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Acute versus chronic supplementation of sodium citrate on 200 m performance in adolescent swimmers.

Russell C, Papadopoulos E, Mezil Y, Wells GD, Plyley MJ, Greenway M, Klentrou P - J Int Soc Sports Nutr (2014)

Bottom Line: A double-blinded, placebo-controlled, cross-over design was used to investigate whether two different sodium citrate dihydrate (Na-CIT) supplementation protocols improve 200 m swimming performance in adolescent swimmers.Performance time, rate of perceived exertion, pH, base excess, bicarbonate and lactate concentration were measured.Acute supplementation of Na-CIT prior to 200 m swimming performance led to a modest time improvement and higher blood lactate concentrations in only half of the swimmers while the chronic Na-CIT supplementation did not provide any ergogenic effect in this group of adolescent swimmers.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Kinesiology, Faculty of Applied Health Sciences, Brock University, 500 Glenridge Av., St. Catharines, Ontario L2S 3A1, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Background: A double-blinded, placebo-controlled, cross-over design was used to investigate whether two different sodium citrate dihydrate (Na-CIT) supplementation protocols improve 200 m swimming performance in adolescent swimmers.

Methods: Ten, male swimmers (14.9 ± 0.4 years of age; 63.5 ± 4 kg) performed four 200 m time trials with the following treatments: acute (ACU) supplementation (0.5 g kg(-1) administered 120 min pre-trial), acute placebo (PLC-A), chronic (CHR) supplementation (0.1 g∙kg(-1) for three days and 0.3 g kg(-1) on the forth day 120 min pre-trial), and chronic placebo (PLC-C). The order of the trials was randomized, with at least a six-day wash-out period between trials. Blood samples were collected by finger prick pre-ingestion, 100 min post-ingestion, and 3 min post-trial. Performance time, rate of perceived exertion, pH, base excess, bicarbonate and lactate concentration were measured.

Results: Post-ingestion bicarbonate and base excess were higher (P < 0.05) in both the ACU and CHR trials compared to placebo showing adequate pre-exercise alkalosis. However, performance time, rate of perceived exertion as well as post-trial pH and lactate concentration were not significantly different between trials. Further analysis revealed that five swimmers, identified as responders, improved their performance time by 1.03% (P < 0.05) and attained higher post-trial lactate concentrations in the ACU versus PLC-A trial (P < 0.05). They also had significantly higher post-trial lactate concentrations compared to the non-responders in the ACU and CHR trials.

Conclusions: Acute supplementation of Na-CIT prior to 200 m swimming performance led to a modest time improvement and higher blood lactate concentrations in only half of the swimmers while the chronic Na-CIT supplementation did not provide any ergogenic effect in this group of adolescent swimmers.

Trial registration: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01835912.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Absolute change in performance time for the responders (n = 5) and non-responders (n = 5) comparing acute (ACU) versus acute placebo (PLC-A) supplementation trials. Performance was significantly different in the ACU versus PLC-A (P < 0.05). Each line represents a different swimmer.
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Figure 1: Absolute change in performance time for the responders (n = 5) and non-responders (n = 5) comparing acute (ACU) versus acute placebo (PLC-A) supplementation trials. Performance was significantly different in the ACU versus PLC-A (P < 0.05). Each line represents a different swimmer.

Mentions: The five swimmers, identified as responders, improved their performance times by 1.03% (P < 0.05) in the ACU compared to the PLC-A trial (Figure 1). This improvement was statistically significant and more than the set minimum improvement of 0.4%. However, even after applying the 0.4% minimum improvement requirement there were no significant performance differences in the CHR compared to the PLC-C trial. In addition, no significant ergogenic or ergolytic effect was found in the non-responders. Although statistically non-significant, the five swimmers classified as responders were older and had a higher body mass and BMI than the non-responders (Table 1).


Acute versus chronic supplementation of sodium citrate on 200 m performance in adolescent swimmers.

Russell C, Papadopoulos E, Mezil Y, Wells GD, Plyley MJ, Greenway M, Klentrou P - J Int Soc Sports Nutr (2014)

Absolute change in performance time for the responders (n = 5) and non-responders (n = 5) comparing acute (ACU) versus acute placebo (PLC-A) supplementation trials. Performance was significantly different in the ACU versus PLC-A (P < 0.05). Each line represents a different swimmer.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4061773&req=5

Figure 1: Absolute change in performance time for the responders (n = 5) and non-responders (n = 5) comparing acute (ACU) versus acute placebo (PLC-A) supplementation trials. Performance was significantly different in the ACU versus PLC-A (P < 0.05). Each line represents a different swimmer.
Mentions: The five swimmers, identified as responders, improved their performance times by 1.03% (P < 0.05) in the ACU compared to the PLC-A trial (Figure 1). This improvement was statistically significant and more than the set minimum improvement of 0.4%. However, even after applying the 0.4% minimum improvement requirement there were no significant performance differences in the CHR compared to the PLC-C trial. In addition, no significant ergogenic or ergolytic effect was found in the non-responders. Although statistically non-significant, the five swimmers classified as responders were older and had a higher body mass and BMI than the non-responders (Table 1).

Bottom Line: A double-blinded, placebo-controlled, cross-over design was used to investigate whether two different sodium citrate dihydrate (Na-CIT) supplementation protocols improve 200 m swimming performance in adolescent swimmers.Performance time, rate of perceived exertion, pH, base excess, bicarbonate and lactate concentration were measured.Acute supplementation of Na-CIT prior to 200 m swimming performance led to a modest time improvement and higher blood lactate concentrations in only half of the swimmers while the chronic Na-CIT supplementation did not provide any ergogenic effect in this group of adolescent swimmers.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Kinesiology, Faculty of Applied Health Sciences, Brock University, 500 Glenridge Av., St. Catharines, Ontario L2S 3A1, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Background: A double-blinded, placebo-controlled, cross-over design was used to investigate whether two different sodium citrate dihydrate (Na-CIT) supplementation protocols improve 200 m swimming performance in adolescent swimmers.

Methods: Ten, male swimmers (14.9 ± 0.4 years of age; 63.5 ± 4 kg) performed four 200 m time trials with the following treatments: acute (ACU) supplementation (0.5 g kg(-1) administered 120 min pre-trial), acute placebo (PLC-A), chronic (CHR) supplementation (0.1 g∙kg(-1) for three days and 0.3 g kg(-1) on the forth day 120 min pre-trial), and chronic placebo (PLC-C). The order of the trials was randomized, with at least a six-day wash-out period between trials. Blood samples were collected by finger prick pre-ingestion, 100 min post-ingestion, and 3 min post-trial. Performance time, rate of perceived exertion, pH, base excess, bicarbonate and lactate concentration were measured.

Results: Post-ingestion bicarbonate and base excess were higher (P < 0.05) in both the ACU and CHR trials compared to placebo showing adequate pre-exercise alkalosis. However, performance time, rate of perceived exertion as well as post-trial pH and lactate concentration were not significantly different between trials. Further analysis revealed that five swimmers, identified as responders, improved their performance time by 1.03% (P < 0.05) and attained higher post-trial lactate concentrations in the ACU versus PLC-A trial (P < 0.05). They also had significantly higher post-trial lactate concentrations compared to the non-responders in the ACU and CHR trials.

Conclusions: Acute supplementation of Na-CIT prior to 200 m swimming performance led to a modest time improvement and higher blood lactate concentrations in only half of the swimmers while the chronic Na-CIT supplementation did not provide any ergogenic effect in this group of adolescent swimmers.

Trial registration: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01835912.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus