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Intraosseous Angiolipoma of the Cranium: Case report and review of the literature.

Nguyen L, Zwagerman NT, Grandhi R, McFadden K, Richardson RM - Surg Neurol Int (2014)

Bottom Line: Most are found as multiple lesions and often located on the arm or trunk.We report the case of a 55-year-old male who presented with headache, nausea, vomiting, and double vision and was found to a right frontal intraosseous lesion.He was also found to have invasive ductal breast carcinoma.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neuropathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center 200 Lothrop Street, Suite B-400 15207 Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Angiolipomas are benign tumors that usually occur in patients during their late teens or early twenties. Most are found as multiple lesions and often located on the arm or trunk. Although predominantly subcutaneous lesions, intraosseous angiolipomas are primarily found in the mandible and ribs, with one case involving the calvarium reported in the literature.

Case description: We report the case of a 55-year-old male who presented with headache, nausea, vomiting, and double vision and was found to a right frontal intraosseous lesion. He was also found to have invasive ductal breast carcinoma. The patient subsequently underwent a resection and the lesion was found to be an angiolipoma.

Conclusion: We report a rare case of a calvarialangiolipoma in the setting of a male with invasive ductal breast carcinoma and a review of the literature.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Microscopic images showing the lesion and the characteristic features of an intraosseous angiolipoma. (a) The bone (arrow) is expanded by an underlying vascular and fatty lesion (× 4 magnification). (b)The lesion involves the leptomeninges (arrow) (× 4 magnification) (c) Trabeculation of bone within the lesion intermixed with the adipocytes and vessels (× 4 magnification). (d) More prominent vasculature (× 10 magnification). (e) The lesion showing evenly sized bland adipocytes and interspersed small vessels (× 10 magnification). (f) T hin fibrous septa separating the adipocytes, which lack dysplasia or hyperchromasia. The arrow shows a fibrin thrombus (× 20 magnification)
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Figure 2: Microscopic images showing the lesion and the characteristic features of an intraosseous angiolipoma. (a) The bone (arrow) is expanded by an underlying vascular and fatty lesion (× 4 magnification). (b)The lesion involves the leptomeninges (arrow) (× 4 magnification) (c) Trabeculation of bone within the lesion intermixed with the adipocytes and vessels (× 4 magnification). (d) More prominent vasculature (× 10 magnification). (e) The lesion showing evenly sized bland adipocytes and interspersed small vessels (× 10 magnification). (f) T hin fibrous septa separating the adipocytes, which lack dysplasia or hyperchromasia. The arrow shows a fibrin thrombus (× 20 magnification)

Mentions: The pathologic calvarial specimen consisted of a 5.5 × 5.5 × 0.8 cm portion of calvarium involved by an expansile lesion measuring 3.5 × 3.5 × 1.5 cm. The lesion was well-circumscribed and showed mixed areas of firm-to-soft tan and red lobulated tissue. Histopathologic analysis performed on the specimen proved the tumor to be an angiolipoma. Microscopically, the lesion consisted of mature trabecular bone intermixed with mature adipocytes and variably sized dilated vascular channels [Figure 2]. The adipose component was mature and composed of normal appearing lobules separated by thin, fibrous septa. No cytologicalatypia, hyperchromasia, mitoses, or lipoblasts were present. No increased cellularity or epithelioid cells were noted, and immunohistochemical stains for pankeratin were negative.


Intraosseous Angiolipoma of the Cranium: Case report and review of the literature.

Nguyen L, Zwagerman NT, Grandhi R, McFadden K, Richardson RM - Surg Neurol Int (2014)

Microscopic images showing the lesion and the characteristic features of an intraosseous angiolipoma. (a) The bone (arrow) is expanded by an underlying vascular and fatty lesion (× 4 magnification). (b)The lesion involves the leptomeninges (arrow) (× 4 magnification) (c) Trabeculation of bone within the lesion intermixed with the adipocytes and vessels (× 4 magnification). (d) More prominent vasculature (× 10 magnification). (e) The lesion showing evenly sized bland adipocytes and interspersed small vessels (× 10 magnification). (f) T hin fibrous septa separating the adipocytes, which lack dysplasia or hyperchromasia. The arrow shows a fibrin thrombus (× 20 magnification)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4061575&req=5

Figure 2: Microscopic images showing the lesion and the characteristic features of an intraosseous angiolipoma. (a) The bone (arrow) is expanded by an underlying vascular and fatty lesion (× 4 magnification). (b)The lesion involves the leptomeninges (arrow) (× 4 magnification) (c) Trabeculation of bone within the lesion intermixed with the adipocytes and vessels (× 4 magnification). (d) More prominent vasculature (× 10 magnification). (e) The lesion showing evenly sized bland adipocytes and interspersed small vessels (× 10 magnification). (f) T hin fibrous septa separating the adipocytes, which lack dysplasia or hyperchromasia. The arrow shows a fibrin thrombus (× 20 magnification)
Mentions: The pathologic calvarial specimen consisted of a 5.5 × 5.5 × 0.8 cm portion of calvarium involved by an expansile lesion measuring 3.5 × 3.5 × 1.5 cm. The lesion was well-circumscribed and showed mixed areas of firm-to-soft tan and red lobulated tissue. Histopathologic analysis performed on the specimen proved the tumor to be an angiolipoma. Microscopically, the lesion consisted of mature trabecular bone intermixed with mature adipocytes and variably sized dilated vascular channels [Figure 2]. The adipose component was mature and composed of normal appearing lobules separated by thin, fibrous septa. No cytologicalatypia, hyperchromasia, mitoses, or lipoblasts were present. No increased cellularity or epithelioid cells were noted, and immunohistochemical stains for pankeratin were negative.

Bottom Line: Most are found as multiple lesions and often located on the arm or trunk.We report the case of a 55-year-old male who presented with headache, nausea, vomiting, and double vision and was found to a right frontal intraosseous lesion.He was also found to have invasive ductal breast carcinoma.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neuropathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center 200 Lothrop Street, Suite B-400 15207 Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Angiolipomas are benign tumors that usually occur in patients during their late teens or early twenties. Most are found as multiple lesions and often located on the arm or trunk. Although predominantly subcutaneous lesions, intraosseous angiolipomas are primarily found in the mandible and ribs, with one case involving the calvarium reported in the literature.

Case description: We report the case of a 55-year-old male who presented with headache, nausea, vomiting, and double vision and was found to a right frontal intraosseous lesion. He was also found to have invasive ductal breast carcinoma. The patient subsequently underwent a resection and the lesion was found to be an angiolipoma.

Conclusion: We report a rare case of a calvarialangiolipoma in the setting of a male with invasive ductal breast carcinoma and a review of the literature.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus