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Enduring influence of elizabethan ophthalmic texts of the 1580s: bailey, grassus, and guillemeau.

Leffler CT, Schwartz SG, Davenport B, Randolph J, Busscher J, Hadi T - Open Ophthalmol J (2014)

Bottom Line: Although not previously realized, major elements of all 3 works are found in Two Treatises Concerning the Preseruation of Eie-sight, first published in 1616.Links are found between Grassus, Guillemeau, and eighteenth century glaucoma concepts.The three primary ophthalmic texts of 1580s England influenced ophthalmic thought for over a century.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Virginia Commonwealth University, 401 N. 11th St., Box 980209, Richmond, VA 23298, USA.

ABSTRACT
Three English ophthalmic texts of the 1580s were frequently republished: 1) Walter Bailey's A Briefe Treatise Touching the Preseruation of the Eie Sight, 2) The Method of Phisicke, an adaptation of the medieval treatise of Benevenutus Grassus, and 3) A Worthy Treatise of the Eyes, a translation of Jacques Guillemeau's treatise. Their history is intertwined through composite publications, some of which lacked clear attribution. At least 21 editions incorporated these texts. Although not previously realized, major elements of all 3 works are found in Two Treatises Concerning the Preseruation of Eie-sight, first published in 1616. To preserve eyesight, Bailey recommended eyebright (Euphrasia officinalis), fennel (Fæniculum vulgare), and a moderate lifestyle incorporating wine. In the works of Grassus and Guillemeau, cataracts were believed to lie anterior to the 'crystalline humor,' and were treated by the 'art of the needle,' or couching. Links are found between Grassus, Guillemeau, and eighteenth century glaucoma concepts. Although one of his students has traditionally received credit, it was English oculist John Thomas Woolhouse who first combined the early concepts and used the term glaucoma to describe the palpably hard eye in the early eighteenth century. The three primary ophthalmic texts of 1580s England influenced ophthalmic thought for over a century.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Title page to Two Treatises, appended to William Vaughan’s Directions for Health in 1626 [19]. This composite text incorporates major elements of all three principal ophthalmic texts of the 1580’s (Bailey [1], Grassus [3], and Guillemeau [7]).
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Figure 2: Title page to Two Treatises, appended to William Vaughan’s Directions for Health in 1626 [19]. This composite text incorporates major elements of all three principal ophthalmic texts of the 1580’s (Bailey [1], Grassus [3], and Guillemeau [7]).

Mentions: Several composite works incorporated the above texts. Two Treatises, published in 1616, 1626, and 1633 [18-19] incorporated all three (Fig. 2). The first treatise was a reprint of Bailey’s. The second treatise, which has curious origins, is labeled as being from the French physicians Jean Fernel and Jean Riolan. The section on needling the cataract is from the rendition of Grassus in Methode of Phisicke [5]. Our analysis confirmed that much of the work, consisting of a broad overview of eye diseases and recipes for collyria (an eye wash), is a translation of Riolan (see Appendix). We also determined, perhaps for the first time, that the sections on hypopyon, amaurosis, ophthalmia, and pathophysiology of cataract are taken directly from Worthy Treatise, the translation of Guillemeau (see Appendix).


Enduring influence of elizabethan ophthalmic texts of the 1580s: bailey, grassus, and guillemeau.

Leffler CT, Schwartz SG, Davenport B, Randolph J, Busscher J, Hadi T - Open Ophthalmol J (2014)

Title page to Two Treatises, appended to William Vaughan’s Directions for Health in 1626 [19]. This composite text incorporates major elements of all three principal ophthalmic texts of the 1580’s (Bailey [1], Grassus [3], and Guillemeau [7]).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4066364&req=5

Figure 2: Title page to Two Treatises, appended to William Vaughan’s Directions for Health in 1626 [19]. This composite text incorporates major elements of all three principal ophthalmic texts of the 1580’s (Bailey [1], Grassus [3], and Guillemeau [7]).
Mentions: Several composite works incorporated the above texts. Two Treatises, published in 1616, 1626, and 1633 [18-19] incorporated all three (Fig. 2). The first treatise was a reprint of Bailey’s. The second treatise, which has curious origins, is labeled as being from the French physicians Jean Fernel and Jean Riolan. The section on needling the cataract is from the rendition of Grassus in Methode of Phisicke [5]. Our analysis confirmed that much of the work, consisting of a broad overview of eye diseases and recipes for collyria (an eye wash), is a translation of Riolan (see Appendix). We also determined, perhaps for the first time, that the sections on hypopyon, amaurosis, ophthalmia, and pathophysiology of cataract are taken directly from Worthy Treatise, the translation of Guillemeau (see Appendix).

Bottom Line: Although not previously realized, major elements of all 3 works are found in Two Treatises Concerning the Preseruation of Eie-sight, first published in 1616.Links are found between Grassus, Guillemeau, and eighteenth century glaucoma concepts.The three primary ophthalmic texts of 1580s England influenced ophthalmic thought for over a century.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Virginia Commonwealth University, 401 N. 11th St., Box 980209, Richmond, VA 23298, USA.

ABSTRACT
Three English ophthalmic texts of the 1580s were frequently republished: 1) Walter Bailey's A Briefe Treatise Touching the Preseruation of the Eie Sight, 2) The Method of Phisicke, an adaptation of the medieval treatise of Benevenutus Grassus, and 3) A Worthy Treatise of the Eyes, a translation of Jacques Guillemeau's treatise. Their history is intertwined through composite publications, some of which lacked clear attribution. At least 21 editions incorporated these texts. Although not previously realized, major elements of all 3 works are found in Two Treatises Concerning the Preseruation of Eie-sight, first published in 1616. To preserve eyesight, Bailey recommended eyebright (Euphrasia officinalis), fennel (Fæniculum vulgare), and a moderate lifestyle incorporating wine. In the works of Grassus and Guillemeau, cataracts were believed to lie anterior to the 'crystalline humor,' and were treated by the 'art of the needle,' or couching. Links are found between Grassus, Guillemeau, and eighteenth century glaucoma concepts. Although one of his students has traditionally received credit, it was English oculist John Thomas Woolhouse who first combined the early concepts and used the term glaucoma to describe the palpably hard eye in the early eighteenth century. The three primary ophthalmic texts of 1580s England influenced ophthalmic thought for over a century.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus