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A high-fat meal, or intraperitoneal administration of a fat emulsion, increases extracellular dopamine in the nucleus accumbens.

Rada P, Avena NM, Barson JR, Hoebel BG, Leibowitz SF - Brain Sci (2012)

Bottom Line: Evidence links dopamine (DA) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell to the ingestion of palatable diets.The present experiments tested in Sprague-Dawley rats whether extracellular levels of NAc DA increase in response to acute access to fat-rich food or peripheral injection of a fat emulsion and, if so, whether this is related to caloric intake or elevated circulating lipids.When rats consumed more calories of a high-fat meal compared with a low-fat meal, there was a significant increase in extracellular accumbens DA (155% vs. 119%).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Behavioral Physiology, School of Medicine, University of Los Andes, Mérida 5101-A, Venezuela. radap@ula.ve.

ABSTRACT
Evidence links dopamine (DA) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell to the ingestion of palatable diets. Less is known, however, about the specific relation of DA to dietary fat and circulating triglycerides (TG), which are stimulated by fat intake and promote overeating. The present experiments tested in Sprague-Dawley rats whether extracellular levels of NAc DA increase in response to acute access to fat-rich food or peripheral injection of a fat emulsion and, if so, whether this is related to caloric intake or elevated circulating lipids. When rats consumed more calories of a high-fat meal compared with a low-fat meal, there was a significant increase in extracellular accumbens DA (155% vs. 119%). Systemic injection of a fat emulsion, which like a high-fat diet raises circulating TG but eliminates the factor of taste and allows for the control of caloric intake, also significantly increased extracellular levels of DA (127%) compared to an equicaloric glucose solution (70%) and saline (85%). Together, this suggests that a rise in circulating TG may contribute to the stimulatory effect of a high-fat diet on NAc DA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Consumption of a high-fat meal stimulates the release of accumbens dopamine more than consumption of a low-fat meal. While rats had the meal available for 60 min, they consumed most of it during the first 20 min of access (represented by the black bar on the ordinate). Mean ± SEM, * p < 0.05 vs. low-fat meal.
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brainsci-02-00242-f001: Consumption of a high-fat meal stimulates the release of accumbens dopamine more than consumption of a low-fat meal. While rats had the meal available for 60 min, they consumed most of it during the first 20 min of access (represented by the black bar on the ordinate). Mean ± SEM, * p < 0.05 vs. low-fat meal.

Mentions: In order to test the effects of a high-fat vs. a low-fat meal on extracellular levels of DA in the NAc, we offered Sprague-Dawley rats acute (60 min) access to these diets, and then used in vivo microdialysis to assess the levels of DA in response to eating the meal. Rats consumed more when offered the high-fat meal compared with the low-fat meal (27.8 ± 1.7 vs. 13.9 ± 1.9 kcal, p < 0.001). The high-fat meal increased extracellular levels of NAc DA significantly more than the low-fat meal (F (1, 8) = 8.31, p < 0.05), and this effect was moderated by time (F (7, 56) = 2.95, p < 0.05; see Figure 1). Consumption of the high-fat meal also elevated DA release compared to baseline (F (7, 56) = 6.28, p < 0.001), with levels peaking to 155% of baseline at 20 min after meal presentation (p < 0.01; see Figure 1). This is in contrast to the low-fat meal, which compared to baseline did not significantly stimulate extracellular DA levels.


A high-fat meal, or intraperitoneal administration of a fat emulsion, increases extracellular dopamine in the nucleus accumbens.

Rada P, Avena NM, Barson JR, Hoebel BG, Leibowitz SF - Brain Sci (2012)

Consumption of a high-fat meal stimulates the release of accumbens dopamine more than consumption of a low-fat meal. While rats had the meal available for 60 min, they consumed most of it during the first 20 min of access (represented by the black bar on the ordinate). Mean ± SEM, * p < 0.05 vs. low-fat meal.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4061790&req=5

brainsci-02-00242-f001: Consumption of a high-fat meal stimulates the release of accumbens dopamine more than consumption of a low-fat meal. While rats had the meal available for 60 min, they consumed most of it during the first 20 min of access (represented by the black bar on the ordinate). Mean ± SEM, * p < 0.05 vs. low-fat meal.
Mentions: In order to test the effects of a high-fat vs. a low-fat meal on extracellular levels of DA in the NAc, we offered Sprague-Dawley rats acute (60 min) access to these diets, and then used in vivo microdialysis to assess the levels of DA in response to eating the meal. Rats consumed more when offered the high-fat meal compared with the low-fat meal (27.8 ± 1.7 vs. 13.9 ± 1.9 kcal, p < 0.001). The high-fat meal increased extracellular levels of NAc DA significantly more than the low-fat meal (F (1, 8) = 8.31, p < 0.05), and this effect was moderated by time (F (7, 56) = 2.95, p < 0.05; see Figure 1). Consumption of the high-fat meal also elevated DA release compared to baseline (F (7, 56) = 6.28, p < 0.001), with levels peaking to 155% of baseline at 20 min after meal presentation (p < 0.01; see Figure 1). This is in contrast to the low-fat meal, which compared to baseline did not significantly stimulate extracellular DA levels.

Bottom Line: Evidence links dopamine (DA) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell to the ingestion of palatable diets.The present experiments tested in Sprague-Dawley rats whether extracellular levels of NAc DA increase in response to acute access to fat-rich food or peripheral injection of a fat emulsion and, if so, whether this is related to caloric intake or elevated circulating lipids.When rats consumed more calories of a high-fat meal compared with a low-fat meal, there was a significant increase in extracellular accumbens DA (155% vs. 119%).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Behavioral Physiology, School of Medicine, University of Los Andes, Mérida 5101-A, Venezuela. radap@ula.ve.

ABSTRACT
Evidence links dopamine (DA) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell to the ingestion of palatable diets. Less is known, however, about the specific relation of DA to dietary fat and circulating triglycerides (TG), which are stimulated by fat intake and promote overeating. The present experiments tested in Sprague-Dawley rats whether extracellular levels of NAc DA increase in response to acute access to fat-rich food or peripheral injection of a fat emulsion and, if so, whether this is related to caloric intake or elevated circulating lipids. When rats consumed more calories of a high-fat meal compared with a low-fat meal, there was a significant increase in extracellular accumbens DA (155% vs. 119%). Systemic injection of a fat emulsion, which like a high-fat diet raises circulating TG but eliminates the factor of taste and allows for the control of caloric intake, also significantly increased extracellular levels of DA (127%) compared to an equicaloric glucose solution (70%) and saline (85%). Together, this suggests that a rise in circulating TG may contribute to the stimulatory effect of a high-fat diet on NAc DA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus