Limits...
Role of vascular oxidative stress in obesity and metabolic syndrome.

Youn JY, Siu KL, Lob HE, Itani H, Harrison DG, Cai H - Diabetes (2014)

Bottom Line: Obesity is associated with vascular diseases that are often attributed to vascular oxidative stress.This was associated with development of glucose intolerance, reduced HDL cholesterol, and increased levels of leptin and MCP-1.In conclusion, these data indicate that vascular oxidative stress induces obesity and metabolic syndrome, accompanied by and likely due to exercise intolerance, vascular inflammation, and augmented adipogenesis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Molecular Medicine and Cardiology, Cardiovascular Research Laboratories, Departments of Anesthesiology and Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Decreased spontaneous activity accompanied by mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle of high-fat–fed tgsm/p22phox mice. A: Spontaneous activity was monitored over 8 weeks of high-fat diet feeding and progressively declined in the tgsm/p22phox mice while remaining constant in the WT mice. B: Mitochondrial fraction from skeletal muscle was prepared as described in Research Design and Methods and subjected to superoxide detection using electron spin resonance. Mitochondrial superoxide production from high-fat diet–fed tgsm/p22phox mice was increased more than threefold compared with WT controls fed high-fat diet. C: Calcium-induced swelling of skeletal muscle mitochondria was significantly augmented in high-fat diet–fed tgsm/p22phox mice compared with WT controls fed high-fat diet. n = 11–13. Data are presented as mean ± SEM.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4066332&req=5

Figure 7: Decreased spontaneous activity accompanied by mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle of high-fat–fed tgsm/p22phox mice. A: Spontaneous activity was monitored over 8 weeks of high-fat diet feeding and progressively declined in the tgsm/p22phox mice while remaining constant in the WT mice. B: Mitochondrial fraction from skeletal muscle was prepared as described in Research Design and Methods and subjected to superoxide detection using electron spin resonance. Mitochondrial superoxide production from high-fat diet–fed tgsm/p22phox mice was increased more than threefold compared with WT controls fed high-fat diet. C: Calcium-induced swelling of skeletal muscle mitochondria was significantly augmented in high-fat diet–fed tgsm/p22phox mice compared with WT controls fed high-fat diet. n = 11–13. Data are presented as mean ± SEM.

Mentions: Because tgsm/p22phox and WT mice had similar energy intake during high-fat feeding, we considered the possibility that excessive weight gain in tgsm/p22phox mice is due to alterations in energy utilization. To examine this, we monitored nocturnal spontaneous activity using a video monitoring system. As shown in Fig. 7A, the spontaneous activity was similar between tgsm/p22phox and WT mice before high-fat feeding. Whereas high-fat feeding did not change spontaneous activity in WT mice, it induced a significant and graduate decline in spontaneous activity in high-fat diet–fed tgsm/p22phox animals.


Role of vascular oxidative stress in obesity and metabolic syndrome.

Youn JY, Siu KL, Lob HE, Itani H, Harrison DG, Cai H - Diabetes (2014)

Decreased spontaneous activity accompanied by mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle of high-fat–fed tgsm/p22phox mice. A: Spontaneous activity was monitored over 8 weeks of high-fat diet feeding and progressively declined in the tgsm/p22phox mice while remaining constant in the WT mice. B: Mitochondrial fraction from skeletal muscle was prepared as described in Research Design and Methods and subjected to superoxide detection using electron spin resonance. Mitochondrial superoxide production from high-fat diet–fed tgsm/p22phox mice was increased more than threefold compared with WT controls fed high-fat diet. C: Calcium-induced swelling of skeletal muscle mitochondria was significantly augmented in high-fat diet–fed tgsm/p22phox mice compared with WT controls fed high-fat diet. n = 11–13. Data are presented as mean ± SEM.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4066332&req=5

Figure 7: Decreased spontaneous activity accompanied by mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle of high-fat–fed tgsm/p22phox mice. A: Spontaneous activity was monitored over 8 weeks of high-fat diet feeding and progressively declined in the tgsm/p22phox mice while remaining constant in the WT mice. B: Mitochondrial fraction from skeletal muscle was prepared as described in Research Design and Methods and subjected to superoxide detection using electron spin resonance. Mitochondrial superoxide production from high-fat diet–fed tgsm/p22phox mice was increased more than threefold compared with WT controls fed high-fat diet. C: Calcium-induced swelling of skeletal muscle mitochondria was significantly augmented in high-fat diet–fed tgsm/p22phox mice compared with WT controls fed high-fat diet. n = 11–13. Data are presented as mean ± SEM.
Mentions: Because tgsm/p22phox and WT mice had similar energy intake during high-fat feeding, we considered the possibility that excessive weight gain in tgsm/p22phox mice is due to alterations in energy utilization. To examine this, we monitored nocturnal spontaneous activity using a video monitoring system. As shown in Fig. 7A, the spontaneous activity was similar between tgsm/p22phox and WT mice before high-fat feeding. Whereas high-fat feeding did not change spontaneous activity in WT mice, it induced a significant and graduate decline in spontaneous activity in high-fat diet–fed tgsm/p22phox animals.

Bottom Line: Obesity is associated with vascular diseases that are often attributed to vascular oxidative stress.This was associated with development of glucose intolerance, reduced HDL cholesterol, and increased levels of leptin and MCP-1.In conclusion, these data indicate that vascular oxidative stress induces obesity and metabolic syndrome, accompanied by and likely due to exercise intolerance, vascular inflammation, and augmented adipogenesis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Molecular Medicine and Cardiology, Cardiovascular Research Laboratories, Departments of Anesthesiology and Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus