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Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome due to hyponatremia.

Jeon JS, Park SP, Seo JG - J Epilepsy Res (2014)

Bottom Line: The PRES may occur in diverse situations.The findings on neuroimaging in PRES are often symmetric and predominate edema in the white matter of the brain areas perfused by the posterior brain circulation, which is reversible when the underlying cause is treated.We report the case of PRES in normotensive patient with hyponatremia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University.

ABSTRACT
Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is characterized by variable associations of seizure activity, consciousness impairment, headaches, visual abnormalities, nausea/vomiting, and focal neurological signs. The PRES may occur in diverse situations. The findings on neuroimaging in PRES are often symmetric and predominate edema in the white matter of the brain areas perfused by the posterior brain circulation, which is reversible when the underlying cause is treated. We report the case of PRES in normotensive patient with hyponatremia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) Axial fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR images demonstrate bilateral hyperintense lesions in the parietooccipital and frontal lesions affecting the cortex and subcortical white matter which consistent patterns with vasogenic edema. (B) Axial fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR images show that the lesions have much improved after 1 month.
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f1-er-4-1-31-8: (A) Axial fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR images demonstrate bilateral hyperintense lesions in the parietooccipital and frontal lesions affecting the cortex and subcortical white matter which consistent patterns with vasogenic edema. (B) Axial fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR images show that the lesions have much improved after 1 month.

Mentions: In laboratory test, she showed hyponatremia, which is 124 mmol/L. Cerebrospinal fluid study revealed normal, which was performed to exclude central nervous system infection. Electroencephalography showed 5–6 Hz diffuse background slowing and there was no epileptiform discharges. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed bilaterally diffuse abnormal signal intensities in the parieto-occipital lobe and superior frontal sulcus, which involved predominantly the deep white matter (Fig. 1A). All these changes showed hyperintense on T2-weighted and FLAIR images. There was no enhancement in meninges and brain parenchyme. Her clinical symptoms and brain MRI findings suggested the possibility of PRES.


Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome due to hyponatremia.

Jeon JS, Park SP, Seo JG - J Epilepsy Res (2014)

(A) Axial fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR images demonstrate bilateral hyperintense lesions in the parietooccipital and frontal lesions affecting the cortex and subcortical white matter which consistent patterns with vasogenic edema. (B) Axial fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR images show that the lesions have much improved after 1 month.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4066623&req=5

f1-er-4-1-31-8: (A) Axial fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR images demonstrate bilateral hyperintense lesions in the parietooccipital and frontal lesions affecting the cortex and subcortical white matter which consistent patterns with vasogenic edema. (B) Axial fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR images show that the lesions have much improved after 1 month.
Mentions: In laboratory test, she showed hyponatremia, which is 124 mmol/L. Cerebrospinal fluid study revealed normal, which was performed to exclude central nervous system infection. Electroencephalography showed 5–6 Hz diffuse background slowing and there was no epileptiform discharges. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed bilaterally diffuse abnormal signal intensities in the parieto-occipital lobe and superior frontal sulcus, which involved predominantly the deep white matter (Fig. 1A). All these changes showed hyperintense on T2-weighted and FLAIR images. There was no enhancement in meninges and brain parenchyme. Her clinical symptoms and brain MRI findings suggested the possibility of PRES.

Bottom Line: The PRES may occur in diverse situations.The findings on neuroimaging in PRES are often symmetric and predominate edema in the white matter of the brain areas perfused by the posterior brain circulation, which is reversible when the underlying cause is treated.We report the case of PRES in normotensive patient with hyponatremia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University.

ABSTRACT
Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is characterized by variable associations of seizure activity, consciousness impairment, headaches, visual abnormalities, nausea/vomiting, and focal neurological signs. The PRES may occur in diverse situations. The findings on neuroimaging in PRES are often symmetric and predominate edema in the white matter of the brain areas perfused by the posterior brain circulation, which is reversible when the underlying cause is treated. We report the case of PRES in normotensive patient with hyponatremia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus