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Direct identification of Mycobacterium abscessus through 16S rDNA sequence analysis and a citrate utilization test: A case report.

Zou Z, Liu Y, Zhu B, Zeng P - Exp Ther Med (2014)

Bottom Line: The particular case reported in this study initially manifested as hyperglycemia and papules in the right leg.Routine cultures for fungus were repeatedly negative.The current report may help other clinicians to make a quick and accurate diagnosis of RGM infection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Center of Laboratory Medicine, General Hospital of Chengdu Military Region of PLA, Chengdu 610083, P.R. China.

ABSTRACT
A growing number of nontuberculous mycobacteria infection cases, especially those caused by rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM), have been reported in the past decade. Conventional methods for mycobacteria diagnosis are inefficient and easily lead to misdiagnosis. New detection methods, such as gene sequencing, have been reported but are not widely used. The aim of the present case report was to provide a quick and exact method of identifying Myobacterium abscessus (M. abscessus) infections. The particular case reported in this study initially manifested as hyperglycemia and papules in the right leg. Routine cultures for fungus were repeatedly negative. However, cultures of the purulent material under aerobic cultivation for five days yielded a rapidly growing, nontuberculous mycobacterium. A Ziehl-Neelsen staining of this mycobacterium revealed the presence of acid-fast bacilli that were finally identified as M. abscessus through 16S rDNA sequence analysis and a citrate utilization test. The current report may help other clinicians to make a quick and accurate diagnosis of RGM infection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Improvement following treatment. The patient’s condition significantly improved with diminishing cutaneous lesions following a week of treatment with intravenous sulfamethoxazole 800 mg twice daily and imipenem 1 g twice daily.
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f3-etm-08-01-0115: Improvement following treatment. The patient’s condition significantly improved with diminishing cutaneous lesions following a week of treatment with intravenous sulfamethoxazole 800 mg twice daily and imipenem 1 g twice daily.

Mentions: The identification of this RGM isolate was further confirmed by DNA sequence analysis of 16S rDNA (corresponding to E. coli positions 27 to 1492 bp) using qPCR primers 27F (5′-AGAGTTTGATCCTGGCTCAG-3′) and 1492R (5′-GGYTACCTTGTTACGACTT-3′). The results revealed a sequence similarity of 100% with M. abscessus (GenBank accession no. NR_074427.1) and 99% with M. chelonae (GenBank accession no. AM884326.1). A citrate utilization test was then carried out and the result was negative. The pathogenic bacterium was ultimately identified as M. abscessus. Treatment was initiated with intravenous sulfamethoxazole 800 mg twice daily and imipenem 1 g twice daily in combination with debridement. One week later the condition of the patient was significantly improved with exudate cessation and diminishing cutaneous lesions (Fig. 3).


Direct identification of Mycobacterium abscessus through 16S rDNA sequence analysis and a citrate utilization test: A case report.

Zou Z, Liu Y, Zhu B, Zeng P - Exp Ther Med (2014)

Improvement following treatment. The patient’s condition significantly improved with diminishing cutaneous lesions following a week of treatment with intravenous sulfamethoxazole 800 mg twice daily and imipenem 1 g twice daily.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4061238&req=5

f3-etm-08-01-0115: Improvement following treatment. The patient’s condition significantly improved with diminishing cutaneous lesions following a week of treatment with intravenous sulfamethoxazole 800 mg twice daily and imipenem 1 g twice daily.
Mentions: The identification of this RGM isolate was further confirmed by DNA sequence analysis of 16S rDNA (corresponding to E. coli positions 27 to 1492 bp) using qPCR primers 27F (5′-AGAGTTTGATCCTGGCTCAG-3′) and 1492R (5′-GGYTACCTTGTTACGACTT-3′). The results revealed a sequence similarity of 100% with M. abscessus (GenBank accession no. NR_074427.1) and 99% with M. chelonae (GenBank accession no. AM884326.1). A citrate utilization test was then carried out and the result was negative. The pathogenic bacterium was ultimately identified as M. abscessus. Treatment was initiated with intravenous sulfamethoxazole 800 mg twice daily and imipenem 1 g twice daily in combination with debridement. One week later the condition of the patient was significantly improved with exudate cessation and diminishing cutaneous lesions (Fig. 3).

Bottom Line: The particular case reported in this study initially manifested as hyperglycemia and papules in the right leg.Routine cultures for fungus were repeatedly negative.The current report may help other clinicians to make a quick and accurate diagnosis of RGM infection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Center of Laboratory Medicine, General Hospital of Chengdu Military Region of PLA, Chengdu 610083, P.R. China.

ABSTRACT
A growing number of nontuberculous mycobacteria infection cases, especially those caused by rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM), have been reported in the past decade. Conventional methods for mycobacteria diagnosis are inefficient and easily lead to misdiagnosis. New detection methods, such as gene sequencing, have been reported but are not widely used. The aim of the present case report was to provide a quick and exact method of identifying Myobacterium abscessus (M. abscessus) infections. The particular case reported in this study initially manifested as hyperglycemia and papules in the right leg. Routine cultures for fungus were repeatedly negative. However, cultures of the purulent material under aerobic cultivation for five days yielded a rapidly growing, nontuberculous mycobacterium. A Ziehl-Neelsen staining of this mycobacterium revealed the presence of acid-fast bacilli that were finally identified as M. abscessus through 16S rDNA sequence analysis and a citrate utilization test. The current report may help other clinicians to make a quick and accurate diagnosis of RGM infection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus