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Sugar-sweetened beverage intake and cancer recurrence and survival in CALGB 89803 (Alliance).

Fuchs MA, Sato K, Niedzwiecki D, Ye X, Saltz LB, Mayer RJ, Mowat RB, Whittom R, Hantel A, Benson A, Atienza D, Messino M, Kindler H, Venook A, Ogino S, Wu K, Willett WC, Giovannucci EL, Meyerhardt JA - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: High sugar-sweetened beverage intake has been associated with obesity, diabetes, and cardio-metabolic diseases, but the influence on colon cancer survival is unknown.The association of sugar-sweetened beverages on cancer recurrence or mortality appeared greater among patients who were both overweight (body mass index ≥ 2 5 kg/m(2)) and less physically active (metabolic equivalent task-hours per week <18) (HR = 2.22; 95% CI, 1.29-3.81, P(trend) = 0.0025).Higher sugar-sweetened beverage intake was associated with a significantly increased risk of cancer recurrence and mortality in stage III colon cancer patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, United States of America.

ABSTRACT

Background: In colon cancer patients, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, and high dietary glycemic load have been associated with increased risk of cancer recurrence. High sugar-sweetened beverage intake has been associated with obesity, diabetes, and cardio-metabolic diseases, but the influence on colon cancer survival is unknown.

Methods: We assessed the association between sugar-sweetened beverage consumption on cancer recurrence and mortality in 1,011 stage III colon cancer patients who completed food frequency questionnaires as part of a U.S. National Cancer Institute-sponsored adjuvant chemotherapy trial. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated with Cox proportional hazard models.

Results: Patients consuming ≥ 2 servings of sugar-sweetened beverages per day experienced an adjusted HR for disease recurrence or mortality of 1.67 (95% CI, 1.04-2.68), compared with those consuming <2 servings per month (P(trend) = 0.02). The association of sugar-sweetened beverages on cancer recurrence or mortality appeared greater among patients who were both overweight (body mass index ≥ 2 5 kg/m(2)) and less physically active (metabolic equivalent task-hours per week <18) (HR = 2.22; 95% CI, 1.29-3.81, P(trend) = 0.0025).

Conclusion: Higher sugar-sweetened beverage intake was associated with a significantly increased risk of cancer recurrence and mortality in stage III colon cancer patients.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Multivariate hazard ratios for cancer recurrence or death according to combinations of body mass index, physical activity, and sugar-sweetened beverage intake (3 categories).BMI = body mass index in kg/m2; PA = physical activity in MET-hours per week; wk = week, d = day. Intermediate = BMI≥25 kg/m2 and PA≥18 MET-hours per week or BMI<25 kg/m2 and PA<18 MET-hours per week.
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pone-0099816-g003: Multivariate hazard ratios for cancer recurrence or death according to combinations of body mass index, physical activity, and sugar-sweetened beverage intake (3 categories).BMI = body mass index in kg/m2; PA = physical activity in MET-hours per week; wk = week, d = day. Intermediate = BMI≥25 kg/m2 and PA≥18 MET-hours per week or BMI<25 kg/m2 and PA<18 MET-hours per week.

Mentions: We further explored whether the association between sugar-sweetened beverage intake and the risk for cancer recurrence or mortality was more pronounced among patients who were both overweight (BMI≥25 kg/m2) and less physically active (<18 MET-hours/week) (Figure 3). Among patients who were both overweight and less active (n = 541), the adjusted HR for cancer recurrence or mortality was 2.22 (95% CI, 1.29–3.81) when comparing the highest and the lowest categories of sugar-sweetened beverage intake (Ptrend = 0.0025). In contrast, among the 84 patients who were both normal weight (<25 kg/m2) and physically active (MET-hours per week ≥18), sugar-sweetened beverage intake did not significantly influence the risk of cancer recurrence or mortality (Ptrend = 0.67). A test for statistical interaction between sugar-sweetened beverage intake and the combined assessment of BMI and physical activity was, however, not significant (Pinteraction = 0.40).


Sugar-sweetened beverage intake and cancer recurrence and survival in CALGB 89803 (Alliance).

Fuchs MA, Sato K, Niedzwiecki D, Ye X, Saltz LB, Mayer RJ, Mowat RB, Whittom R, Hantel A, Benson A, Atienza D, Messino M, Kindler H, Venook A, Ogino S, Wu K, Willett WC, Giovannucci EL, Meyerhardt JA - PLoS ONE (2014)

Multivariate hazard ratios for cancer recurrence or death according to combinations of body mass index, physical activity, and sugar-sweetened beverage intake (3 categories).BMI = body mass index in kg/m2; PA = physical activity in MET-hours per week; wk = week, d = day. Intermediate = BMI≥25 kg/m2 and PA≥18 MET-hours per week or BMI<25 kg/m2 and PA<18 MET-hours per week.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4061031&req=5

pone-0099816-g003: Multivariate hazard ratios for cancer recurrence or death according to combinations of body mass index, physical activity, and sugar-sweetened beverage intake (3 categories).BMI = body mass index in kg/m2; PA = physical activity in MET-hours per week; wk = week, d = day. Intermediate = BMI≥25 kg/m2 and PA≥18 MET-hours per week or BMI<25 kg/m2 and PA<18 MET-hours per week.
Mentions: We further explored whether the association between sugar-sweetened beverage intake and the risk for cancer recurrence or mortality was more pronounced among patients who were both overweight (BMI≥25 kg/m2) and less physically active (<18 MET-hours/week) (Figure 3). Among patients who were both overweight and less active (n = 541), the adjusted HR for cancer recurrence or mortality was 2.22 (95% CI, 1.29–3.81) when comparing the highest and the lowest categories of sugar-sweetened beverage intake (Ptrend = 0.0025). In contrast, among the 84 patients who were both normal weight (<25 kg/m2) and physically active (MET-hours per week ≥18), sugar-sweetened beverage intake did not significantly influence the risk of cancer recurrence or mortality (Ptrend = 0.67). A test for statistical interaction between sugar-sweetened beverage intake and the combined assessment of BMI and physical activity was, however, not significant (Pinteraction = 0.40).

Bottom Line: High sugar-sweetened beverage intake has been associated with obesity, diabetes, and cardio-metabolic diseases, but the influence on colon cancer survival is unknown.The association of sugar-sweetened beverages on cancer recurrence or mortality appeared greater among patients who were both overweight (body mass index ≥ 2 5 kg/m(2)) and less physically active (metabolic equivalent task-hours per week <18) (HR = 2.22; 95% CI, 1.29-3.81, P(trend) = 0.0025).Higher sugar-sweetened beverage intake was associated with a significantly increased risk of cancer recurrence and mortality in stage III colon cancer patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, United States of America.

ABSTRACT

Background: In colon cancer patients, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, and high dietary glycemic load have been associated with increased risk of cancer recurrence. High sugar-sweetened beverage intake has been associated with obesity, diabetes, and cardio-metabolic diseases, but the influence on colon cancer survival is unknown.

Methods: We assessed the association between sugar-sweetened beverage consumption on cancer recurrence and mortality in 1,011 stage III colon cancer patients who completed food frequency questionnaires as part of a U.S. National Cancer Institute-sponsored adjuvant chemotherapy trial. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated with Cox proportional hazard models.

Results: Patients consuming ≥ 2 servings of sugar-sweetened beverages per day experienced an adjusted HR for disease recurrence or mortality of 1.67 (95% CI, 1.04-2.68), compared with those consuming <2 servings per month (P(trend) = 0.02). The association of sugar-sweetened beverages on cancer recurrence or mortality appeared greater among patients who were both overweight (body mass index ≥ 2 5 kg/m(2)) and less physically active (metabolic equivalent task-hours per week <18) (HR = 2.22; 95% CI, 1.29-3.81, P(trend) = 0.0025).

Conclusion: Higher sugar-sweetened beverage intake was associated with a significantly increased risk of cancer recurrence and mortality in stage III colon cancer patients.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus