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Systemic medication and intraocular pressure in a British population: the EPIC-Norfolk Eye Study.

Khawaja AP, Chan MP, Broadway DC, Garway-Heath DF, Luben R, Yip JL, Hayat S, Wareham NJ, Khaw KT, Foster PJ - Ophthalmology (2014)

Bottom Line: Use of systemic β-blockers (-0.92 mmHg; 95% CI, -1.19, -0.65; P<0.001) and nitrates (-0.63 mmHg; 95% CI, -1.12, -0.14; P = 0.011) were independently associated with lower IOP.The observed associations between statin or aspirin use with IOP were no longer significant after adjustment for β-blocker use.This is the first population-based study to demonstrate and quantify clinically significant differences in IOP among participants using systemic β-blockers or nitrates.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Institute of Public Health, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, UK. Electronic address: anthony.khawaja@gmail.com.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Regression coefficients with 95% confidence intervals for the associations between medication classes and intraocular pressure (IOP). These are results from 1 multivariable regression model containing all medications shown and further adjusted for age, gender, and body mass index.
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fig1: Regression coefficients with 95% confidence intervals for the associations between medication classes and intraocular pressure (IOP). These are results from 1 multivariable regression model containing all medications shown and further adjusted for age, gender, and body mass index.

Mentions: After adjustment for possible confounders (age, gender, BMI, and blood glycosylated hemoglobin level), β-blocker (P<0.001), nitrate (P<0.001), statin (P = 0.003), and aspirin (P<0.001) use remained significantly associated with lower IOP (Table 2). When these 4 drugs were included in the same multivariable model, only the use of β-blockers (−0.92 mmHg; 95% CI, −1.19 to −0.65; P<0.001) or nitrates (−0.63 mmHg; 95% CI, −1.12 to −0.14; P = 0.011) remained significantly associated with IOP (Fig 1). Further analysis identified concurrent use of β-blockers as the explanation for the single medication associations observed between IOP and statins or aspirin; these associations lost significance when further adjusted for β-blocker use, but remained significant after further adjustment for nitrate use (Appendix 2; available at www.aaojournal.org).


Systemic medication and intraocular pressure in a British population: the EPIC-Norfolk Eye Study.

Khawaja AP, Chan MP, Broadway DC, Garway-Heath DF, Luben R, Yip JL, Hayat S, Wareham NJ, Khaw KT, Foster PJ - Ophthalmology (2014)

Regression coefficients with 95% confidence intervals for the associations between medication classes and intraocular pressure (IOP). These are results from 1 multivariable regression model containing all medications shown and further adjusted for age, gender, and body mass index.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4109027&req=5

fig1: Regression coefficients with 95% confidence intervals for the associations between medication classes and intraocular pressure (IOP). These are results from 1 multivariable regression model containing all medications shown and further adjusted for age, gender, and body mass index.
Mentions: After adjustment for possible confounders (age, gender, BMI, and blood glycosylated hemoglobin level), β-blocker (P<0.001), nitrate (P<0.001), statin (P = 0.003), and aspirin (P<0.001) use remained significantly associated with lower IOP (Table 2). When these 4 drugs were included in the same multivariable model, only the use of β-blockers (−0.92 mmHg; 95% CI, −1.19 to −0.65; P<0.001) or nitrates (−0.63 mmHg; 95% CI, −1.12 to −0.14; P = 0.011) remained significantly associated with IOP (Fig 1). Further analysis identified concurrent use of β-blockers as the explanation for the single medication associations observed between IOP and statins or aspirin; these associations lost significance when further adjusted for β-blocker use, but remained significant after further adjustment for nitrate use (Appendix 2; available at www.aaojournal.org).

Bottom Line: Use of systemic β-blockers (-0.92 mmHg; 95% CI, -1.19, -0.65; P<0.001) and nitrates (-0.63 mmHg; 95% CI, -1.12, -0.14; P = 0.011) were independently associated with lower IOP.The observed associations between statin or aspirin use with IOP were no longer significant after adjustment for β-blocker use.This is the first population-based study to demonstrate and quantify clinically significant differences in IOP among participants using systemic β-blockers or nitrates.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Institute of Public Health, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, UK. Electronic address: anthony.khawaja@gmail.com.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus