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The Center for Healthy Weight: an academic medical center response to childhood obesity.

Robinson TN, Kemby KM - Int J Obes Suppl (2012)

Bottom Line: The design provides both breadth and depth through six cores: Research, Patient Care, Community Programs, Advocating for Public Policy Change, Training and Professional Education, and the Healthy Hospital Initiative.The Center and its cores are designed to facilitate interdisciplinary collaboration across the university, medical school, children's hospital and surrounding community.The foci of these cores are likely to be relevant to almost any academic medical center's mission and functions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of General Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford Prevention Research Center, Department of Medicine, and Center for Healthy Weight, Stanford University School of Medicine , Palo Alto, CA, USA ; Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford , Palo Alto, CA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Childhood obesity represents a worldwide medical and public health challenge. Academic medical centers cannot avoid the effects of the obesity epidemic, and must adopt strategies for their academic, clinical and public policy responses to childhood obesity. The Center for Healthy Weight at Stanford University and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford provides an example and model of one such strategy. The design provides both breadth and depth through six cores: Research, Patient Care, Community Programs, Advocating for Public Policy Change, Training and Professional Education, and the Healthy Hospital Initiative. The Center and its cores are designed to facilitate interdisciplinary collaboration across the university, medical school, children's hospital and surrounding community. The foci of these cores are likely to be relevant to almost any academic medical center's mission and functions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Organization of the Center for Healthy Weight at Stanford University and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford. The Center Director reports to the Children's Hospital CEO and the Chair of the Department of Pediatrics. Major Cores are shown, as well as distinct programs within each Core. Each Core has its own Director, except the Advocating for Public Policy Change Core, which has two Co-directors, one representing the medical school advocacy programs and the other the hospital's Director of Government Relations. Each distinct program shown within the cores also has its own leadership. Other related programs, for example, the hospital's Department of Clinical Nutrition, participate in Center programs, but have their own leadership within the hospital's organizational framework. In this way, the Center for Healthy Weight is able to pull together researchers, clinicians, other professionals and programs from across the hospitals, the school of medicine, the greater university and the local community, without creating new organizational reporting relationships.
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fig2: Organization of the Center for Healthy Weight at Stanford University and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford. The Center Director reports to the Children's Hospital CEO and the Chair of the Department of Pediatrics. Major Cores are shown, as well as distinct programs within each Core. Each Core has its own Director, except the Advocating for Public Policy Change Core, which has two Co-directors, one representing the medical school advocacy programs and the other the hospital's Director of Government Relations. Each distinct program shown within the cores also has its own leadership. Other related programs, for example, the hospital's Department of Clinical Nutrition, participate in Center programs, but have their own leadership within the hospital's organizational framework. In this way, the Center for Healthy Weight is able to pull together researchers, clinicians, other professionals and programs from across the hospitals, the school of medicine, the greater university and the local community, without creating new organizational reporting relationships.

Mentions: This understanding led to a particularly key design feature of the Center, to cross institutional barriers, to include resources from the children's hospital, the rest of the medical center, the medical school, the broader university, as well as the local community. Academic medical centers and their affiliated medical schools and universities are somewhat unique in their potential to respond to childhood obesity simultaneously across the entire spectrum of levels of influence and organization. This partly arises from the breadth and depth of disciplines available in an academic environment that may all contribute to understanding causes and developing and testing solutions. Bringing multiple perspectives together can create exciting new synergies and collaborations that may be more likely to produce scientific breakthroughs and meaningful advances in patient care and public health. Reflecting this multilevel view of the problem and the desire to promote collaboration at all levels, the Center for Healthy Weight is organized to include six, cross-cutting core programs or pillars: Research, Patient Care, Community Programs, Advocating for Public Policy Change, Training and Professional Education, and a Healthy Hospital Initiative. The organization of the Center is illustrated in Figure 2.


The Center for Healthy Weight: an academic medical center response to childhood obesity.

Robinson TN, Kemby KM - Int J Obes Suppl (2012)

Organization of the Center for Healthy Weight at Stanford University and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford. The Center Director reports to the Children's Hospital CEO and the Chair of the Department of Pediatrics. Major Cores are shown, as well as distinct programs within each Core. Each Core has its own Director, except the Advocating for Public Policy Change Core, which has two Co-directors, one representing the medical school advocacy programs and the other the hospital's Director of Government Relations. Each distinct program shown within the cores also has its own leadership. Other related programs, for example, the hospital's Department of Clinical Nutrition, participate in Center programs, but have their own leadership within the hospital's organizational framework. In this way, the Center for Healthy Weight is able to pull together researchers, clinicians, other professionals and programs from across the hospitals, the school of medicine, the greater university and the local community, without creating new organizational reporting relationships.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4109085&req=5

fig2: Organization of the Center for Healthy Weight at Stanford University and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford. The Center Director reports to the Children's Hospital CEO and the Chair of the Department of Pediatrics. Major Cores are shown, as well as distinct programs within each Core. Each Core has its own Director, except the Advocating for Public Policy Change Core, which has two Co-directors, one representing the medical school advocacy programs and the other the hospital's Director of Government Relations. Each distinct program shown within the cores also has its own leadership. Other related programs, for example, the hospital's Department of Clinical Nutrition, participate in Center programs, but have their own leadership within the hospital's organizational framework. In this way, the Center for Healthy Weight is able to pull together researchers, clinicians, other professionals and programs from across the hospitals, the school of medicine, the greater university and the local community, without creating new organizational reporting relationships.
Mentions: This understanding led to a particularly key design feature of the Center, to cross institutional barriers, to include resources from the children's hospital, the rest of the medical center, the medical school, the broader university, as well as the local community. Academic medical centers and their affiliated medical schools and universities are somewhat unique in their potential to respond to childhood obesity simultaneously across the entire spectrum of levels of influence and organization. This partly arises from the breadth and depth of disciplines available in an academic environment that may all contribute to understanding causes and developing and testing solutions. Bringing multiple perspectives together can create exciting new synergies and collaborations that may be more likely to produce scientific breakthroughs and meaningful advances in patient care and public health. Reflecting this multilevel view of the problem and the desire to promote collaboration at all levels, the Center for Healthy Weight is organized to include six, cross-cutting core programs or pillars: Research, Patient Care, Community Programs, Advocating for Public Policy Change, Training and Professional Education, and a Healthy Hospital Initiative. The organization of the Center is illustrated in Figure 2.

Bottom Line: The design provides both breadth and depth through six cores: Research, Patient Care, Community Programs, Advocating for Public Policy Change, Training and Professional Education, and the Healthy Hospital Initiative.The Center and its cores are designed to facilitate interdisciplinary collaboration across the university, medical school, children's hospital and surrounding community.The foci of these cores are likely to be relevant to almost any academic medical center's mission and functions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of General Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford Prevention Research Center, Department of Medicine, and Center for Healthy Weight, Stanford University School of Medicine , Palo Alto, CA, USA ; Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford , Palo Alto, CA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Childhood obesity represents a worldwide medical and public health challenge. Academic medical centers cannot avoid the effects of the obesity epidemic, and must adopt strategies for their academic, clinical and public policy responses to childhood obesity. The Center for Healthy Weight at Stanford University and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford provides an example and model of one such strategy. The design provides both breadth and depth through six cores: Research, Patient Care, Community Programs, Advocating for Public Policy Change, Training and Professional Education, and the Healthy Hospital Initiative. The Center and its cores are designed to facilitate interdisciplinary collaboration across the university, medical school, children's hospital and surrounding community. The foci of these cores are likely to be relevant to almost any academic medical center's mission and functions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus