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Genome rearrangements and pervasive meiotic drive cause hybrid infertility in fission yeast.

Zanders SE, Eickbush MT, Yu JS, Kang JW, Fowler KR, Smith GR, Malik HS - Elife (2014)

Bottom Line: Hybrid sterility is one of the earliest postzygotic isolating mechanisms to evolve between two recently diverged species.Two of these driving loci are linked by a chromosomal translocation and thus constitute a novel type of paired meiotic drive complex.Our study reveals how quickly multiple barriers to fertility can arise.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Basic Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, United States.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Genotype of recombinant strains used in Figure 8.We sequenced these two genomes to determine which parent (Sk or Sp) contributed which components of the genome using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to distinguish them. Both strains have the Sk karyotype. The black/grey indicates DNA that is located on chromosome 1 in Sp, blue indicates DNA that is located on chromosome 2 in Sp and red indicates DNA that is located on chromosome 3 in Sp. (A) Strain KRK has only Sk alleles on chromosomes 1 and 3. Chromosome 2 in this strain was generated by a crossover between Sk and Sp between SNPs 2,113,023 and 2,115,195 (which flank the mat1 locus). (B) Strain KKR has only Sk alleles on chromosome 1. On chromosome 2 only the left-most tip has Sp alleles. This chromosome was generated by a recombination event between Sk chromosome 2 and Sp chromosome 3. The crossover occurred between SNPs at positions 2,290,808 and 2,292,393 on Sp chromosome 3. Chromosome 3 in this strain was generated by a recombination event between Sk chromosome 3 and Sp chromosome 3 that occurred between SNPs located at positions 1,558,635 and 1,559,674 on Sp chromosome 3.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02630.031
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fig8s1: Genotype of recombinant strains used in Figure 8.We sequenced these two genomes to determine which parent (Sk or Sp) contributed which components of the genome using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to distinguish them. Both strains have the Sk karyotype. The black/grey indicates DNA that is located on chromosome 1 in Sp, blue indicates DNA that is located on chromosome 2 in Sp and red indicates DNA that is located on chromosome 3 in Sp. (A) Strain KRK has only Sk alleles on chromosomes 1 and 3. Chromosome 2 in this strain was generated by a crossover between Sk and Sp between SNPs 2,113,023 and 2,115,195 (which flank the mat1 locus). (B) Strain KKR has only Sk alleles on chromosome 1. On chromosome 2 only the left-most tip has Sp alleles. This chromosome was generated by a recombination event between Sk chromosome 2 and Sp chromosome 3. The crossover occurred between SNPs at positions 2,290,808 and 2,292,393 on Sp chromosome 3. Chromosome 3 in this strain was generated by a recombination event between Sk chromosome 3 and Sp chromosome 3 that occurred between SNPs located at positions 1,558,635 and 1,559,674 on Sp chromosome 3.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02630.031

Mentions: Given the observed reciprocal incompatibility between Sk and Sp chromosomes 2 and 3 due to the translocation, we reasoned that the observed drive phenotypes of Sk alleles on these chromosomes could be interdependent. This scenario is easiest to understand in the rec12Δ crosses, which are not complicated by recombination. For example, if allele(s) on K2 drive, K3 may appear to drive just because spores that inherit K2 and P3 are inviable. The converse could also be true. This line of thinking inspired us to test whether each Sk chromosome can drive independently, in the absence of drive on the other two chromosomes. We used rec12Δ strains to eliminate recombination-associated phenotypes. To test for the ability of K1 to drive autonomously, we crossed a P1 K2 K3 strain (obtained from a rec12Δ hybrid cross) to a naïve K1 K2 K3 strain to generate a P1 K2 K3/K1 K2 K3 diploid. We found that even in these diploids, which were heterozygous for only chromosome 1, the K1 chromosome showed the drive phenotype (G-test p<0.01 Figure 8A, Figure 8—figure supplement 1), proving that the driving allele on K1 can act even in the absence of K2 and K3 drive.10.7554/eLife.02630.030Figure 8.Sk drive alleles are autonomous and contribute to hybrid infertility.


Genome rearrangements and pervasive meiotic drive cause hybrid infertility in fission yeast.

Zanders SE, Eickbush MT, Yu JS, Kang JW, Fowler KR, Smith GR, Malik HS - Elife (2014)

Genotype of recombinant strains used in Figure 8.We sequenced these two genomes to determine which parent (Sk or Sp) contributed which components of the genome using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to distinguish them. Both strains have the Sk karyotype. The black/grey indicates DNA that is located on chromosome 1 in Sp, blue indicates DNA that is located on chromosome 2 in Sp and red indicates DNA that is located on chromosome 3 in Sp. (A) Strain KRK has only Sk alleles on chromosomes 1 and 3. Chromosome 2 in this strain was generated by a crossover between Sk and Sp between SNPs 2,113,023 and 2,115,195 (which flank the mat1 locus). (B) Strain KKR has only Sk alleles on chromosome 1. On chromosome 2 only the left-most tip has Sp alleles. This chromosome was generated by a recombination event between Sk chromosome 2 and Sp chromosome 3. The crossover occurred between SNPs at positions 2,290,808 and 2,292,393 on Sp chromosome 3. Chromosome 3 in this strain was generated by a recombination event between Sk chromosome 3 and Sp chromosome 3 that occurred between SNPs located at positions 1,558,635 and 1,559,674 on Sp chromosome 3.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02630.031
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4066438&req=5

fig8s1: Genotype of recombinant strains used in Figure 8.We sequenced these two genomes to determine which parent (Sk or Sp) contributed which components of the genome using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to distinguish them. Both strains have the Sk karyotype. The black/grey indicates DNA that is located on chromosome 1 in Sp, blue indicates DNA that is located on chromosome 2 in Sp and red indicates DNA that is located on chromosome 3 in Sp. (A) Strain KRK has only Sk alleles on chromosomes 1 and 3. Chromosome 2 in this strain was generated by a crossover between Sk and Sp between SNPs 2,113,023 and 2,115,195 (which flank the mat1 locus). (B) Strain KKR has only Sk alleles on chromosome 1. On chromosome 2 only the left-most tip has Sp alleles. This chromosome was generated by a recombination event between Sk chromosome 2 and Sp chromosome 3. The crossover occurred between SNPs at positions 2,290,808 and 2,292,393 on Sp chromosome 3. Chromosome 3 in this strain was generated by a recombination event between Sk chromosome 3 and Sp chromosome 3 that occurred between SNPs located at positions 1,558,635 and 1,559,674 on Sp chromosome 3.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02630.031
Mentions: Given the observed reciprocal incompatibility between Sk and Sp chromosomes 2 and 3 due to the translocation, we reasoned that the observed drive phenotypes of Sk alleles on these chromosomes could be interdependent. This scenario is easiest to understand in the rec12Δ crosses, which are not complicated by recombination. For example, if allele(s) on K2 drive, K3 may appear to drive just because spores that inherit K2 and P3 are inviable. The converse could also be true. This line of thinking inspired us to test whether each Sk chromosome can drive independently, in the absence of drive on the other two chromosomes. We used rec12Δ strains to eliminate recombination-associated phenotypes. To test for the ability of K1 to drive autonomously, we crossed a P1 K2 K3 strain (obtained from a rec12Δ hybrid cross) to a naïve K1 K2 K3 strain to generate a P1 K2 K3/K1 K2 K3 diploid. We found that even in these diploids, which were heterozygous for only chromosome 1, the K1 chromosome showed the drive phenotype (G-test p<0.01 Figure 8A, Figure 8—figure supplement 1), proving that the driving allele on K1 can act even in the absence of K2 and K3 drive.10.7554/eLife.02630.030Figure 8.Sk drive alleles are autonomous and contribute to hybrid infertility.

Bottom Line: Hybrid sterility is one of the earliest postzygotic isolating mechanisms to evolve between two recently diverged species.Two of these driving loci are linked by a chromosomal translocation and thus constitute a novel type of paired meiotic drive complex.Our study reveals how quickly multiple barriers to fertility can arise.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Basic Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, United States.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus