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Intraosseous Angiolipoma of the Cranium: Case report and review of the literature.

Nguyen L, Zwagerman NT, Grandhi R, McFadden K, Richardson RM - Surg Neurol Int (2014)

Bottom Line: Most are found as multiple lesions and often located on the arm or trunk.We report the case of a 55-year-old male who presented with headache, nausea, vomiting, and double vision and was found to a right frontal intraosseous lesion.He was also found to have invasive ductal breast carcinoma.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neuropathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center 200 Lothrop Street, Suite B-400 15207 Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Angiolipomas are benign tumors that usually occur in patients during their late teens or early twenties. Most are found as multiple lesions and often located on the arm or trunk. Although predominantly subcutaneous lesions, intraosseous angiolipomas are primarily found in the mandible and ribs, with one case involving the calvarium reported in the literature.

Case description: We report the case of a 55-year-old male who presented with headache, nausea, vomiting, and double vision and was found to a right frontal intraosseous lesion. He was also found to have invasive ductal breast carcinoma. The patient subsequently underwent a resection and the lesion was found to be an angiolipoma.

Conclusion: We report a rare case of a calvarialangiolipoma in the setting of a male with invasive ductal breast carcinoma and a review of the literature.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Noncontrasted CT head axial images indicate a right frontal bony lesion with mixed fat and boney trabeculae. (a) Brain windowing, (d) Bone windowing. MRI brain, (b) T1-weighted image, (c) Contrast enhanced image, (e) Sagittal T1 image, (f) Coronal contrast enhanced image
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Figure 1: Noncontrasted CT head axial images indicate a right frontal bony lesion with mixed fat and boney trabeculae. (a) Brain windowing, (d) Bone windowing. MRI brain, (b) T1-weighted image, (c) Contrast enhanced image, (e) Sagittal T1 image, (f) Coronal contrast enhanced image

Mentions: A 55-year-old right handed male with a past medical history of diabetes, hypertension, and a greater than 10 pack-year history of cigarette smoking, presented with headache, nausea, vomiting, and worsening double vision. On physical examination, the patient was alert and oriented. His cranial nerves were intact. He was noted to have facial asymmetry and slight mass over the right forehead. Further on examination it was noted that he had a lesion on his right breast and nipple that he reported had been present for approximately one year, with occasional enlargement, bleeding, and purulent discharge. He had no lymphadenopathy on examination. Noncontrast computed tomography (CT) head indicated a 4.3 × 2.2 × 1.7 cm right frontal calvarial lesion, with internal trabeculated bone mixed with fatty components, and no associated involvement of overlying soft tissue or brain parenchyma [Figure 1]. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain confirmed the presence of a right sided heterogeneously enhancing calvarial lesion with mild mass effect on the adjacent frontal lobe [Figure 1]. A CT of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis showed a soft tissue density in the right retroareolar space, corresponding to the location of the painful breast lesion, and associated with enlarged right hilar and subcarinal lymph nodes.


Intraosseous Angiolipoma of the Cranium: Case report and review of the literature.

Nguyen L, Zwagerman NT, Grandhi R, McFadden K, Richardson RM - Surg Neurol Int (2014)

Noncontrasted CT head axial images indicate a right frontal bony lesion with mixed fat and boney trabeculae. (a) Brain windowing, (d) Bone windowing. MRI brain, (b) T1-weighted image, (c) Contrast enhanced image, (e) Sagittal T1 image, (f) Coronal contrast enhanced image
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4061575&req=5

Figure 1: Noncontrasted CT head axial images indicate a right frontal bony lesion with mixed fat and boney trabeculae. (a) Brain windowing, (d) Bone windowing. MRI brain, (b) T1-weighted image, (c) Contrast enhanced image, (e) Sagittal T1 image, (f) Coronal contrast enhanced image
Mentions: A 55-year-old right handed male with a past medical history of diabetes, hypertension, and a greater than 10 pack-year history of cigarette smoking, presented with headache, nausea, vomiting, and worsening double vision. On physical examination, the patient was alert and oriented. His cranial nerves were intact. He was noted to have facial asymmetry and slight mass over the right forehead. Further on examination it was noted that he had a lesion on his right breast and nipple that he reported had been present for approximately one year, with occasional enlargement, bleeding, and purulent discharge. He had no lymphadenopathy on examination. Noncontrast computed tomography (CT) head indicated a 4.3 × 2.2 × 1.7 cm right frontal calvarial lesion, with internal trabeculated bone mixed with fatty components, and no associated involvement of overlying soft tissue or brain parenchyma [Figure 1]. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain confirmed the presence of a right sided heterogeneously enhancing calvarial lesion with mild mass effect on the adjacent frontal lobe [Figure 1]. A CT of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis showed a soft tissue density in the right retroareolar space, corresponding to the location of the painful breast lesion, and associated with enlarged right hilar and subcarinal lymph nodes.

Bottom Line: Most are found as multiple lesions and often located on the arm or trunk.We report the case of a 55-year-old male who presented with headache, nausea, vomiting, and double vision and was found to a right frontal intraosseous lesion.He was also found to have invasive ductal breast carcinoma.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neuropathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center 200 Lothrop Street, Suite B-400 15207 Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Angiolipomas are benign tumors that usually occur in patients during their late teens or early twenties. Most are found as multiple lesions and often located on the arm or trunk. Although predominantly subcutaneous lesions, intraosseous angiolipomas are primarily found in the mandible and ribs, with one case involving the calvarium reported in the literature.

Case description: We report the case of a 55-year-old male who presented with headache, nausea, vomiting, and double vision and was found to a right frontal intraosseous lesion. He was also found to have invasive ductal breast carcinoma. The patient subsequently underwent a resection and the lesion was found to be an angiolipoma.

Conclusion: We report a rare case of a calvarialangiolipoma in the setting of a male with invasive ductal breast carcinoma and a review of the literature.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus