Limits...
Eosinophilic cystitis in a patient with hypereosinophila syndrome: A case report.

Jiang P, Wang C, Jin B, Lin Y, Chen S - Exp Ther Med (2014)

Bottom Line: In rare cases, the urinary bladder may also be involved.The diagnosis of eosinophilic cystitis associated HES was established.Although eosinophilic cystitis is not commonly the primary manifestation of HES, eosinophilic cystitis should be taken into consideration following the onset of urinary symptoms in patients with HES.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310003, P.R. China.

ABSTRACT
Hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) is a rare disorder that is characterized by hypereosinophilia and organ damage, caused by the infiltration of eosinophils. In rare cases, the urinary bladder may also be involved. The current case report presented a 56-year-old male with gross hematuria and hypereosinophilia. The diagnosis of eosinophilic cystitis associated HES was established. Oral prednisone with a slow tapering regimen was administered as the primary treatment for the patient, which achieved partial hematological remission and complete relief of cystitis during a six-month follow-up period. Although eosinophilic cystitis is not commonly the primary manifestation of HES, eosinophilic cystitis should be taken into consideration following the onset of urinary symptoms in patients with HES.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) Computed tomography image of the pelvis showing diffuse thickening of the bladder wall. (B) Cystoscopy observations revealed an erythematous velvety appearance of the bladder mucosa.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4061232&req=5

f1-etm-08-01-0049: (A) Computed tomography image of the pelvis showing diffuse thickening of the bladder wall. (B) Cystoscopy observations revealed an erythematous velvety appearance of the bladder mucosa.

Mentions: A 56-year-old male with one month history of gross hematuria and urinary urgency was admitted to our hospital on December 2012. The patient had no significant past medical history and the physical examination was unremarkable. Initial ultrasonography revealed marked thickening of the bladder wall, which was further confirmed by computed tomography scans (Fig. 1). Laboratory examinations revealed a white blood cell count of 16.8×103 cells/mm3 (reference range, 4.0–10.0×103 cells/mm3) and significant eosinophilia of 36% (reference range, 0.5–5.0%). Stool analysis for ova and parasites was negative. Cystoscopic examination was conducted and the observations revealed an erythematous velvety appearance of the bladder mucosa (Fig. 1). A biopsy was performed and the bladder mucosa showed diffuse infiltration of eosinophils, which indicated eosinophilic cystitis (Fig. 2). Bone marrow aspiration revealed marked eosinophilia, but no primitive cell predominance, which eliminated a diagnosis of leukemia. Therefore, hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) complicated with eosinophilic cystitis was diagnosed and oral prednisone with a slow tapering regimen was administered to the patient for 6 weeks.


Eosinophilic cystitis in a patient with hypereosinophila syndrome: A case report.

Jiang P, Wang C, Jin B, Lin Y, Chen S - Exp Ther Med (2014)

(A) Computed tomography image of the pelvis showing diffuse thickening of the bladder wall. (B) Cystoscopy observations revealed an erythematous velvety appearance of the bladder mucosa.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4061232&req=5

f1-etm-08-01-0049: (A) Computed tomography image of the pelvis showing diffuse thickening of the bladder wall. (B) Cystoscopy observations revealed an erythematous velvety appearance of the bladder mucosa.
Mentions: A 56-year-old male with one month history of gross hematuria and urinary urgency was admitted to our hospital on December 2012. The patient had no significant past medical history and the physical examination was unremarkable. Initial ultrasonography revealed marked thickening of the bladder wall, which was further confirmed by computed tomography scans (Fig. 1). Laboratory examinations revealed a white blood cell count of 16.8×103 cells/mm3 (reference range, 4.0–10.0×103 cells/mm3) and significant eosinophilia of 36% (reference range, 0.5–5.0%). Stool analysis for ova and parasites was negative. Cystoscopic examination was conducted and the observations revealed an erythematous velvety appearance of the bladder mucosa (Fig. 1). A biopsy was performed and the bladder mucosa showed diffuse infiltration of eosinophils, which indicated eosinophilic cystitis (Fig. 2). Bone marrow aspiration revealed marked eosinophilia, but no primitive cell predominance, which eliminated a diagnosis of leukemia. Therefore, hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) complicated with eosinophilic cystitis was diagnosed and oral prednisone with a slow tapering regimen was administered to the patient for 6 weeks.

Bottom Line: In rare cases, the urinary bladder may also be involved.The diagnosis of eosinophilic cystitis associated HES was established.Although eosinophilic cystitis is not commonly the primary manifestation of HES, eosinophilic cystitis should be taken into consideration following the onset of urinary symptoms in patients with HES.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310003, P.R. China.

ABSTRACT
Hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) is a rare disorder that is characterized by hypereosinophilia and organ damage, caused by the infiltration of eosinophils. In rare cases, the urinary bladder may also be involved. The current case report presented a 56-year-old male with gross hematuria and hypereosinophilia. The diagnosis of eosinophilic cystitis associated HES was established. Oral prednisone with a slow tapering regimen was administered as the primary treatment for the patient, which achieved partial hematological remission and complete relief of cystitis during a six-month follow-up period. Although eosinophilic cystitis is not commonly the primary manifestation of HES, eosinophilic cystitis should be taken into consideration following the onset of urinary symptoms in patients with HES.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus