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Clival lesion incidentally discovered on cone-beam computed tomography: A case report and review of the literature.

Jadhav AB, Tadinada A, Rengasamy K, Fellows D, Lurie AG - Imaging Sci Dent (2014)

Bottom Line: Further, on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the lesion showed a homogenously low T1 signal intensity with mild internal enhancement after post-gadolinium and a heterogeneous T2 signal intensity.These signal characteristics might be attributed to the fibrous tissues, chondroid matrix, calcific material, or cystic component of the lesion; thus, chondroblastoma and chondromyxoid fibroma were added to the differential diagnosis.Although this report was limited by the lack of final diagnosis and the patient lost to follow-up, the incidental skull base finding would be important for interpreting the entire volume of CBCT by a qualified oral and maxillofacial radiologist.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine, Farmington, CT, USA.

ABSTRACT
An osteolytic lesion with a small central area of mineralization and sclerotic borders was discovered incidentally in the clivus on the cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) of a 27-year-old male patient. This benign appearance indicated a primary differential diagnosis of non-aggressive lesions such as fibro-osseous lesions and arrested pneumatization. Further, on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the lesion showed a homogenously low T1 signal intensity with mild internal enhancement after post-gadolinium and a heterogeneous T2 signal intensity. These signal characteristics might be attributed to the fibrous tissues, chondroid matrix, calcific material, or cystic component of the lesion; thus, chondroblastoma and chondromyxoid fibroma were added to the differential diagnosis. Although this report was limited by the lack of final diagnosis and the patient lost to follow-up, the incidental skull base finding would be important for interpreting the entire volume of CBCT by a qualified oral and maxillofacial radiologist.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

SPECT study shows very mild uptake in the right mandibular condyle.
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Figure 2: SPECT study shows very mild uptake in the right mandibular condyle.

Mentions: A 27-year-old male patient visited the Department of Orthodontics in the University of Connecticut, School of Dental Medicine with the chief complaint of an "asymmetric face." The consulting orthodontist performed a facial and dental evaluation and arrived at a working diagnosis of facial asymmetry associated with skeletal malocclusion. An initial panoramic radiograph was taken to evaluate the maxillofacial complex. The panoramic image and posterior-anterior (PA view) showed an asymmetry of the mandible with deviation to the left side and slightly increased dimension of the right side of the jaw (Fig. 1). The oral and maxillofacial (OMF) surgeon suspected condylar hyperplasia, and to further evaluate the growth of the condyle, a single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) study of the mandible was requested. The SPECT study showed a mild increase in the tracer uptake on the right side, but it was not significant enough to suggest active growth (Fig. 2). To correct the facial asymmetry and the skeletal malocclusion, which was the patient's chief complaint, an orthognathic surgery was planned. The patient was at this point referred to the Advanced Oral and Maxillofacial Imaging Center at the University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine for a pre-surgical evaluation using CBCT.


Clival lesion incidentally discovered on cone-beam computed tomography: A case report and review of the literature.

Jadhav AB, Tadinada A, Rengasamy K, Fellows D, Lurie AG - Imaging Sci Dent (2014)

SPECT study shows very mild uptake in the right mandibular condyle.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4061302&req=5

Figure 2: SPECT study shows very mild uptake in the right mandibular condyle.
Mentions: A 27-year-old male patient visited the Department of Orthodontics in the University of Connecticut, School of Dental Medicine with the chief complaint of an "asymmetric face." The consulting orthodontist performed a facial and dental evaluation and arrived at a working diagnosis of facial asymmetry associated with skeletal malocclusion. An initial panoramic radiograph was taken to evaluate the maxillofacial complex. The panoramic image and posterior-anterior (PA view) showed an asymmetry of the mandible with deviation to the left side and slightly increased dimension of the right side of the jaw (Fig. 1). The oral and maxillofacial (OMF) surgeon suspected condylar hyperplasia, and to further evaluate the growth of the condyle, a single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) study of the mandible was requested. The SPECT study showed a mild increase in the tracer uptake on the right side, but it was not significant enough to suggest active growth (Fig. 2). To correct the facial asymmetry and the skeletal malocclusion, which was the patient's chief complaint, an orthognathic surgery was planned. The patient was at this point referred to the Advanced Oral and Maxillofacial Imaging Center at the University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine for a pre-surgical evaluation using CBCT.

Bottom Line: Further, on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the lesion showed a homogenously low T1 signal intensity with mild internal enhancement after post-gadolinium and a heterogeneous T2 signal intensity.These signal characteristics might be attributed to the fibrous tissues, chondroid matrix, calcific material, or cystic component of the lesion; thus, chondroblastoma and chondromyxoid fibroma were added to the differential diagnosis.Although this report was limited by the lack of final diagnosis and the patient lost to follow-up, the incidental skull base finding would be important for interpreting the entire volume of CBCT by a qualified oral and maxillofacial radiologist.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine, Farmington, CT, USA.

ABSTRACT
An osteolytic lesion with a small central area of mineralization and sclerotic borders was discovered incidentally in the clivus on the cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) of a 27-year-old male patient. This benign appearance indicated a primary differential diagnosis of non-aggressive lesions such as fibro-osseous lesions and arrested pneumatization. Further, on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the lesion showed a homogenously low T1 signal intensity with mild internal enhancement after post-gadolinium and a heterogeneous T2 signal intensity. These signal characteristics might be attributed to the fibrous tissues, chondroid matrix, calcific material, or cystic component of the lesion; thus, chondroblastoma and chondromyxoid fibroma were added to the differential diagnosis. Although this report was limited by the lack of final diagnosis and the patient lost to follow-up, the incidental skull base finding would be important for interpreting the entire volume of CBCT by a qualified oral and maxillofacial radiologist.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus