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Pitch and plasticity: insights from the pitch matching of chords by musicians with absolute and relative pitch.

McLachlan NM, Marco DJ, Wilson SJ - Brain Sci (2013)

Bottom Line: Absolute pitch (AP) is a form of sound recognition in which musical note names are associated with discrete musical pitch categories.The dual mechanism model of pitch perception previously proposed by the authors suggests that spectral processing associated with sound recognition primes waveform processing to extract stimulus periodicity and refine pitch perception.The findings presented in this paper are consistent with the dual mechanism model of pitch, and in the case of AP musicians, the formation of nominal pitch categories based on both spectral and periodicity information.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010, Australia. mcln@unimelb.edu.au.

ABSTRACT
Absolute pitch (AP) is a form of sound recognition in which musical note names are associated with discrete musical pitch categories. The accuracy of pitch matching by non-AP musicians for chords has recently been shown to depend on stimulus familiarity, pointing to a role of spectral recognition mechanisms in the early stages of pitch processing. Here we show that pitch matching accuracy by AP musicians was also dependent on their familiarity with the chord stimulus. This suggests that the pitch matching abilities of both AP and non-AP musicians for concurrently presented pitches are dependent on initial recognition of the chord. The dual mechanism model of pitch perception previously proposed by the authors suggests that spectral processing associated with sound recognition primes waveform processing to extract stimulus periodicity and refine pitch perception. The findings presented in this paper are consistent with the dual mechanism model of pitch, and in the case of AP musicians, the formation of nominal pitch categories based on both spectral and periodicity information.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A schematic representation of the presentation of auditory stimuli. Each target stimulus and probe were synthesised with 30 ms linear onset and offset ramps and presented in a continuous sequence (shaded box) until participants matched the pitch of the probe to the target. Probes were synthesised in real-time at frequencies governed by participant movement of the computer mouse. Axis not shown to scale.
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brainsci-03-01615-f001: A schematic representation of the presentation of auditory stimuli. Each target stimulus and probe were synthesised with 30 ms linear onset and offset ramps and presented in a continuous sequence (shaded box) until participants matched the pitch of the probe to the target. Probes were synthesised in real-time at frequencies governed by participant movement of the computer mouse. Axis not shown to scale.

Mentions: The pitch matching task was adapted from Moore and Glasberg [44]. Before the presentation of each chord, participants were informed of the number of pitches (one, two or three) and the target pitch they were required to match (lowest, middle or highest). Target stimuli were followed by a set of three pure tone probes, as shown in Figure 1. Bidirectional lateral movement of a computer mouse by the participant instantly altered the pitch of the probe tones (right movement increased pitch). The target stimulus and probe tones were repeated until participants clicked the mouse to indicate when they thought the probe tone matched the target, and the cycle was terminated. Purpose-built computer software was used to present the stimuli and record task responses. The software distributed 800 screen pixels evenly between 200 and 500 Hz, providing a frequency resolution of 0.375 Hz per pixel. Pitch matching of all component pitches in each chord was pseudo-randomly ordered so that consecutive presentations of the same chord were avoided.


Pitch and plasticity: insights from the pitch matching of chords by musicians with absolute and relative pitch.

McLachlan NM, Marco DJ, Wilson SJ - Brain Sci (2013)

A schematic representation of the presentation of auditory stimuli. Each target stimulus and probe were synthesised with 30 ms linear onset and offset ramps and presented in a continuous sequence (shaded box) until participants matched the pitch of the probe to the target. Probes were synthesised in real-time at frequencies governed by participant movement of the computer mouse. Axis not shown to scale.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4061894&req=5

brainsci-03-01615-f001: A schematic representation of the presentation of auditory stimuli. Each target stimulus and probe were synthesised with 30 ms linear onset and offset ramps and presented in a continuous sequence (shaded box) until participants matched the pitch of the probe to the target. Probes were synthesised in real-time at frequencies governed by participant movement of the computer mouse. Axis not shown to scale.
Mentions: The pitch matching task was adapted from Moore and Glasberg [44]. Before the presentation of each chord, participants were informed of the number of pitches (one, two or three) and the target pitch they were required to match (lowest, middle or highest). Target stimuli were followed by a set of three pure tone probes, as shown in Figure 1. Bidirectional lateral movement of a computer mouse by the participant instantly altered the pitch of the probe tones (right movement increased pitch). The target stimulus and probe tones were repeated until participants clicked the mouse to indicate when they thought the probe tone matched the target, and the cycle was terminated. Purpose-built computer software was used to present the stimuli and record task responses. The software distributed 800 screen pixels evenly between 200 and 500 Hz, providing a frequency resolution of 0.375 Hz per pixel. Pitch matching of all component pitches in each chord was pseudo-randomly ordered so that consecutive presentations of the same chord were avoided.

Bottom Line: Absolute pitch (AP) is a form of sound recognition in which musical note names are associated with discrete musical pitch categories.The dual mechanism model of pitch perception previously proposed by the authors suggests that spectral processing associated with sound recognition primes waveform processing to extract stimulus periodicity and refine pitch perception.The findings presented in this paper are consistent with the dual mechanism model of pitch, and in the case of AP musicians, the formation of nominal pitch categories based on both spectral and periodicity information.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010, Australia. mcln@unimelb.edu.au.

ABSTRACT
Absolute pitch (AP) is a form of sound recognition in which musical note names are associated with discrete musical pitch categories. The accuracy of pitch matching by non-AP musicians for chords has recently been shown to depend on stimulus familiarity, pointing to a role of spectral recognition mechanisms in the early stages of pitch processing. Here we show that pitch matching accuracy by AP musicians was also dependent on their familiarity with the chord stimulus. This suggests that the pitch matching abilities of both AP and non-AP musicians for concurrently presented pitches are dependent on initial recognition of the chord. The dual mechanism model of pitch perception previously proposed by the authors suggests that spectral processing associated with sound recognition primes waveform processing to extract stimulus periodicity and refine pitch perception. The findings presented in this paper are consistent with the dual mechanism model of pitch, and in the case of AP musicians, the formation of nominal pitch categories based on both spectral and periodicity information.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus