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Nanoparticles for hyperthermic therapy: synthesis strategies and applications in glioblastoma.

Verma J, Lal S, Van Noorden CJ - Int J Nanomedicine (2014)

Bottom Line: Despite recent advances, survival of GBM patients remains poor.Major challenges in GBM treatment are drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier, restriction of damage to healthy brain tissues, and limitation of resistance to therapies.Third, it discusses different methodologies for synthesis of each inorganic agent.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA ; Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Hypertension, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and most aggressive malignant primary brain tumor in humans. Current GBM treatment includes surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy, sometimes supplemented with novel therapies. Despite recent advances, survival of GBM patients remains poor. Major challenges in GBM treatment are drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier, restriction of damage to healthy brain tissues, and limitation of resistance to therapies. This article reviews recent advances in the application of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), gold nanorods (GNRs), and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for hyperthermia ablation of GBM. First, the article introduces GBM, its current treatment, and hyperthermia as a potential modality for the management of GBM. Second, it introduces MNPs, GNRs, and CNTs as inorganic agents to induce hyperthermia in GBM. Third, it discusses different methodologies for synthesis of each inorganic agent. Finally, it reviews in vitro and in vivo studies in which MNPs, GNRs, and CNTs have been applied for hyperthermia ablation and drug delivery in GBM.

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Layer-by-layer self-assembly and permeability test for microcapsules embedded with ferromagnetic gold-coated cobalt nanoparticles under an oscillating magnetic field. Reprinted with permission from Zonghuan L, Malcolm PD, Zhanhu G, et al. Magnestic switch of permeability for polyelectrolyte microcapsules embedded with nanoparticles. Langmuir. 2005;21:2042–2050. Copyright © 2005. American Chemical Society.109Abbreviations: Co@Au, ferromagnetic gold-coated cobalt; FITC, fluorescein isothiocyanate; MnCO3, manganese carbonate.
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f6-ijn-9-2863: Layer-by-layer self-assembly and permeability test for microcapsules embedded with ferromagnetic gold-coated cobalt nanoparticles under an oscillating magnetic field. Reprinted with permission from Zonghuan L, Malcolm PD, Zhanhu G, et al. Magnestic switch of permeability for polyelectrolyte microcapsules embedded with nanoparticles. Langmuir. 2005;21:2042–2050. Copyright © 2005. American Chemical Society.109Abbreviations: Co@Au, ferromagnetic gold-coated cobalt; FITC, fluorescein isothiocyanate; MnCO3, manganese carbonate.

Mentions: More recently, implantable microchips have been developed on the basis of MNPs, such as a novel drug-delivery chip for magnetically-controlled release of anti-epileptic drugs95,96 (Figure 6). The chip was made of an electrically-conductive flexible polyethylene terephthalate substrate that contained drug-loaded magnetic SPION-core-silica-shell nanoparticles.


Nanoparticles for hyperthermic therapy: synthesis strategies and applications in glioblastoma.

Verma J, Lal S, Van Noorden CJ - Int J Nanomedicine (2014)

Layer-by-layer self-assembly and permeability test for microcapsules embedded with ferromagnetic gold-coated cobalt nanoparticles under an oscillating magnetic field. Reprinted with permission from Zonghuan L, Malcolm PD, Zhanhu G, et al. Magnestic switch of permeability for polyelectrolyte microcapsules embedded with nanoparticles. Langmuir. 2005;21:2042–2050. Copyright © 2005. American Chemical Society.109Abbreviations: Co@Au, ferromagnetic gold-coated cobalt; FITC, fluorescein isothiocyanate; MnCO3, manganese carbonate.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4061173&req=5

f6-ijn-9-2863: Layer-by-layer self-assembly and permeability test for microcapsules embedded with ferromagnetic gold-coated cobalt nanoparticles under an oscillating magnetic field. Reprinted with permission from Zonghuan L, Malcolm PD, Zhanhu G, et al. Magnestic switch of permeability for polyelectrolyte microcapsules embedded with nanoparticles. Langmuir. 2005;21:2042–2050. Copyright © 2005. American Chemical Society.109Abbreviations: Co@Au, ferromagnetic gold-coated cobalt; FITC, fluorescein isothiocyanate; MnCO3, manganese carbonate.
Mentions: More recently, implantable microchips have been developed on the basis of MNPs, such as a novel drug-delivery chip for magnetically-controlled release of anti-epileptic drugs95,96 (Figure 6). The chip was made of an electrically-conductive flexible polyethylene terephthalate substrate that contained drug-loaded magnetic SPION-core-silica-shell nanoparticles.

Bottom Line: Despite recent advances, survival of GBM patients remains poor.Major challenges in GBM treatment are drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier, restriction of damage to healthy brain tissues, and limitation of resistance to therapies.Third, it discusses different methodologies for synthesis of each inorganic agent.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA ; Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Hypertension, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and most aggressive malignant primary brain tumor in humans. Current GBM treatment includes surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy, sometimes supplemented with novel therapies. Despite recent advances, survival of GBM patients remains poor. Major challenges in GBM treatment are drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier, restriction of damage to healthy brain tissues, and limitation of resistance to therapies. This article reviews recent advances in the application of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), gold nanorods (GNRs), and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for hyperthermia ablation of GBM. First, the article introduces GBM, its current treatment, and hyperthermia as a potential modality for the management of GBM. Second, it introduces MNPs, GNRs, and CNTs as inorganic agents to induce hyperthermia in GBM. Third, it discusses different methodologies for synthesis of each inorganic agent. Finally, it reviews in vitro and in vivo studies in which MNPs, GNRs, and CNTs have been applied for hyperthermia ablation and drug delivery in GBM.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus