vitamin E on cell membrane repair. During muscle contraction, production of ROS may cause membrane injury which is repaired by vitamin E [131].

Mentions: In the presence of adequate vitamin E levels, skeletal muscle survived, even though there is a massive production of ROS during muscle contraction because vitamin E helps in repairing the myoblasts membrane (Figure 3). In a study using C2C12 myoblasts, Howard and colleagues indicated that the antioxidant property alone is not sufficient to repair the injured myoblast membrane. α-Tocopherol has been reported to be better than other antioxidants as it acts as a stabilizer for the membrane due to its nature lipid soluble properties that allow it to enter the hydrophobic core of plasma membrane. In addition, its chromanol-head group with antioxidant activity can bind to phospholipids head on the membrane surface and scavenges the ROS effectively [131]. As reported earlier, membrane fluidity increases with increasing age, which causes instability of membranes [127]. Therefore, vitamin E acting as a “stabilizer” of the plasma membranes will equally be effective in repairing the damaged membrane during aging as well as in sarcopenic muscle. Besides preventing lipid peroxidation, vitamin E is able to induce Ca2+-triggered fusion events that are involved in membrane repair by stimulating the negative impulsive bend [131].


Vitamin E in sarcopenia: current evidences on its role in prevention and treatment.

Khor SC, Abdul Karim N, Ngah WZ, Yusof YA, Makpol S - Oxid Med Cell Longev (2014)

Role of vitamin E on cell membrane repair. During muscle contraction, production of ROS may cause membrane injury which is repaired by vitamin E [131].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4109111&req=5

fig3: Role of vitamin E on cell membrane repair. During muscle contraction, production of ROS may cause membrane injury which is repaired by vitamin E [131].
Mentions: In the presence of adequate vitamin E levels, skeletal muscle survived, even though there is a massive production of ROS during muscle contraction because vitamin E helps in repairing the myoblasts membrane (Figure 3). In a study using C2C12 myoblasts, Howard and colleagues indicated that the antioxidant property alone is not sufficient to repair the injured myoblast membrane. α-Tocopherol has been reported to be better than other antioxidants as it acts as a stabilizer for the membrane due to its nature lipid soluble properties that allow it to enter the hydrophobic core of plasma membrane. In addition, its chromanol-head group with antioxidant activity can bind to phospholipids head on the membrane surface and scavenges the ROS effectively [131]. As reported earlier, membrane fluidity increases with increasing age, which causes instability of membranes [127]. Therefore, vitamin E acting as a “stabilizer” of the plasma membranes will equally be effective in repairing the damaged membrane during aging as well as in sarcopenic muscle. Besides preventing lipid peroxidation, vitamin E is able to induce Ca2+-triggered fusion events that are involved in membrane repair by stimulating the negative impulsive bend [131].

Bottom Line: Vitamin E is a lipid soluble vitamin, with potent antioxidant properties and current evidence suggesting a role in the modulation of signaling pathways.Previous studies have shown its possible beneficial effects on aging and age-related diseases.Therefore, we reviewed the role of vitamin E and its potential protective mechanisms on muscle health based on previous and current in vitro and in vivo studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Jalan Raja Muda Abdul Aziz, 50300 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

ABSTRACT
Sarcopenia is a geriatric syndrome that is characterized by gradual loss of muscle mass and strength with increasing age. Although the underlying mechanism is still unknown, the contribution of increased oxidative stress in advanced age has been recognized as one of the risk factors of sarcopenia. Thus, eliminating reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be a strategy to combat sarcopenia. In this review, we discuss the potential role of vitamin E in the prevention and treatment of sarcopenia. Vitamin E is a lipid soluble vitamin, with potent antioxidant properties and current evidence suggesting a role in the modulation of signaling pathways. Previous studies have shown its possible beneficial effects on aging and age-related diseases. Although there are evidences suggesting an association between vitamin E and muscle health, they are still inconclusive compared to other more extensively studied chronic diseases such as neurodegenerative diseases and cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, we reviewed the role of vitamin E and its potential protective mechanisms on muscle health based on previous and current in vitro and in vivo studies.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus