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Use of a gesture user interface as a touchless image navigation system in dental surgery: Case series report.

Rosa GM, Elizondo ML - Imaging Sci Dent (2014)

Bottom Line: No complications were reported.The system performed very well and was very useful.The solution with an NUI with touchless control of the images seems to be closer to an ideal.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CORE Dental Clinic, Resistencia, Argentina.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The purposes of this study were to develop a workstation computer that allowed intraoperative touchless control of diagnostic and surgical images by a surgeon, and to report the preliminary experience with the use of the system in a series of cases in which dental surgery was performed.

Materials and methods: A custom workstation with a new motion sensing input device (Leap Motion) was set up in order to use a natural user interface (NUI) to manipulate the imaging software by hand gestures. The system allowed intraoperative touchless control of the surgical images.

Results: For the first time in the literature, an NUI system was used for a pilot study during 11 dental surgery procedures including tooth extractions, dental implant placements, and guided bone regeneration. No complications were reported. The system performed very well and was very useful.

Conclusion: The proposed system fulfilled the objective of providing touchless access and control of the system of images and a three-dimensional surgical plan, thus allowing the maintenance of sterile conditions. The interaction between surgical staff, under sterile conditions, and computer equipment has been a key issue. The solution with an NUI with touchless control of the images seems to be closer to an ideal. The cost of the sensor system is quite low; this could facilitate its incorporation into the practice of routine dental surgery. This technology has enormous potential in dental surgery and other healthcare specialties.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A. Photograph shows the general view of use of the natural user interface that enables touchless control of the imaging system and helps to maintain the surgical environment during surgery. The system can be controlled with two fingers of one hand (B), or one finger of each of the two hands (C) can be used to control the images by two points (for modification of scale, zooming, or rotation).
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Figure 2: A. Photograph shows the general view of use of the natural user interface that enables touchless control of the imaging system and helps to maintain the surgical environment during surgery. The system can be controlled with two fingers of one hand (B), or one finger of each of the two hands (C) can be used to control the images by two points (for modification of scale, zooming, or rotation).

Mentions: Before and during the operations, the customized system was used for navigating through periapical radiographic images, panoramic radiographic images, and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) 2D digital images, and manipulating the preliminary 3D simulation model of the planned implant surgery and intraoperatory intraoral digital X-ray images. The abovementioned system allowed intraoperative touchless control during the surgery (Fig. 2). This system recognized gestures that emulated touching a vertical virtual touch surface in the air (in the interaction zone above the sensor). When the operator pointed one or two fingers towards the screen, the system drew a cursor on the screen so that the operator could point items or buttons in the software, and when the operator moved the finger farther towards the screen, the pointed item was selected (similar to a mouse click). The functions that required two points of control (modification of scale, zoom, or rotation) could be controlled with two fingers of one hand, or one finger of each of the two hands. By the use of this hand gesture, the surgeon was able to navigate through the windows, zooming in and out, manipulate the different images and slices, and use imaging tools such as the adjustment of image contrast or brightness, image enhancements, and measurement. It was possible to move and rotate the 3D implant surgery planning model, during dental implant procedures. Further, the system was used to manipulate (zoom in or out, and enhance contrast) the new intraoperatory digital X-ray images to confirm the correct position of the surgical guides and the final position of implants or to radiographically evaluate the outcome of the procedures.


Use of a gesture user interface as a touchless image navigation system in dental surgery: Case series report.

Rosa GM, Elizondo ML - Imaging Sci Dent (2014)

A. Photograph shows the general view of use of the natural user interface that enables touchless control of the imaging system and helps to maintain the surgical environment during surgery. The system can be controlled with two fingers of one hand (B), or one finger of each of the two hands (C) can be used to control the images by two points (for modification of scale, zooming, or rotation).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4061300&req=5

Figure 2: A. Photograph shows the general view of use of the natural user interface that enables touchless control of the imaging system and helps to maintain the surgical environment during surgery. The system can be controlled with two fingers of one hand (B), or one finger of each of the two hands (C) can be used to control the images by two points (for modification of scale, zooming, or rotation).
Mentions: Before and during the operations, the customized system was used for navigating through periapical radiographic images, panoramic radiographic images, and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) 2D digital images, and manipulating the preliminary 3D simulation model of the planned implant surgery and intraoperatory intraoral digital X-ray images. The abovementioned system allowed intraoperative touchless control during the surgery (Fig. 2). This system recognized gestures that emulated touching a vertical virtual touch surface in the air (in the interaction zone above the sensor). When the operator pointed one or two fingers towards the screen, the system drew a cursor on the screen so that the operator could point items or buttons in the software, and when the operator moved the finger farther towards the screen, the pointed item was selected (similar to a mouse click). The functions that required two points of control (modification of scale, zoom, or rotation) could be controlled with two fingers of one hand, or one finger of each of the two hands. By the use of this hand gesture, the surgeon was able to navigate through the windows, zooming in and out, manipulate the different images and slices, and use imaging tools such as the adjustment of image contrast or brightness, image enhancements, and measurement. It was possible to move and rotate the 3D implant surgery planning model, during dental implant procedures. Further, the system was used to manipulate (zoom in or out, and enhance contrast) the new intraoperatory digital X-ray images to confirm the correct position of the surgical guides and the final position of implants or to radiographically evaluate the outcome of the procedures.

Bottom Line: No complications were reported.The system performed very well and was very useful.The solution with an NUI with touchless control of the images seems to be closer to an ideal.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CORE Dental Clinic, Resistencia, Argentina.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The purposes of this study were to develop a workstation computer that allowed intraoperative touchless control of diagnostic and surgical images by a surgeon, and to report the preliminary experience with the use of the system in a series of cases in which dental surgery was performed.

Materials and methods: A custom workstation with a new motion sensing input device (Leap Motion) was set up in order to use a natural user interface (NUI) to manipulate the imaging software by hand gestures. The system allowed intraoperative touchless control of the surgical images.

Results: For the first time in the literature, an NUI system was used for a pilot study during 11 dental surgery procedures including tooth extractions, dental implant placements, and guided bone regeneration. No complications were reported. The system performed very well and was very useful.

Conclusion: The proposed system fulfilled the objective of providing touchless access and control of the system of images and a three-dimensional surgical plan, thus allowing the maintenance of sterile conditions. The interaction between surgical staff, under sterile conditions, and computer equipment has been a key issue. The solution with an NUI with touchless control of the images seems to be closer to an ideal. The cost of the sensor system is quite low; this could facilitate its incorporation into the practice of routine dental surgery. This technology has enormous potential in dental surgery and other healthcare specialties.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus