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The Center for Healthy Weight: an academic medical center response to childhood obesity.

Robinson TN, Kemby KM - Int J Obes Suppl (2012)

Bottom Line: The design provides both breadth and depth through six cores: Research, Patient Care, Community Programs, Advocating for Public Policy Change, Training and Professional Education, and the Healthy Hospital Initiative.The Center and its cores are designed to facilitate interdisciplinary collaboration across the university, medical school, children's hospital and surrounding community.The foci of these cores are likely to be relevant to almost any academic medical center's mission and functions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of General Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford Prevention Research Center, Department of Medicine, and Center for Healthy Weight, Stanford University School of Medicine , Palo Alto, CA, USA ; Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford , Palo Alto, CA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Childhood obesity represents a worldwide medical and public health challenge. Academic medical centers cannot avoid the effects of the obesity epidemic, and must adopt strategies for their academic, clinical and public policy responses to childhood obesity. The Center for Healthy Weight at Stanford University and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford provides an example and model of one such strategy. The design provides both breadth and depth through six cores: Research, Patient Care, Community Programs, Advocating for Public Policy Change, Training and Professional Education, and the Healthy Hospital Initiative. The Center and its cores are designed to facilitate interdisciplinary collaboration across the university, medical school, children's hospital and surrounding community. The foci of these cores are likely to be relevant to almost any academic medical center's mission and functions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic of the multilevel complexity of the causes, consequences, and potential treatment and prevention strategies. The central rectangles represent child and adolescent eating and activity behaviors that influence energy balance, growth, health and disease. These are influenced at multiple levels of organization. The lower concentric ovals represent examples of organizational levels within the individual child. The upper concentric ovals represent examples of organizational levels outside the individual child. The vertical list on the right includes examples of departments, institutes and schools of the University with relevance to the academic mission of the Center for Healthy Weight.
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fig1: Schematic of the multilevel complexity of the causes, consequences, and potential treatment and prevention strategies. The central rectangles represent child and adolescent eating and activity behaviors that influence energy balance, growth, health and disease. These are influenced at multiple levels of organization. The lower concentric ovals represent examples of organizational levels within the individual child. The upper concentric ovals represent examples of organizational levels outside the individual child. The vertical list on the right includes examples of departments, institutes and schools of the University with relevance to the academic mission of the Center for Healthy Weight.

Mentions: At the foundation of the design of the Center for Healthy Weight is the acknowledgment of the multilevel complexity of the causes, consequences, and potential treatment and prevention strategies. Figure 1 illustrates the multiple, nested levels of influence on a child's energy balance, growth, health and disease. The upper concentric ovals include extra-individual or societal levels of influence, and the lower concentric ovals include intra-individual biological and psychological levels of influence. Children's eating and activity behaviors, and thus energy balance, are influenced by societal, biological and psychological factors, independently and interactively, to determine a child's phenotype, his or her growth, health and disease. The vertical box along the right side of Figure 1 includes a non-exhaustive list of Stanford University academic departments and university-wide initiatives that can contribute to our understandings of the etiologies, consequences, treatment and prevention of childhood obesity. The large number and variety of relevant fields reflects the complexity of the problem. The Center for Healthy Weight is designed to bring these disciplines together, along with the clinical and community programs related to childhood obesity, to solve the problem of childhood obesity.


The Center for Healthy Weight: an academic medical center response to childhood obesity.

Robinson TN, Kemby KM - Int J Obes Suppl (2012)

Schematic of the multilevel complexity of the causes, consequences, and potential treatment and prevention strategies. The central rectangles represent child and adolescent eating and activity behaviors that influence energy balance, growth, health and disease. These are influenced at multiple levels of organization. The lower concentric ovals represent examples of organizational levels within the individual child. The upper concentric ovals represent examples of organizational levels outside the individual child. The vertical list on the right includes examples of departments, institutes and schools of the University with relevance to the academic mission of the Center for Healthy Weight.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4109085&req=5

fig1: Schematic of the multilevel complexity of the causes, consequences, and potential treatment and prevention strategies. The central rectangles represent child and adolescent eating and activity behaviors that influence energy balance, growth, health and disease. These are influenced at multiple levels of organization. The lower concentric ovals represent examples of organizational levels within the individual child. The upper concentric ovals represent examples of organizational levels outside the individual child. The vertical list on the right includes examples of departments, institutes and schools of the University with relevance to the academic mission of the Center for Healthy Weight.
Mentions: At the foundation of the design of the Center for Healthy Weight is the acknowledgment of the multilevel complexity of the causes, consequences, and potential treatment and prevention strategies. Figure 1 illustrates the multiple, nested levels of influence on a child's energy balance, growth, health and disease. The upper concentric ovals include extra-individual or societal levels of influence, and the lower concentric ovals include intra-individual biological and psychological levels of influence. Children's eating and activity behaviors, and thus energy balance, are influenced by societal, biological and psychological factors, independently and interactively, to determine a child's phenotype, his or her growth, health and disease. The vertical box along the right side of Figure 1 includes a non-exhaustive list of Stanford University academic departments and university-wide initiatives that can contribute to our understandings of the etiologies, consequences, treatment and prevention of childhood obesity. The large number and variety of relevant fields reflects the complexity of the problem. The Center for Healthy Weight is designed to bring these disciplines together, along with the clinical and community programs related to childhood obesity, to solve the problem of childhood obesity.

Bottom Line: The design provides both breadth and depth through six cores: Research, Patient Care, Community Programs, Advocating for Public Policy Change, Training and Professional Education, and the Healthy Hospital Initiative.The Center and its cores are designed to facilitate interdisciplinary collaboration across the university, medical school, children's hospital and surrounding community.The foci of these cores are likely to be relevant to almost any academic medical center's mission and functions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of General Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford Prevention Research Center, Department of Medicine, and Center for Healthy Weight, Stanford University School of Medicine , Palo Alto, CA, USA ; Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford , Palo Alto, CA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Childhood obesity represents a worldwide medical and public health challenge. Academic medical centers cannot avoid the effects of the obesity epidemic, and must adopt strategies for their academic, clinical and public policy responses to childhood obesity. The Center for Healthy Weight at Stanford University and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford provides an example and model of one such strategy. The design provides both breadth and depth through six cores: Research, Patient Care, Community Programs, Advocating for Public Policy Change, Training and Professional Education, and the Healthy Hospital Initiative. The Center and its cores are designed to facilitate interdisciplinary collaboration across the university, medical school, children's hospital and surrounding community. The foci of these cores are likely to be relevant to almost any academic medical center's mission and functions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus