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Food and social complexity at Çayönü Tepesi, southeastern Anatolia: Stable isotope evidence of differentiation in diet according to burial practice and sex in the early Neolithic.

Pearson J, Grove M, Ozbek M, Hongo H - J Anthropol Archaeol (2013)

Bottom Line: We took 540 human and animal bone samples for stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis from the Neolithic site of Çayönü Tepesi in southeastern Anatolia.The inhabitants at this site chose to bury their dead in two different ways at different times during its occupation: beneath the floors of their houses, but also inside a public mortuary building known as the Skull Building.We show that when the inhabitants of Çayönü Tepesi changed their architecture and operated different burial practices in conjunction, this coincided with other aspects of behaviour including socially-constituted food consumption practices, which served to reinforce social identities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology, Hartley Building, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GS, UK.

ABSTRACT
The identification of early social complexity and differentiation in early village societies has been approached in the past most notably through the evaluation of rituals and architectural layouts. Such studies could be complemented by an approach that provides data about everyday behaviours of individuals. We took 540 human and animal bone samples for stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis from the Neolithic site of Çayönü Tepesi in southeastern Anatolia. The inhabitants at this site chose to bury their dead in two different ways at different times during its occupation: beneath the floors of their houses, but also inside a public mortuary building known as the Skull Building. This variation provides an opportunity using isotope methods to test whether there was evidence for structuring of daily activities (diet in this case) that might serve to reinforce this change in burial practice. We show that when the inhabitants of Çayönü Tepesi changed their architecture and operated different burial practices in conjunction, this coincided with other aspects of behaviour including socially-constituted food consumption practices, which served to reinforce social identities.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Relative proportion of taxa by sub-phase at Çayönü Tepesi according to %NISP (after Hongo et al., 2009).
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f0005: Relative proportion of taxa by sub-phase at Çayönü Tepesi according to %NISP (after Hongo et al., 2009).

Mentions: Çayönü Tepesi is located on the Ergani plain in southeastern Turkey, approximately 40 km northwest of the modern city of Diyarbakır (Fig. 1). Halet Çambel and Robert Braidwood discovered the site during the 1963 Southeast Anatolia Survey and later excavated it with the aim of understanding the transition from hunting and gathering to farming (Çambel and Braidwood, 1980). Sixteen seasons of excavation were conducted between 1964 and 1991 (the latest years were directed by Mehmet Özdoğan and Aslı Erim Özdoğan), which uncovered over 4500 m2 of archaeological deposits spanning the early Neolithic to the Middle Ages (Özdoğan, 1999). The site is perhaps best known for its Aceramic Neolithic deposits which date from the 9th millennium to the end of the 7th millennium cal BC (Pre Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA) to the final Pre Pottery Neolithic B/PPNC in Levantine terminology).


Food and social complexity at Çayönü Tepesi, southeastern Anatolia: Stable isotope evidence of differentiation in diet according to burial practice and sex in the early Neolithic.

Pearson J, Grove M, Ozbek M, Hongo H - J Anthropol Archaeol (2013)

Relative proportion of taxa by sub-phase at Çayönü Tepesi according to %NISP (after Hongo et al., 2009).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4066944&req=5

f0005: Relative proportion of taxa by sub-phase at Çayönü Tepesi according to %NISP (after Hongo et al., 2009).
Mentions: Çayönü Tepesi is located on the Ergani plain in southeastern Turkey, approximately 40 km northwest of the modern city of Diyarbakır (Fig. 1). Halet Çambel and Robert Braidwood discovered the site during the 1963 Southeast Anatolia Survey and later excavated it with the aim of understanding the transition from hunting and gathering to farming (Çambel and Braidwood, 1980). Sixteen seasons of excavation were conducted between 1964 and 1991 (the latest years were directed by Mehmet Özdoğan and Aslı Erim Özdoğan), which uncovered over 4500 m2 of archaeological deposits spanning the early Neolithic to the Middle Ages (Özdoğan, 1999). The site is perhaps best known for its Aceramic Neolithic deposits which date from the 9th millennium to the end of the 7th millennium cal BC (Pre Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA) to the final Pre Pottery Neolithic B/PPNC in Levantine terminology).

Bottom Line: We took 540 human and animal bone samples for stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis from the Neolithic site of Çayönü Tepesi in southeastern Anatolia.The inhabitants at this site chose to bury their dead in two different ways at different times during its occupation: beneath the floors of their houses, but also inside a public mortuary building known as the Skull Building.We show that when the inhabitants of Çayönü Tepesi changed their architecture and operated different burial practices in conjunction, this coincided with other aspects of behaviour including socially-constituted food consumption practices, which served to reinforce social identities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology, Hartley Building, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GS, UK.

ABSTRACT
The identification of early social complexity and differentiation in early village societies has been approached in the past most notably through the evaluation of rituals and architectural layouts. Such studies could be complemented by an approach that provides data about everyday behaviours of individuals. We took 540 human and animal bone samples for stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis from the Neolithic site of Çayönü Tepesi in southeastern Anatolia. The inhabitants at this site chose to bury their dead in two different ways at different times during its occupation: beneath the floors of their houses, but also inside a public mortuary building known as the Skull Building. This variation provides an opportunity using isotope methods to test whether there was evidence for structuring of daily activities (diet in this case) that might serve to reinforce this change in burial practice. We show that when the inhabitants of Çayönü Tepesi changed their architecture and operated different burial practices in conjunction, this coincided with other aspects of behaviour including socially-constituted food consumption practices, which served to reinforce social identities.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus