Limits...
Physical activity, cognitive function, and brain health: what is the role of exercise training in the prevention of dementia?

Gregory SM, Parker B, Thompson PD - Brain Sci (2012)

Bottom Line: We will review pertinent animal and human research examining the effects of physical activity on cognitive function and neurophysiology.We will discuss cross-sectional and longitudinal studies addressing the relationship between neurocognitive health and cardiorespiratory fitness or habitual activity level.We will conclude by summarizing our current understanding of the relationship between physical activity and brain health, and present areas for future research given the current gaps in our understanding of this issue.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Preventive Cardiology, Hartford Hospital, 80 Seymour Street, Hartford, CT 06102, USA. sgregory@harthosp.org.

ABSTRACT
Tor preventive measures are necessary to attenuate the increased economic and social burden of dementia. This review will focus on the potential for physical activity and exercise training to promote brain health and improve cognitive function via neurophysiological changes. We will review pertinent animal and human research examining the effects of physical activity on cognitive function and neurophysiology. We will discuss cross-sectional and longitudinal studies addressing the relationship between neurocognitive health and cardiorespiratory fitness or habitual activity level. We will then present and discuss longitudinal investigations examining the effects of exercise training on cognitive function and neurophysiology. We will conclude by summarizing our current understanding of the relationship between physical activity and brain health, and present areas for future research given the current gaps in our understanding of this issue.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Prevalence (2010) and projected population estimates in 2030 and 2050 for the number of US adults over age 65, with Alzheimer’s dementia, and with cognitive impairment based on US Census Bureau population projections.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4061820&req=5

brainsci-02-00684-f001: Prevalence (2010) and projected population estimates in 2030 and 2050 for the number of US adults over age 65, with Alzheimer’s dementia, and with cognitive impairment based on US Census Bureau population projections.

Mentions: The elderly population in the United States is expected to increase dramatically by mid-century. US Census Bureau projections estimate that the population of US residents over age 65 will more than double between 2008 and 2050, and 1 in 5 US residents will be over the age of 65 by 2030 [1,2] (Figure 1). A progressively older population increases the social and economic burdens required to care for the physiological consequences of the aging process, including the structural and functional changes in the brain associated with a decline in cognitive function [3]. Age-related cognitive changes may progress from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to dementia—a condition in which memory, behavior, and cognition are impaired secondary to neurodegeneration in the brain. Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is diagnosed when these neurodegenerative brain changes prevent an individual from performing basic physical tasks and bodily functions [4]. It is estimated that 5.4 million people suffer from AD in 2012 (5.2 million over the age of 65) and healthcare costs related to AD are estimated at between $130 and $200 billion in the US [4,5]. These costs are projected to reach $1.1 trillion by 2050. As the elderly population grows, the healthcare-related financial burden will increase, and the need for pharmacological and non-pharmacological prevention and treatment for these conditions increases. This review of literature will discuss the potential for regular physical activity to maintain cognitive function and normal neurophysiology, and prevent the progression from mild cognitive impairment to dementia.


Physical activity, cognitive function, and brain health: what is the role of exercise training in the prevention of dementia?

Gregory SM, Parker B, Thompson PD - Brain Sci (2012)

Prevalence (2010) and projected population estimates in 2030 and 2050 for the number of US adults over age 65, with Alzheimer’s dementia, and with cognitive impairment based on US Census Bureau population projections.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4061820&req=5

brainsci-02-00684-f001: Prevalence (2010) and projected population estimates in 2030 and 2050 for the number of US adults over age 65, with Alzheimer’s dementia, and with cognitive impairment based on US Census Bureau population projections.
Mentions: The elderly population in the United States is expected to increase dramatically by mid-century. US Census Bureau projections estimate that the population of US residents over age 65 will more than double between 2008 and 2050, and 1 in 5 US residents will be over the age of 65 by 2030 [1,2] (Figure 1). A progressively older population increases the social and economic burdens required to care for the physiological consequences of the aging process, including the structural and functional changes in the brain associated with a decline in cognitive function [3]. Age-related cognitive changes may progress from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to dementia—a condition in which memory, behavior, and cognition are impaired secondary to neurodegeneration in the brain. Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is diagnosed when these neurodegenerative brain changes prevent an individual from performing basic physical tasks and bodily functions [4]. It is estimated that 5.4 million people suffer from AD in 2012 (5.2 million over the age of 65) and healthcare costs related to AD are estimated at between $130 and $200 billion in the US [4,5]. These costs are projected to reach $1.1 trillion by 2050. As the elderly population grows, the healthcare-related financial burden will increase, and the need for pharmacological and non-pharmacological prevention and treatment for these conditions increases. This review of literature will discuss the potential for regular physical activity to maintain cognitive function and normal neurophysiology, and prevent the progression from mild cognitive impairment to dementia.

Bottom Line: We will review pertinent animal and human research examining the effects of physical activity on cognitive function and neurophysiology.We will discuss cross-sectional and longitudinal studies addressing the relationship between neurocognitive health and cardiorespiratory fitness or habitual activity level.We will conclude by summarizing our current understanding of the relationship between physical activity and brain health, and present areas for future research given the current gaps in our understanding of this issue.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Preventive Cardiology, Hartford Hospital, 80 Seymour Street, Hartford, CT 06102, USA. sgregory@harthosp.org.

ABSTRACT
Tor preventive measures are necessary to attenuate the increased economic and social burden of dementia. This review will focus on the potential for physical activity and exercise training to promote brain health and improve cognitive function via neurophysiological changes. We will review pertinent animal and human research examining the effects of physical activity on cognitive function and neurophysiology. We will discuss cross-sectional and longitudinal studies addressing the relationship between neurocognitive health and cardiorespiratory fitness or habitual activity level. We will then present and discuss longitudinal investigations examining the effects of exercise training on cognitive function and neurophysiology. We will conclude by summarizing our current understanding of the relationship between physical activity and brain health, and present areas for future research given the current gaps in our understanding of this issue.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus