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Perspectives of breast cancer thermotherapies.

Alphandéry E - J Cancer (2014)

Bottom Line: In this article, the use of different types of thermotherapies to treat breast cancer is reviewed.While hyperthermia is most commonly used as an adjuvant in combination with radiotherapy, chemotherapy, targeted therapy or cryotherapy to enhance the therapeutic effect of these therapies, thermoablation is usually carried out alone to eradicate small breast tumors.A recently developed thermotherapy, called magnetic hyperthermia, which involves localized heating of nanoparticles under the application of an alternating magnetic field, is also presented.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1. Nanobacterie SARL, 36 boulevard Flandrin, 75116, Paris, France. ; 2. Institut de Minéralogie et de Physique des Milieux Condensés, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, 75005, Paris, France.

ABSTRACT
In this article, the use of different types of thermotherapies to treat breast cancer is reviewed. While hyperthermia is most commonly used as an adjuvant in combination with radiotherapy, chemotherapy, targeted therapy or cryotherapy to enhance the therapeutic effect of these therapies, thermoablation is usually carried out alone to eradicate small breast tumors. A recently developed thermotherapy, called magnetic hyperthermia, which involves localized heating of nanoparticles under the application of an alternating magnetic field, is also presented. The advantages and drawbacks of these different thermotherapies are highlighted.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic diagrams showing the different steps of a typical treatment involving magnetic hyperthermia.
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Figure 1: Schematic diagrams showing the different steps of a typical treatment involving magnetic hyperthermia.

Mentions: Usually, chemically synthesized nanoparticles used to carry out magnetic hyperthermia on BC are small, typically less than 20 nm, made of maghemite or magnetite and superparamagnetic, which means that they possess a thermally unstable magnetic moment, 51-56. Magnetic hyperthermia has successfully been tested on breast tumors xeno-grafted under the skin of mice. For that, 1 to 2 mg of nanoparticles, 51-53, have been administered either intravenously, 51, 52, or directly to tumors, 53, of typical sizes 100 to 200 mm3, 51, 52. Specific targeting of the tumors was achieved by using 111InCh antibody, 51, 52, or anti-HER2 molecules attached either to the nanoparticles, 53-55, or to the liposomes containing the nanoparticles, 56. In order to generate heat, the nanoparticles were exposed to an alternating magnetic field of strength 12-130 mT and frequency of 118-360 kHz during 20-30 minutes, 51-56. The efficacy of these preclinical treatments was revealed by the disappearance of the tumors, 51-56. Clinical trials using magnetic hyperthermia are ongoing at the University of Nagoya to treat BC. Figure 1 shows the different steps, which may be involved in the treatment of BC using magnetic hyperthermia. Breast tumor may first be diagnosed using mammography. The nanoparticle suspension may then be administered to the breast tumor using a syringe. MRI may be used to visualize the nanoparticles during and after the administration of the nanoparticle suspension and to verify the correct location of the nanoparticles in the tumor before and during the treatment. After that, the patient may be positioned inside an instrument that generates an alternating magnetic field and heats the nanoparticles contained in the tumor. After treatment, the variation of the tumor size may be followed by MRI.


Perspectives of breast cancer thermotherapies.

Alphandéry E - J Cancer (2014)

Schematic diagrams showing the different steps of a typical treatment involving magnetic hyperthermia.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4066359&req=5

Figure 1: Schematic diagrams showing the different steps of a typical treatment involving magnetic hyperthermia.
Mentions: Usually, chemically synthesized nanoparticles used to carry out magnetic hyperthermia on BC are small, typically less than 20 nm, made of maghemite or magnetite and superparamagnetic, which means that they possess a thermally unstable magnetic moment, 51-56. Magnetic hyperthermia has successfully been tested on breast tumors xeno-grafted under the skin of mice. For that, 1 to 2 mg of nanoparticles, 51-53, have been administered either intravenously, 51, 52, or directly to tumors, 53, of typical sizes 100 to 200 mm3, 51, 52. Specific targeting of the tumors was achieved by using 111InCh antibody, 51, 52, or anti-HER2 molecules attached either to the nanoparticles, 53-55, or to the liposomes containing the nanoparticles, 56. In order to generate heat, the nanoparticles were exposed to an alternating magnetic field of strength 12-130 mT and frequency of 118-360 kHz during 20-30 minutes, 51-56. The efficacy of these preclinical treatments was revealed by the disappearance of the tumors, 51-56. Clinical trials using magnetic hyperthermia are ongoing at the University of Nagoya to treat BC. Figure 1 shows the different steps, which may be involved in the treatment of BC using magnetic hyperthermia. Breast tumor may first be diagnosed using mammography. The nanoparticle suspension may then be administered to the breast tumor using a syringe. MRI may be used to visualize the nanoparticles during and after the administration of the nanoparticle suspension and to verify the correct location of the nanoparticles in the tumor before and during the treatment. After that, the patient may be positioned inside an instrument that generates an alternating magnetic field and heats the nanoparticles contained in the tumor. After treatment, the variation of the tumor size may be followed by MRI.

Bottom Line: In this article, the use of different types of thermotherapies to treat breast cancer is reviewed.While hyperthermia is most commonly used as an adjuvant in combination with radiotherapy, chemotherapy, targeted therapy or cryotherapy to enhance the therapeutic effect of these therapies, thermoablation is usually carried out alone to eradicate small breast tumors.A recently developed thermotherapy, called magnetic hyperthermia, which involves localized heating of nanoparticles under the application of an alternating magnetic field, is also presented.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1. Nanobacterie SARL, 36 boulevard Flandrin, 75116, Paris, France. ; 2. Institut de Minéralogie et de Physique des Milieux Condensés, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, 75005, Paris, France.

ABSTRACT
In this article, the use of different types of thermotherapies to treat breast cancer is reviewed. While hyperthermia is most commonly used as an adjuvant in combination with radiotherapy, chemotherapy, targeted therapy or cryotherapy to enhance the therapeutic effect of these therapies, thermoablation is usually carried out alone to eradicate small breast tumors. A recently developed thermotherapy, called magnetic hyperthermia, which involves localized heating of nanoparticles under the application of an alternating magnetic field, is also presented. The advantages and drawbacks of these different thermotherapies are highlighted.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus