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Pitch and plasticity: insights from the pitch matching of chords by musicians with absolute and relative pitch.

McLachlan NM, Marco DJ, Wilson SJ - Brain Sci (2013)

Bottom Line: Absolute pitch (AP) is a form of sound recognition in which musical note names are associated with discrete musical pitch categories.The dual mechanism model of pitch perception previously proposed by the authors suggests that spectral processing associated with sound recognition primes waveform processing to extract stimulus periodicity and refine pitch perception.The findings presented in this paper are consistent with the dual mechanism model of pitch, and in the case of AP musicians, the formation of nominal pitch categories based on both spectral and periodicity information.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010, Australia. mcln@unimelb.edu.au.

ABSTRACT
Absolute pitch (AP) is a form of sound recognition in which musical note names are associated with discrete musical pitch categories. The accuracy of pitch matching by non-AP musicians for chords has recently been shown to depend on stimulus familiarity, pointing to a role of spectral recognition mechanisms in the early stages of pitch processing. Here we show that pitch matching accuracy by AP musicians was also dependent on their familiarity with the chord stimulus. This suggests that the pitch matching abilities of both AP and non-AP musicians for concurrently presented pitches are dependent on initial recognition of the chord. The dual mechanism model of pitch perception previously proposed by the authors suggests that spectral processing associated with sound recognition primes waveform processing to extract stimulus periodicity and refine pitch perception. The findings presented in this paper are consistent with the dual mechanism model of pitch, and in the case of AP musicians, the formation of nominal pitch categories based on both spectral and periodicity information.

No MeSH data available.


Pitch matching accuracy and mean familiarity ratings of the three musician groups for the 2- and 3-pitch chords described in Table 2.
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brainsci-03-01615-f002: Pitch matching accuracy and mean familiarity ratings of the three musician groups for the 2- and 3-pitch chords described in Table 2.

Mentions: Figure 2 shows that the pitch matching accuracy of all three musician groups was strongly related to their mean familiarity ratings for the chords, and in confirmation of Hypothesis 1a Pearson correlations of mean familiarity and pitch matching accuracy were all similarly strong, RP (R = 0.87, p < 0.01), QAP (R = 0.86, p < 0.01) and AP (R = 0.93, p < 0.01). In support of Hypothesis 1b, the mixed between and within groups ANOVA revealed a significant main effect for chord familiarity, [F(1, 30) = 150.23, p < 0.001, partial η2 = 0.83] in which the mean pitch matching accuracy for high familiarity chords (mean = 71.2, SD = 24.9) was greater than for low familiarity chords (mean = 48.9, SD = 24.7), but there was no main effect for musician group or interaction between chord familiarity and musician group (both p > 0.05).


Pitch and plasticity: insights from the pitch matching of chords by musicians with absolute and relative pitch.

McLachlan NM, Marco DJ, Wilson SJ - Brain Sci (2013)

Pitch matching accuracy and mean familiarity ratings of the three musician groups for the 2- and 3-pitch chords described in Table 2.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4061894&req=5

brainsci-03-01615-f002: Pitch matching accuracy and mean familiarity ratings of the three musician groups for the 2- and 3-pitch chords described in Table 2.
Mentions: Figure 2 shows that the pitch matching accuracy of all three musician groups was strongly related to their mean familiarity ratings for the chords, and in confirmation of Hypothesis 1a Pearson correlations of mean familiarity and pitch matching accuracy were all similarly strong, RP (R = 0.87, p < 0.01), QAP (R = 0.86, p < 0.01) and AP (R = 0.93, p < 0.01). In support of Hypothesis 1b, the mixed between and within groups ANOVA revealed a significant main effect for chord familiarity, [F(1, 30) = 150.23, p < 0.001, partial η2 = 0.83] in which the mean pitch matching accuracy for high familiarity chords (mean = 71.2, SD = 24.9) was greater than for low familiarity chords (mean = 48.9, SD = 24.7), but there was no main effect for musician group or interaction between chord familiarity and musician group (both p > 0.05).

Bottom Line: Absolute pitch (AP) is a form of sound recognition in which musical note names are associated with discrete musical pitch categories.The dual mechanism model of pitch perception previously proposed by the authors suggests that spectral processing associated with sound recognition primes waveform processing to extract stimulus periodicity and refine pitch perception.The findings presented in this paper are consistent with the dual mechanism model of pitch, and in the case of AP musicians, the formation of nominal pitch categories based on both spectral and periodicity information.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010, Australia. mcln@unimelb.edu.au.

ABSTRACT
Absolute pitch (AP) is a form of sound recognition in which musical note names are associated with discrete musical pitch categories. The accuracy of pitch matching by non-AP musicians for chords has recently been shown to depend on stimulus familiarity, pointing to a role of spectral recognition mechanisms in the early stages of pitch processing. Here we show that pitch matching accuracy by AP musicians was also dependent on their familiarity with the chord stimulus. This suggests that the pitch matching abilities of both AP and non-AP musicians for concurrently presented pitches are dependent on initial recognition of the chord. The dual mechanism model of pitch perception previously proposed by the authors suggests that spectral processing associated with sound recognition primes waveform processing to extract stimulus periodicity and refine pitch perception. The findings presented in this paper are consistent with the dual mechanism model of pitch, and in the case of AP musicians, the formation of nominal pitch categories based on both spectral and periodicity information.

No MeSH data available.