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Unconscious Cueing via the Superior Colliculi: Evidence from Searching for Onset and Color Targets.

Fuchs I, Ansorge U - Brain Sci (2012)

Bottom Line: When using color change cues instead of abrupt-onset cues, the cueing effect also vanishes (Experiment 6).Together the results support the assumption that unconscious cues can capture attention in different ways, depending on the exact task of the participants, but that one way is attentional capture via the SC.The present findings also offer a reconciliation of conflicting results in the domain of unconscious attention.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Psychology, University of Vienna, Liebiggasse 5, 1010 Vienna, Austria. isabella.fuchs@univie.ac.at.

ABSTRACT
According to the bottom-up theory of attention, unconscious abrupt onsets are highly salient and capture attention via the Superior Colliculi (SC). Crucially, abrupt onsets increase the perceived contrast. In line with the SC hypothesis, unconscious abrupt-onset cues capture attention regardless of the cue color when participants search for abrupt-onset targets (Experiment 1). Also, stronger cueing effects occur for higher than lower contrast cues (Experiment 2) and for temporally, rather than nasally, presented stimuli (Experiment 3). However, in line with the known color-insensitivity of the SC, the SC pathway is shunted and unconscious abrupt-onset cues no longer capture attention when the participants have to search for color-defined targets (Experiment 4) or color-singleton targets (Experiment 5). When using color change cues instead of abrupt-onset cues, the cueing effect also vanishes (Experiment 6). Together the results support the assumption that unconscious cues can capture attention in different ways, depending on the exact task of the participants, but that one way is attentional capture via the SC. The present findings also offer a reconciliation of conflicting results in the domain of unconscious attention.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Individual scatter plots of the short SOA for Experiment 6. Shown are RT differences (cueing effects, y-axis) and the respective d’-value (x-axis) for each participant separately. Values are plotted separately for cues with the same (triangles; solid regression line) and a different color (circles; dashed regression line). Symbols are colored corresponding to the respective searched-for target color.
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brainsci-02-00033-f013: Individual scatter plots of the short SOA for Experiment 6. Shown are RT differences (cueing effects, y-axis) and the respective d’-value (x-axis) for each participant separately. Values are plotted separately for cues with the same (triangles; solid regression line) and a different color (circles; dashed regression line). Symbols are colored corresponding to the respective searched-for target color.


Unconscious Cueing via the Superior Colliculi: Evidence from Searching for Onset and Color Targets.

Fuchs I, Ansorge U - Brain Sci (2012)

Individual scatter plots of the short SOA for Experiment 6. Shown are RT differences (cueing effects, y-axis) and the respective d’-value (x-axis) for each participant separately. Values are plotted separately for cues with the same (triangles; solid regression line) and a different color (circles; dashed regression line). Symbols are colored corresponding to the respective searched-for target color.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4061783&req=5

brainsci-02-00033-f013: Individual scatter plots of the short SOA for Experiment 6. Shown are RT differences (cueing effects, y-axis) and the respective d’-value (x-axis) for each participant separately. Values are plotted separately for cues with the same (triangles; solid regression line) and a different color (circles; dashed regression line). Symbols are colored corresponding to the respective searched-for target color.
Bottom Line: When using color change cues instead of abrupt-onset cues, the cueing effect also vanishes (Experiment 6).Together the results support the assumption that unconscious cues can capture attention in different ways, depending on the exact task of the participants, but that one way is attentional capture via the SC.The present findings also offer a reconciliation of conflicting results in the domain of unconscious attention.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Psychology, University of Vienna, Liebiggasse 5, 1010 Vienna, Austria. isabella.fuchs@univie.ac.at.

ABSTRACT
According to the bottom-up theory of attention, unconscious abrupt onsets are highly salient and capture attention via the Superior Colliculi (SC). Crucially, abrupt onsets increase the perceived contrast. In line with the SC hypothesis, unconscious abrupt-onset cues capture attention regardless of the cue color when participants search for abrupt-onset targets (Experiment 1). Also, stronger cueing effects occur for higher than lower contrast cues (Experiment 2) and for temporally, rather than nasally, presented stimuli (Experiment 3). However, in line with the known color-insensitivity of the SC, the SC pathway is shunted and unconscious abrupt-onset cues no longer capture attention when the participants have to search for color-defined targets (Experiment 4) or color-singleton targets (Experiment 5). When using color change cues instead of abrupt-onset cues, the cueing effect also vanishes (Experiment 6). Together the results support the assumption that unconscious cues can capture attention in different ways, depending on the exact task of the participants, but that one way is attentional capture via the SC. The present findings also offer a reconciliation of conflicting results in the domain of unconscious attention.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus