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'Plue plun' male, 'kath klei' female: gender differences in suicidal behavior as expressed by young people in Cambodia.

Jegannathan B, Dahlblom K, Kullgren G - Int J Cult Ment Health (2013)

Bottom Line: The data was analyzed using thematic analysis approach.Parental attitude and family environment were also pointed out as the chief causes of discontent and there was a strong wish on the part of young people to find space for modern values within the traditional family.The young people's awareness of their challenges in everyday life suggests that school-based programs to prevent suicidal behavior ought to be gender-sensitive and peer-focused.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Chey Chumneas Hospital, Takhmau, Cambodia.

ABSTRACT
Few studies from low- and middle-income countries use qualitative methodology to explore suicidal behavior among young people. In Cambodia, young people face the challenge of rapidly changing times and are vulnerable for suicidal behavior as revealed by research in transitional economies. This study seeks to gain a deeper understanding of the suicidal phenomena from a gender, psychosocial and cultural perspective. Six focus-group discussions were conducted among boys and girls, aged 15-19 years, in two secondary schools in a suburban area close to Phnom Penh, the capital city. The data was analyzed using thematic analysis approach. The participants highlighted the gender difference in suicidal behavior by describing the suicide-prone, acting-out male as 'plue plun', while suicide-prone females were described as caught in constricted, tunneled-thinking behavior, expressed as 'kath klei'. Parental attitude and family environment were also pointed out as the chief causes of discontent and there was a strong wish on the part of young people to find space for modern values within the traditional family. The young people's awareness of their challenges in everyday life suggests that school-based programs to prevent suicidal behavior ought to be gender-sensitive and peer-focused.

No MeSH data available.


Codes and sub-themes related to negotiating for space with and in the family.
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Figure 1: Codes and sub-themes related to negotiating for space with and in the family.

Mentions: An overview of codes and subthemes are shown in Figure 1.


'Plue plun' male, 'kath klei' female: gender differences in suicidal behavior as expressed by young people in Cambodia.

Jegannathan B, Dahlblom K, Kullgren G - Int J Cult Ment Health (2013)

Codes and sub-themes related to negotiating for space with and in the family.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4066927&req=5

Figure 1: Codes and sub-themes related to negotiating for space with and in the family.
Mentions: An overview of codes and subthemes are shown in Figure 1.

Bottom Line: The data was analyzed using thematic analysis approach.Parental attitude and family environment were also pointed out as the chief causes of discontent and there was a strong wish on the part of young people to find space for modern values within the traditional family.The young people's awareness of their challenges in everyday life suggests that school-based programs to prevent suicidal behavior ought to be gender-sensitive and peer-focused.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Chey Chumneas Hospital, Takhmau, Cambodia.

ABSTRACT
Few studies from low- and middle-income countries use qualitative methodology to explore suicidal behavior among young people. In Cambodia, young people face the challenge of rapidly changing times and are vulnerable for suicidal behavior as revealed by research in transitional economies. This study seeks to gain a deeper understanding of the suicidal phenomena from a gender, psychosocial and cultural perspective. Six focus-group discussions were conducted among boys and girls, aged 15-19 years, in two secondary schools in a suburban area close to Phnom Penh, the capital city. The data was analyzed using thematic analysis approach. The participants highlighted the gender difference in suicidal behavior by describing the suicide-prone, acting-out male as 'plue plun', while suicide-prone females were described as caught in constricted, tunneled-thinking behavior, expressed as 'kath klei'. Parental attitude and family environment were also pointed out as the chief causes of discontent and there was a strong wish on the part of young people to find space for modern values within the traditional family. The young people's awareness of their challenges in everyday life suggests that school-based programs to prevent suicidal behavior ought to be gender-sensitive and peer-focused.

No MeSH data available.