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Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and radiotherapy-induced carotid atherosclerosis in subjects with head and neck cancer.

Pereira EB, Gemignani T, Sposito AC, Matos-Souza JR, Nadruz W - Radiat Oncol (2014)

Bottom Line: Significant increases in carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) (0.95 ± 0.08 vs. 0.87 ± 0.05 mm; p < 0.0001) and carotid IMT/diameter ratio (0.138 ± 0.013 vs. 0.129 ± 0.014; p = 0.001) were observed after RT, while no changes in popliteal structural features were detected.In addition, baseline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels showed a direct correlation with RT-induced carotid IMT change (r = 0.66; p = 0.027), while no other studied variable exhibited a significant relationship with carotid IMT change.These results indicate that RT-induced atherosclerosis is limited to the irradiated area and also suggest that it may be predicted by low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in subjects with head and neck cancer.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Cidade Universitária "Zeferino Vaz", Campinas, SP 13081-970, Brasil. wilnj@fcm.unicamp.br.

ABSTRACT

Background: Radiotherapy (RT) is a risk factor for accelerated carotid artery atherosclerotic disease in subjects with head and neck cancer. However, the risk factors of RT-induced carotid artery remodeling are not established. This study aimed to investigate the effects of RT on carotid and popliteal arteries in subjects with head and neck cancer and to evaluate the relationship between baseline clinical and laboratory features and the progression of RT-induced atherosclerosis.

Findings: Eleven men (age = 57.9 ± 6.2years) with head and neck cancer who underwent cervical bilateral irradiation were prospectively examined by clinical and laboratory analysis and by carotid and popliteal ultrasound before and after treatment (mean interval between the end of RT and the post-RT assessment = 181 ± 47 days). No studied subject used hypocholesterolemic medications. Significant increases in carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) (0.95 ± 0.08 vs. 0.87 ± 0.05 mm; p < 0.0001) and carotid IMT/diameter ratio (0.138 ± 0.013 vs. 0.129 ± 0.014; p = 0.001) were observed after RT, while no changes in popliteal structural features were detected. In addition, baseline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels showed a direct correlation with RT-induced carotid IMT change (r = 0.66; p = 0.027), while no other studied variable exhibited a significant relationship with carotid IMT change.

Conclusions: These results indicate that RT-induced atherosclerosis is limited to the irradiated area and also suggest that it may be predicted by low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in subjects with head and neck cancer.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Bivariate correlation between baseline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-cholesterol) levels and radiotherapy-induced carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) change.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Figure 1: Bivariate correlation between baseline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-cholesterol) levels and radiotherapy-induced carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) change.

Mentions: Clinical and laboratory features of studied subjects before and after RT sessions are shown in Table 1. No differences in clinical and laboratory characteristics were detected after RT in comparison with the pre-RT time point. The vascular features of studied subjects are shown in Table 2. Carotid IMT and carotid IMT/diameter ratio showed significant increases after RT, while no changes in carotid diameters or in any popliteal variable were detected after radiation therapy. In addition, 1 (9%) and 2 (18%) subjects presented popliteal and carotid plaques before RT, respectively, while 1 (9%) and 4 (36%) subjects presented popliteal and carotid plaques after RT. However, the differences in carotid plaques prevalence before and after RT did not reach statistical significance.In order to investigate potential predictors of RT-induced carotid atherosclerosis, bivariate correlation analysis between carotid IMT change (the difference between post-RT and pre-RT carotid IMT measurements) and baseline clinical and laboratory features was performed. Baseline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels showed a direct correlation with carotid IMT change (r = 0.66; p-0.027) (Figure 1), while no other clinical and laboratory variable, including the interval between the end of RT and the post-RT assessment, exhibited a significant correlation with carotid IMT change.


Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and radiotherapy-induced carotid atherosclerosis in subjects with head and neck cancer.

Pereira EB, Gemignani T, Sposito AC, Matos-Souza JR, Nadruz W - Radiat Oncol (2014)

Bivariate correlation between baseline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-cholesterol) levels and radiotherapy-induced carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) change.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4061515&req=5

Figure 1: Bivariate correlation between baseline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-cholesterol) levels and radiotherapy-induced carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) change.
Mentions: Clinical and laboratory features of studied subjects before and after RT sessions are shown in Table 1. No differences in clinical and laboratory characteristics were detected after RT in comparison with the pre-RT time point. The vascular features of studied subjects are shown in Table 2. Carotid IMT and carotid IMT/diameter ratio showed significant increases after RT, while no changes in carotid diameters or in any popliteal variable were detected after radiation therapy. In addition, 1 (9%) and 2 (18%) subjects presented popliteal and carotid plaques before RT, respectively, while 1 (9%) and 4 (36%) subjects presented popliteal and carotid plaques after RT. However, the differences in carotid plaques prevalence before and after RT did not reach statistical significance.In order to investigate potential predictors of RT-induced carotid atherosclerosis, bivariate correlation analysis between carotid IMT change (the difference between post-RT and pre-RT carotid IMT measurements) and baseline clinical and laboratory features was performed. Baseline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels showed a direct correlation with carotid IMT change (r = 0.66; p-0.027) (Figure 1), while no other clinical and laboratory variable, including the interval between the end of RT and the post-RT assessment, exhibited a significant correlation with carotid IMT change.

Bottom Line: Significant increases in carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) (0.95 ± 0.08 vs. 0.87 ± 0.05 mm; p < 0.0001) and carotid IMT/diameter ratio (0.138 ± 0.013 vs. 0.129 ± 0.014; p = 0.001) were observed after RT, while no changes in popliteal structural features were detected.In addition, baseline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels showed a direct correlation with RT-induced carotid IMT change (r = 0.66; p = 0.027), while no other studied variable exhibited a significant relationship with carotid IMT change.These results indicate that RT-induced atherosclerosis is limited to the irradiated area and also suggest that it may be predicted by low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in subjects with head and neck cancer.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Cidade Universitária "Zeferino Vaz", Campinas, SP 13081-970, Brasil. wilnj@fcm.unicamp.br.

ABSTRACT

Background: Radiotherapy (RT) is a risk factor for accelerated carotid artery atherosclerotic disease in subjects with head and neck cancer. However, the risk factors of RT-induced carotid artery remodeling are not established. This study aimed to investigate the effects of RT on carotid and popliteal arteries in subjects with head and neck cancer and to evaluate the relationship between baseline clinical and laboratory features and the progression of RT-induced atherosclerosis.

Findings: Eleven men (age = 57.9 ± 6.2years) with head and neck cancer who underwent cervical bilateral irradiation were prospectively examined by clinical and laboratory analysis and by carotid and popliteal ultrasound before and after treatment (mean interval between the end of RT and the post-RT assessment = 181 ± 47 days). No studied subject used hypocholesterolemic medications. Significant increases in carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) (0.95 ± 0.08 vs. 0.87 ± 0.05 mm; p < 0.0001) and carotid IMT/diameter ratio (0.138 ± 0.013 vs. 0.129 ± 0.014; p = 0.001) were observed after RT, while no changes in popliteal structural features were detected. In addition, baseline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels showed a direct correlation with RT-induced carotid IMT change (r = 0.66; p = 0.027), while no other studied variable exhibited a significant relationship with carotid IMT change.

Conclusions: These results indicate that RT-induced atherosclerosis is limited to the irradiated area and also suggest that it may be predicted by low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in subjects with head and neck cancer.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus