Limits...
Treatment of acute lung injury by targeting MG53-mediated cell membrane repair.

Jia Y, Chen K, Lin P, Lieber G, Nishi M, Yan R, Wang Z, Yao Y, Li Y, Whitson BA, Duann P, Li H, Zhou X, Zhu H, Takeshima H, Hunter JC, McLeod RL, Weisleder N, Zeng C, Ma J - Nat Commun (2014)

Bottom Line: Here we show that MG53 also has a physiological role in the lung and may be used as a treatment in animal models of acute lung injury.Intravenous delivery or inhalation of rhMG53 reduces symptoms in rodent models of acute lung injury and emphysema.Our data indicate a physiological function for MG53 in the lung and suggest that targeting membrane repair may be an effective means for treatment or prevention of lung diseases.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] Department of Respiratory and Immunology, Merck Research Lab, Kenilworth, New Jersey 07033, USA [2].

ABSTRACT
Injury to lung epithelial cells has a role in multiple lung diseases. We previously identified mitsugumin 53 (MG53) as a component of the cell membrane repair machinery in striated muscle cells. Here we show that MG53 also has a physiological role in the lung and may be used as a treatment in animal models of acute lung injury. Mice lacking MG53 show increased susceptibility to ischaemia-reperfusion and overventilation-induced injury to the lung when compared with wild-type mice. Extracellular application of recombinant human MG53 (rhMG53) protein protects cultured lung epithelial cells against anoxia/reoxygenation-induced injuries. Intravenous delivery or inhalation of rhMG53 reduces symptoms in rodent models of acute lung injury and emphysema. Repetitive administration of rhMG53 improves pulmonary structure associated with chronic lung injury in mice. Our data indicate a physiological function for MG53 in the lung and suggest that targeting membrane repair may be an effective means for treatment or prevention of lung diseases.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Expression of MG53 in lung tissue. A. Homogenates of lung tissue derived from the wild type and mg53−/− mice were used for western blot for detection of MG53. 0.1 ng rhMG53 was used as positive control. For comparative purpose, the content of MG53 in skeletal muscle was assayed at different concentrations of muscle tissues. Ponceau S staining reveals differential loading of the skeletal muscle and lung tissues. A nonspecific 40 kDa protein was also recognized by our custom-made anti-MG53 antibody. The uncropped western blots images are shown on Supplementary Fig 1. B. Characterization of lung mg53 transcripts by RACE cDNA amplification. The cDNA amplification strategy is illustrated in the upper panel. A mouse lung cDNA preparation was amplified using AP1 and MA1 primers in the 5’-RACE reaction or using MS1 and AP1 primers in the 3’-RACE reaction. Amplified cDNA products in each RACE reaction were analyzed in agarose electrophoresis as shown in the lower panel. Putative full-length cDNAs marked with asterisks were extracted from agarose gels and subcloned into a plasmid vector for sequencing. The protein-coding sequence of the amplified lung mg53 cDNAs was identical to that of muscle mg53 cDNAs determined in our previous study. C. IHC staining with an anti-MG53 antibody revealed high level of MG53 in wild type skeletal muscle, which is absent in the mg53−/−muscle. D-F. IHC staining of lung tissues derived from wild type (left panels) or mg53−/− mice (right panels). Compared with skeletal muscle, low level of MG53 could be detected in lung (D). Background staining in the mg53−/− lung likely reflects auto fluorescence of capillary cells or non-specific activity of the anti-MG53 antibody (see the 40 kDa band in panel A). The MG53 expression pattern in wild type lung matches to that of AT1α, a type I alveolar cell marker (E). The MG53 and AT1α (type 1a angiotensin II receptor) (anti-AT1α, Novus Biologicals NB600-1015) stainings (D and E) were shown separately to better indicate the localization of MG53 due to its low expression in alveolar cells. The cross section of bronchioles revealed negative staining for MG53 in both airway smooth muscle layer (arrow) and the neighboring ciliated endothelial lining of the airway lumen (arrow head) (F). All scale bars represent 50 μm. G. Immunoblotting of MG53 with lysates from mouse lung tissues, and cells derived from A549, PPAEC, MVEC-L and HUVEC (50 μg/lane). 1 ng rhMG53 served as a positive control for the immunoblotting.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4109002&req=5

Figure 1: Expression of MG53 in lung tissue. A. Homogenates of lung tissue derived from the wild type and mg53−/− mice were used for western blot for detection of MG53. 0.1 ng rhMG53 was used as positive control. For comparative purpose, the content of MG53 in skeletal muscle was assayed at different concentrations of muscle tissues. Ponceau S staining reveals differential loading of the skeletal muscle and lung tissues. A nonspecific 40 kDa protein was also recognized by our custom-made anti-MG53 antibody. The uncropped western blots images are shown on Supplementary Fig 1. B. Characterization of lung mg53 transcripts by RACE cDNA amplification. The cDNA amplification strategy is illustrated in the upper panel. A mouse lung cDNA preparation was amplified using AP1 and MA1 primers in the 5’-RACE reaction or using MS1 and AP1 primers in the 3’-RACE reaction. Amplified cDNA products in each RACE reaction were analyzed in agarose electrophoresis as shown in the lower panel. Putative full-length cDNAs marked with asterisks were extracted from agarose gels and subcloned into a plasmid vector for sequencing. The protein-coding sequence of the amplified lung mg53 cDNAs was identical to that of muscle mg53 cDNAs determined in our previous study. C. IHC staining with an anti-MG53 antibody revealed high level of MG53 in wild type skeletal muscle, which is absent in the mg53−/−muscle. D-F. IHC staining of lung tissues derived from wild type (left panels) or mg53−/− mice (right panels). Compared with skeletal muscle, low level of MG53 could be detected in lung (D). Background staining in the mg53−/− lung likely reflects auto fluorescence of capillary cells or non-specific activity of the anti-MG53 antibody (see the 40 kDa band in panel A). The MG53 expression pattern in wild type lung matches to that of AT1α, a type I alveolar cell marker (E). The MG53 and AT1α (type 1a angiotensin II receptor) (anti-AT1α, Novus Biologicals NB600-1015) stainings (D and E) were shown separately to better indicate the localization of MG53 due to its low expression in alveolar cells. The cross section of bronchioles revealed negative staining for MG53 in both airway smooth muscle layer (arrow) and the neighboring ciliated endothelial lining of the airway lumen (arrow head) (F). All scale bars represent 50 μm. G. Immunoblotting of MG53 with lysates from mouse lung tissues, and cells derived from A549, PPAEC, MVEC-L and HUVEC (50 μg/lane). 1 ng rhMG53 served as a positive control for the immunoblotting.

Mentions: The mg53 gene was originally cloned from skeletal muscle using an immuno-proteomics approach20. Biochemical studies showed that MG53 protein is enriched in striated muscles5, 7, 21. Here we tested whether MG53 protein is also expressed in the lung. Western blot showed that MG53 could only be detected in lysates of lung tissue derived from the wild type mice, but not in the mg53−/− lung homogenate (Fig. 1A and Supplementary Fig. 1). Quantitative assessment revealed that the level of MG53 protein in the lung tissue is approximately 5% of that in skeletal muscle.


Treatment of acute lung injury by targeting MG53-mediated cell membrane repair.

Jia Y, Chen K, Lin P, Lieber G, Nishi M, Yan R, Wang Z, Yao Y, Li Y, Whitson BA, Duann P, Li H, Zhou X, Zhu H, Takeshima H, Hunter JC, McLeod RL, Weisleder N, Zeng C, Ma J - Nat Commun (2014)

Expression of MG53 in lung tissue. A. Homogenates of lung tissue derived from the wild type and mg53−/− mice were used for western blot for detection of MG53. 0.1 ng rhMG53 was used as positive control. For comparative purpose, the content of MG53 in skeletal muscle was assayed at different concentrations of muscle tissues. Ponceau S staining reveals differential loading of the skeletal muscle and lung tissues. A nonspecific 40 kDa protein was also recognized by our custom-made anti-MG53 antibody. The uncropped western blots images are shown on Supplementary Fig 1. B. Characterization of lung mg53 transcripts by RACE cDNA amplification. The cDNA amplification strategy is illustrated in the upper panel. A mouse lung cDNA preparation was amplified using AP1 and MA1 primers in the 5’-RACE reaction or using MS1 and AP1 primers in the 3’-RACE reaction. Amplified cDNA products in each RACE reaction were analyzed in agarose electrophoresis as shown in the lower panel. Putative full-length cDNAs marked with asterisks were extracted from agarose gels and subcloned into a plasmid vector for sequencing. The protein-coding sequence of the amplified lung mg53 cDNAs was identical to that of muscle mg53 cDNAs determined in our previous study. C. IHC staining with an anti-MG53 antibody revealed high level of MG53 in wild type skeletal muscle, which is absent in the mg53−/−muscle. D-F. IHC staining of lung tissues derived from wild type (left panels) or mg53−/− mice (right panels). Compared with skeletal muscle, low level of MG53 could be detected in lung (D). Background staining in the mg53−/− lung likely reflects auto fluorescence of capillary cells or non-specific activity of the anti-MG53 antibody (see the 40 kDa band in panel A). The MG53 expression pattern in wild type lung matches to that of AT1α, a type I alveolar cell marker (E). The MG53 and AT1α (type 1a angiotensin II receptor) (anti-AT1α, Novus Biologicals NB600-1015) stainings (D and E) were shown separately to better indicate the localization of MG53 due to its low expression in alveolar cells. The cross section of bronchioles revealed negative staining for MG53 in both airway smooth muscle layer (arrow) and the neighboring ciliated endothelial lining of the airway lumen (arrow head) (F). All scale bars represent 50 μm. G. Immunoblotting of MG53 with lysates from mouse lung tissues, and cells derived from A549, PPAEC, MVEC-L and HUVEC (50 μg/lane). 1 ng rhMG53 served as a positive control for the immunoblotting.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4109002&req=5

Figure 1: Expression of MG53 in lung tissue. A. Homogenates of lung tissue derived from the wild type and mg53−/− mice were used for western blot for detection of MG53. 0.1 ng rhMG53 was used as positive control. For comparative purpose, the content of MG53 in skeletal muscle was assayed at different concentrations of muscle tissues. Ponceau S staining reveals differential loading of the skeletal muscle and lung tissues. A nonspecific 40 kDa protein was also recognized by our custom-made anti-MG53 antibody. The uncropped western blots images are shown on Supplementary Fig 1. B. Characterization of lung mg53 transcripts by RACE cDNA amplification. The cDNA amplification strategy is illustrated in the upper panel. A mouse lung cDNA preparation was amplified using AP1 and MA1 primers in the 5’-RACE reaction or using MS1 and AP1 primers in the 3’-RACE reaction. Amplified cDNA products in each RACE reaction were analyzed in agarose electrophoresis as shown in the lower panel. Putative full-length cDNAs marked with asterisks were extracted from agarose gels and subcloned into a plasmid vector for sequencing. The protein-coding sequence of the amplified lung mg53 cDNAs was identical to that of muscle mg53 cDNAs determined in our previous study. C. IHC staining with an anti-MG53 antibody revealed high level of MG53 in wild type skeletal muscle, which is absent in the mg53−/−muscle. D-F. IHC staining of lung tissues derived from wild type (left panels) or mg53−/− mice (right panels). Compared with skeletal muscle, low level of MG53 could be detected in lung (D). Background staining in the mg53−/− lung likely reflects auto fluorescence of capillary cells or non-specific activity of the anti-MG53 antibody (see the 40 kDa band in panel A). The MG53 expression pattern in wild type lung matches to that of AT1α, a type I alveolar cell marker (E). The MG53 and AT1α (type 1a angiotensin II receptor) (anti-AT1α, Novus Biologicals NB600-1015) stainings (D and E) were shown separately to better indicate the localization of MG53 due to its low expression in alveolar cells. The cross section of bronchioles revealed negative staining for MG53 in both airway smooth muscle layer (arrow) and the neighboring ciliated endothelial lining of the airway lumen (arrow head) (F). All scale bars represent 50 μm. G. Immunoblotting of MG53 with lysates from mouse lung tissues, and cells derived from A549, PPAEC, MVEC-L and HUVEC (50 μg/lane). 1 ng rhMG53 served as a positive control for the immunoblotting.
Mentions: The mg53 gene was originally cloned from skeletal muscle using an immuno-proteomics approach20. Biochemical studies showed that MG53 protein is enriched in striated muscles5, 7, 21. Here we tested whether MG53 protein is also expressed in the lung. Western blot showed that MG53 could only be detected in lysates of lung tissue derived from the wild type mice, but not in the mg53−/− lung homogenate (Fig. 1A and Supplementary Fig. 1). Quantitative assessment revealed that the level of MG53 protein in the lung tissue is approximately 5% of that in skeletal muscle.

Bottom Line: Here we show that MG53 also has a physiological role in the lung and may be used as a treatment in animal models of acute lung injury.Intravenous delivery or inhalation of rhMG53 reduces symptoms in rodent models of acute lung injury and emphysema.Our data indicate a physiological function for MG53 in the lung and suggest that targeting membrane repair may be an effective means for treatment or prevention of lung diseases.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] Department of Respiratory and Immunology, Merck Research Lab, Kenilworth, New Jersey 07033, USA [2].

ABSTRACT
Injury to lung epithelial cells has a role in multiple lung diseases. We previously identified mitsugumin 53 (MG53) as a component of the cell membrane repair machinery in striated muscle cells. Here we show that MG53 also has a physiological role in the lung and may be used as a treatment in animal models of acute lung injury. Mice lacking MG53 show increased susceptibility to ischaemia-reperfusion and overventilation-induced injury to the lung when compared with wild-type mice. Extracellular application of recombinant human MG53 (rhMG53) protein protects cultured lung epithelial cells against anoxia/reoxygenation-induced injuries. Intravenous delivery or inhalation of rhMG53 reduces symptoms in rodent models of acute lung injury and emphysema. Repetitive administration of rhMG53 improves pulmonary structure associated with chronic lung injury in mice. Our data indicate a physiological function for MG53 in the lung and suggest that targeting membrane repair may be an effective means for treatment or prevention of lung diseases.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus