Limits...
The "id" knows more than the "ego" admits: neuropsychoanalytic and primal consciousness perspectives on the interface between affective and cognitive neuroscience.

Solms M, Panksepp J - Brain Sci (2012)

Bottom Line: These subcortical energies provided a foundation that could be used for the epigenetic construction of perceptual and other higher forms of consciousness.Within this view, although all individual neural activities are unconscious, perhaps along with secondary-process learning and memory mechanisms, the primal sub-neocortical networks of emotions and other primal affects may have served as the sentient scaffolding for the construction of resolved perceptual and higher mental activities within the neocortex.The data supporting this neuro-psycho-evolutionary vision of the emergence of mind is discussed in relation to classical psychoanalytical models.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Cape Town, Cape Town 7701, South Africa. Mark.Solms@uct.ac.za.

ABSTRACT
It is commonly believed that consciousness is a higher brain function. Here we consider the likelihood, based on abundant neuroevolutionary data that lower brain affective phenomenal experiences provide the "energy" for the developmental construction of higher forms of cognitive consciousness. This view is concordant with many of the theoretical formulations of Sigmund Freud. In this reconceptualization, all of consciousness may be dependent on the original evolution of affective phenomenal experiences that coded survival values. These subcortical energies provided a foundation that could be used for the epigenetic construction of perceptual and other higher forms of consciousness. From this perspective, perceptual experiences were initially affective at the primary-process brainstem level, but capable of being elaborated by secondary learning and memory processes into tertiary-cognitive forms of consciousness. Within this view, although all individual neural activities are unconscious, perhaps along with secondary-process learning and memory mechanisms, the primal sub-neocortical networks of emotions and other primal affects may have served as the sentient scaffolding for the construction of resolved perceptual and higher mental activities within the neocortex. The data supporting this neuro-psycho-evolutionary vision of the emergence of mind is discussed in relation to classical psychoanalytical models.

No MeSH data available.


Freud’s final model of the mental apparatus. Pcpt.-Cs. = Perceptual-Consciousness system. Reproduced from [17] with permission.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4061793&req=5

brainsci-02-00147-f003: Freud’s final model of the mental apparatus. Pcpt.-Cs. = Perceptual-Consciousness system. Reproduced from [17] with permission.

Mentions: This revision was retained in Freud’s final model [17]. The major purpose of his last revision was to recognize the fact that executive control did not coincide with any grade of consciousness (or preconsciousness). For example automatized “descriptively” unconscious processes, which never became conscious, were under inhibitory control (they were secondary processes; cf. [5,15]) and served the functional purposes of the reality principle. Likewise, the process of repression, despite being “dynamically” unconscious, served inhibitory purposes. Freud thus grouped all the inhibited grades of both conscious and unconscious processes under a single executive system—the “ego”—the distinguishing feature of which was its utilization of “bound” energies (which underpinned all “cognitive” processes); and he likewise grouped all the uninhibited (“instinctual” affective) processes under a single system utilizing “free” drive energy—the “id” (see Figure 3).


The "id" knows more than the "ego" admits: neuropsychoanalytic and primal consciousness perspectives on the interface between affective and cognitive neuroscience.

Solms M, Panksepp J - Brain Sci (2012)

Freud’s final model of the mental apparatus. Pcpt.-Cs. = Perceptual-Consciousness system. Reproduced from [17] with permission.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4061793&req=5

brainsci-02-00147-f003: Freud’s final model of the mental apparatus. Pcpt.-Cs. = Perceptual-Consciousness system. Reproduced from [17] with permission.
Mentions: This revision was retained in Freud’s final model [17]. The major purpose of his last revision was to recognize the fact that executive control did not coincide with any grade of consciousness (or preconsciousness). For example automatized “descriptively” unconscious processes, which never became conscious, were under inhibitory control (they were secondary processes; cf. [5,15]) and served the functional purposes of the reality principle. Likewise, the process of repression, despite being “dynamically” unconscious, served inhibitory purposes. Freud thus grouped all the inhibited grades of both conscious and unconscious processes under a single executive system—the “ego”—the distinguishing feature of which was its utilization of “bound” energies (which underpinned all “cognitive” processes); and he likewise grouped all the uninhibited (“instinctual” affective) processes under a single system utilizing “free” drive energy—the “id” (see Figure 3).

Bottom Line: These subcortical energies provided a foundation that could be used for the epigenetic construction of perceptual and other higher forms of consciousness.Within this view, although all individual neural activities are unconscious, perhaps along with secondary-process learning and memory mechanisms, the primal sub-neocortical networks of emotions and other primal affects may have served as the sentient scaffolding for the construction of resolved perceptual and higher mental activities within the neocortex.The data supporting this neuro-psycho-evolutionary vision of the emergence of mind is discussed in relation to classical psychoanalytical models.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Cape Town, Cape Town 7701, South Africa. Mark.Solms@uct.ac.za.

ABSTRACT
It is commonly believed that consciousness is a higher brain function. Here we consider the likelihood, based on abundant neuroevolutionary data that lower brain affective phenomenal experiences provide the "energy" for the developmental construction of higher forms of cognitive consciousness. This view is concordant with many of the theoretical formulations of Sigmund Freud. In this reconceptualization, all of consciousness may be dependent on the original evolution of affective phenomenal experiences that coded survival values. These subcortical energies provided a foundation that could be used for the epigenetic construction of perceptual and other higher forms of consciousness. From this perspective, perceptual experiences were initially affective at the primary-process brainstem level, but capable of being elaborated by secondary learning and memory processes into tertiary-cognitive forms of consciousness. Within this view, although all individual neural activities are unconscious, perhaps along with secondary-process learning and memory mechanisms, the primal sub-neocortical networks of emotions and other primal affects may have served as the sentient scaffolding for the construction of resolved perceptual and higher mental activities within the neocortex. The data supporting this neuro-psycho-evolutionary vision of the emergence of mind is discussed in relation to classical psychoanalytical models.

No MeSH data available.