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Changes in oscillatory brain networks after lexical tone training.

Kaan E, Wayland R, Keil A - Brain Sci (2013)

Bottom Line: We compared native speakers of English (a non-tone language) and native speakers of Mandarin Chinese (a tone language), before and after a two-day laboratory training.Native English speakers showed a larger gamma-band power and stronger alpha-band synchrony across EEG channels than the native Chinese speakers, especially after training.This is compatible with the view that forming new speech categories on the basis of unfamiliar perceptual dimensions involves stronger gamma activity and more coherent activity in alpha-band networks than forming new categories on the basis of familiar dimensions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Linguistics, University of Florida, P.O. Box 115454, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA. kaan@ufl.edu.

ABSTRACT
Learning foreign speech contrasts involves creating new representations of sound categories in memory. This formation of new memory representations is likely to involve changes in neural networks as reflected by oscillatory brain activity. To explore this, we conducted time-frequency analyses of electro-encephalography (EEG) data recorded in a passive auditory oddball paradigm using Thai language tones. We compared native speakers of English (a non-tone language) and native speakers of Mandarin Chinese (a tone language), before and after a two-day laboratory training. Native English speakers showed a larger gamma-band power and stronger alpha-band synchrony across EEG channels than the native Chinese speakers, especially after training. This is compatible with the view that forming new speech categories on the basis of unfamiliar perceptual dimensions involves stronger gamma activity and more coherent activity in alpha-band networks than forming new categories on the basis of familiar dimensions.

No MeSH data available.


Means over all lateral electrodes for the three language groups before training, collapsed over tone. (A) gamma-band power, 200–400 ms after stimulus onset; (B) alpha-band power, 100–500 ms after stimulus onset; (C) gamma-band phase synchrony (PLS) with FCz, 200–400 ms after stimulus onset; (D) alpha-band phase synchrony (PLS) with Cz, 100–500 ms after stimulus onset. Note that the y-axis starts at 0.1, and that different scales are used for the different subfigures. The error bars represent the Standard Error.
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brainsci-03-00757-f001: Means over all lateral electrodes for the three language groups before training, collapsed over tone. (A) gamma-band power, 200–400 ms after stimulus onset; (B) alpha-band power, 100–500 ms after stimulus onset; (C) gamma-band phase synchrony (PLS) with FCz, 200–400 ms after stimulus onset; (D) alpha-band phase synchrony (PLS) with Cz, 100–500 ms after stimulus onset. Note that the y-axis starts at 0.1, and that different scales are used for the different subfigures. The error bars represent the Standard Error.

Mentions: Our first question concerned whether the native English, Chinese and Thai groups differed in the processing of the Thai tone stimuli before training, as reflected by differences in gamma-band power, alpha-band power, gamma-band phase synchrony and alpha-band phase synchrony. Figure 1 gives an overview of the differences between the three language groups before training.


Changes in oscillatory brain networks after lexical tone training.

Kaan E, Wayland R, Keil A - Brain Sci (2013)

Means over all lateral electrodes for the three language groups before training, collapsed over tone. (A) gamma-band power, 200–400 ms after stimulus onset; (B) alpha-band power, 100–500 ms after stimulus onset; (C) gamma-band phase synchrony (PLS) with FCz, 200–400 ms after stimulus onset; (D) alpha-band phase synchrony (PLS) with Cz, 100–500 ms after stimulus onset. Note that the y-axis starts at 0.1, and that different scales are used for the different subfigures. The error bars represent the Standard Error.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4061855&req=5

brainsci-03-00757-f001: Means over all lateral electrodes for the three language groups before training, collapsed over tone. (A) gamma-band power, 200–400 ms after stimulus onset; (B) alpha-band power, 100–500 ms after stimulus onset; (C) gamma-band phase synchrony (PLS) with FCz, 200–400 ms after stimulus onset; (D) alpha-band phase synchrony (PLS) with Cz, 100–500 ms after stimulus onset. Note that the y-axis starts at 0.1, and that different scales are used for the different subfigures. The error bars represent the Standard Error.
Mentions: Our first question concerned whether the native English, Chinese and Thai groups differed in the processing of the Thai tone stimuli before training, as reflected by differences in gamma-band power, alpha-band power, gamma-band phase synchrony and alpha-band phase synchrony. Figure 1 gives an overview of the differences between the three language groups before training.

Bottom Line: We compared native speakers of English (a non-tone language) and native speakers of Mandarin Chinese (a tone language), before and after a two-day laboratory training.Native English speakers showed a larger gamma-band power and stronger alpha-band synchrony across EEG channels than the native Chinese speakers, especially after training.This is compatible with the view that forming new speech categories on the basis of unfamiliar perceptual dimensions involves stronger gamma activity and more coherent activity in alpha-band networks than forming new categories on the basis of familiar dimensions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Linguistics, University of Florida, P.O. Box 115454, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA. kaan@ufl.edu.

ABSTRACT
Learning foreign speech contrasts involves creating new representations of sound categories in memory. This formation of new memory representations is likely to involve changes in neural networks as reflected by oscillatory brain activity. To explore this, we conducted time-frequency analyses of electro-encephalography (EEG) data recorded in a passive auditory oddball paradigm using Thai language tones. We compared native speakers of English (a non-tone language) and native speakers of Mandarin Chinese (a tone language), before and after a two-day laboratory training. Native English speakers showed a larger gamma-band power and stronger alpha-band synchrony across EEG channels than the native Chinese speakers, especially after training. This is compatible with the view that forming new speech categories on the basis of unfamiliar perceptual dimensions involves stronger gamma activity and more coherent activity in alpha-band networks than forming new categories on the basis of familiar dimensions.

No MeSH data available.