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Paradoxical exploitation of protected fishes as bait for anglers: evaluating the Lamprey bait market in Europe and developing sustainable and ethical solutions.

Foulds WL, Lucas MC - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Although annual catches in the main English lamprey fishery (River Ouse) have varied widely since 1995, catch per unit effort did not decline between 2000 and 2012.This facilitates opportunities to enter into dialogue with anglers over alternative baits to threatened lamprey.The study emphasises the need to inform stakeholders about conservation species subjected to market-driven exploitation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Durham University, Durham, County Durham, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
A reoccurring conservation problem is the resolution of consumptive use of threatened wildlife and is especially difficult to defend when it occurs for recreational practices. We explored the commercial capture and supply of threatened European river lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) to anglers, to determine the extent of exploitation and seek opportunities for improved conservation. The trade began in 1995 from England, but by 2012 involved sale of lamprey from England, The Netherlands and Estonia, including from protected populations. Lamprey are sold frozen for the capture of predatory fish, mostly in freshwater. In the year 2011/2012 9 tonnes (>90,000 lampreys) of river lamprey were supplied, almost exclusively to British anglers. Although annual catches in the main English lamprey fishery (River Ouse) have varied widely since 1995, catch per unit effort did not decline between 2000 and 2012. Conservation actions since 2011 have included a cap on fishing licenses, catch quotas and restricted fishing seasons. Now, 86% of lamprey bait is imported to Britain. Most bait sellers interviewed would not stock lamprey if they knew they were from threatened populations; many felt their trade would not be impacted if lamprey were not stocked. This facilitates opportunities to enter into dialogue with anglers over alternative baits to threatened lamprey. The study emphasises the need to inform stakeholders about conservation species subjected to market-driven exploitation.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

The total catches of river lamprey (in kg) by Fisher A (dotted) and B (solid) for seasons 1995–2008 (lamprey caught as by-catch in licenced eel fishery) and seasons 2011–2012 (lamprey caught in an authorised lamprey fishery with temporal and allowable catch restrictions) in the tidal River Ouse, Humber River Basin, NE England.
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pone-0099617-g001: The total catches of river lamprey (in kg) by Fisher A (dotted) and B (solid) for seasons 1995–2008 (lamprey caught as by-catch in licenced eel fishery) and seasons 2011–2012 (lamprey caught in an authorised lamprey fishery with temporal and allowable catch restrictions) in the tidal River Ouse, Humber River Basin, NE England.

Mentions: Before fishing restrictions in 2011, catch data from 2000–2008 indicate that Ouse lamprey were fished from as early as 9th September (2006 season, Fisher A) up to 21st February (2000 season, Fisher A), and the number of traps and days fished varied between seasons. Before 2011, total catch (kg) of river lamprey caught by Fisher A varied moderately between fishing seasons (1995–2008), ranging from 834.2 kg in 2005 (equivalent to ∼8 243 lamprey) to 2 810.5 kg (∼30 998 lamprey) in 2003 (Fig. 1). Mean seasonal total catch (kg) for Fisher A for seasons 1995–2008 was 1 841.5±625.8 kg (± SD), equivalent to ∼18 197±6 184 lamprey. Before 2011, total catch (kg) of river lamprey caught by Fisher B ranged from 904.5 kg (∼8 937 lamprey) in 2005, 8.4% more than Fisher A’s total catch for 2005, to 1 764.9 kg (∼17 443 lamprey) in 2004, 25.9% less than Fisher A’s total catch for 2004 (Fig. 1). Thus, mean seasonal total catch (kg) for Fisher B for 2004 and 2005 was 1 334.7±608.4 kg (± SD), equivalent to ∼13 189±6 012 lamprey. The total catch (kg) of lamprey by both fishers varied little in 2011 and 2012 when fishing restrictions were imposed (Fig. 1).


Paradoxical exploitation of protected fishes as bait for anglers: evaluating the Lamprey bait market in Europe and developing sustainable and ethical solutions.

Foulds WL, Lucas MC - PLoS ONE (2014)

The total catches of river lamprey (in kg) by Fisher A (dotted) and B (solid) for seasons 1995–2008 (lamprey caught as by-catch in licenced eel fishery) and seasons 2011–2012 (lamprey caught in an authorised lamprey fishery with temporal and allowable catch restrictions) in the tidal River Ouse, Humber River Basin, NE England.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4061017&req=5

pone-0099617-g001: The total catches of river lamprey (in kg) by Fisher A (dotted) and B (solid) for seasons 1995–2008 (lamprey caught as by-catch in licenced eel fishery) and seasons 2011–2012 (lamprey caught in an authorised lamprey fishery with temporal and allowable catch restrictions) in the tidal River Ouse, Humber River Basin, NE England.
Mentions: Before fishing restrictions in 2011, catch data from 2000–2008 indicate that Ouse lamprey were fished from as early as 9th September (2006 season, Fisher A) up to 21st February (2000 season, Fisher A), and the number of traps and days fished varied between seasons. Before 2011, total catch (kg) of river lamprey caught by Fisher A varied moderately between fishing seasons (1995–2008), ranging from 834.2 kg in 2005 (equivalent to ∼8 243 lamprey) to 2 810.5 kg (∼30 998 lamprey) in 2003 (Fig. 1). Mean seasonal total catch (kg) for Fisher A for seasons 1995–2008 was 1 841.5±625.8 kg (± SD), equivalent to ∼18 197±6 184 lamprey. Before 2011, total catch (kg) of river lamprey caught by Fisher B ranged from 904.5 kg (∼8 937 lamprey) in 2005, 8.4% more than Fisher A’s total catch for 2005, to 1 764.9 kg (∼17 443 lamprey) in 2004, 25.9% less than Fisher A’s total catch for 2004 (Fig. 1). Thus, mean seasonal total catch (kg) for Fisher B for 2004 and 2005 was 1 334.7±608.4 kg (± SD), equivalent to ∼13 189±6 012 lamprey. The total catch (kg) of lamprey by both fishers varied little in 2011 and 2012 when fishing restrictions were imposed (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: Although annual catches in the main English lamprey fishery (River Ouse) have varied widely since 1995, catch per unit effort did not decline between 2000 and 2012.This facilitates opportunities to enter into dialogue with anglers over alternative baits to threatened lamprey.The study emphasises the need to inform stakeholders about conservation species subjected to market-driven exploitation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Durham University, Durham, County Durham, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
A reoccurring conservation problem is the resolution of consumptive use of threatened wildlife and is especially difficult to defend when it occurs for recreational practices. We explored the commercial capture and supply of threatened European river lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) to anglers, to determine the extent of exploitation and seek opportunities for improved conservation. The trade began in 1995 from England, but by 2012 involved sale of lamprey from England, The Netherlands and Estonia, including from protected populations. Lamprey are sold frozen for the capture of predatory fish, mostly in freshwater. In the year 2011/2012 9 tonnes (>90,000 lampreys) of river lamprey were supplied, almost exclusively to British anglers. Although annual catches in the main English lamprey fishery (River Ouse) have varied widely since 1995, catch per unit effort did not decline between 2000 and 2012. Conservation actions since 2011 have included a cap on fishing licenses, catch quotas and restricted fishing seasons. Now, 86% of lamprey bait is imported to Britain. Most bait sellers interviewed would not stock lamprey if they knew they were from threatened populations; many felt their trade would not be impacted if lamprey were not stocked. This facilitates opportunities to enter into dialogue with anglers over alternative baits to threatened lamprey. The study emphasises the need to inform stakeholders about conservation species subjected to market-driven exploitation.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus