Limits...
Neural correlates of processing passive sentences.

Mack JE, Meltzer-Asscher A, Barbieri E, Thompson CK - Brain Sci (2013)

Bottom Line: Passive sentences, relative to active sentences, elicited greater activation in bilateral IFG and left temporo-occipital regions.Participant age did not significantly affect patterns of activation.Right IFG activation may reflect syntactic reanalysis processing demands associated with the sentence-picture verification task.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Center for the Neurobiology of Language, Northwestern University, Francis Searle Building, 2240 Campus Drive, Evanston, IL 60208, USA. jennifer-mack-0@northwestern.edu.

ABSTRACT
Previous research has shown that comprehension of complex sentences involving wh-movement (e.g., object-relative clauses) elicits activation in the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and left posterior temporal cortex. However, relatively little is known about the neural correlates of processing passive sentences, which differ from other complex sentences in terms of representation (i.e., noun phrase (NP)-movement) and processing (i.e., the time course of syntactic reanalysis). In the present study, 27 adults (14 younger and 13 older) listened to passive and active sentences and performed a sentence-picture verification task using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). Passive sentences, relative to active sentences, elicited greater activation in bilateral IFG and left temporo-occipital regions. Participant age did not significantly affect patterns of activation. Consistent with previous research, activation in left temporo-occipital cortex likely reflects thematic reanalysis processes, whereas, activation in the left IFG supports processing of complex syntax (i.e., NP-movement). Right IFG activation may reflect syntactic reanalysis processing demands associated with the sentence-picture verification task.

No MeSH data available.


Regions of differential activation for passive as compared to active sentences (voxel-wise threshold of p < 0.001; k ≥ 85).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4061884&req=5

brainsci-03-01198-f001: Regions of differential activation for passive as compared to active sentences (voxel-wise threshold of p < 0.001; k ≥ 85).

Mentions: Passive sentences, as compared to active sentences, elicited significant clusters of activation in the bilateral inferior frontal gyrus (pars opercularis and pars triangularis, overlapping with BA’s 44 and 45), as well as in the left temporo-occipital junction (middle occipital gyrus and posterior middle temporal gyrus); see Table 1 and Figure 1. Additional clusters that did not survive correction for multiple comparisons were observed in the bilateral supplementary motor area, the left superior parietal lobule, and the left precentral gyrus. The reverse contrast, of active over passive sentences, did not reveal any significant areas of activation. In addition, no significant effects of age were observed for either contrast (passive > active, active > passive).


Neural correlates of processing passive sentences.

Mack JE, Meltzer-Asscher A, Barbieri E, Thompson CK - Brain Sci (2013)

Regions of differential activation for passive as compared to active sentences (voxel-wise threshold of p < 0.001; k ≥ 85).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4061884&req=5

brainsci-03-01198-f001: Regions of differential activation for passive as compared to active sentences (voxel-wise threshold of p < 0.001; k ≥ 85).
Mentions: Passive sentences, as compared to active sentences, elicited significant clusters of activation in the bilateral inferior frontal gyrus (pars opercularis and pars triangularis, overlapping with BA’s 44 and 45), as well as in the left temporo-occipital junction (middle occipital gyrus and posterior middle temporal gyrus); see Table 1 and Figure 1. Additional clusters that did not survive correction for multiple comparisons were observed in the bilateral supplementary motor area, the left superior parietal lobule, and the left precentral gyrus. The reverse contrast, of active over passive sentences, did not reveal any significant areas of activation. In addition, no significant effects of age were observed for either contrast (passive > active, active > passive).

Bottom Line: Passive sentences, relative to active sentences, elicited greater activation in bilateral IFG and left temporo-occipital regions.Participant age did not significantly affect patterns of activation.Right IFG activation may reflect syntactic reanalysis processing demands associated with the sentence-picture verification task.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Center for the Neurobiology of Language, Northwestern University, Francis Searle Building, 2240 Campus Drive, Evanston, IL 60208, USA. jennifer-mack-0@northwestern.edu.

ABSTRACT
Previous research has shown that comprehension of complex sentences involving wh-movement (e.g., object-relative clauses) elicits activation in the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and left posterior temporal cortex. However, relatively little is known about the neural correlates of processing passive sentences, which differ from other complex sentences in terms of representation (i.e., noun phrase (NP)-movement) and processing (i.e., the time course of syntactic reanalysis). In the present study, 27 adults (14 younger and 13 older) listened to passive and active sentences and performed a sentence-picture verification task using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). Passive sentences, relative to active sentences, elicited greater activation in bilateral IFG and left temporo-occipital regions. Participant age did not significantly affect patterns of activation. Consistent with previous research, activation in left temporo-occipital cortex likely reflects thematic reanalysis processes, whereas, activation in the left IFG supports processing of complex syntax (i.e., NP-movement). Right IFG activation may reflect syntactic reanalysis processing demands associated with the sentence-picture verification task.

No MeSH data available.