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Pediatric oncology as the next global child health priority: the need for national childhood cancer strategies in low- and middle-income countries.

Gupta S, Rivera-Luna R, Ribeiro RC, Howard SC - PLoS Med. (2014)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Paediatric Haematology/Oncology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

ABSTRACT

As is already the case in high-income countries, cancer represents the leading cause of non-accidental death among children in a growing number of middle-income countries

Meaningful declines in global childhood cancer mortality will require moving beyond the current situation through the establishment of national childhood cancer strategies

Key components of such strategies include financial coverage, accreditation of childhood cancer centers, mandatory childhood cancer reporting and registration, development of national standards of care, and the creation of national childhood cancer governing bodies

Challenges to implementing such strategies include a paucity of implementation research, formal policy evaluation, and costing data

The ideal structure of such strategies in low-income countries is currently unknown, given severe resource constraints, deficits in infrastructure, and competing health needs

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Funding sources of the Unidad Nacional de Oncologia Pediátrica of Guatemala.The red area indicates funding from St. Jude Children's Research Hospital and the blue area funding from all other sources. An initial outlay of funds from St. Jude was subsequently leveraged into additional resources from both government and private donors. The creation of an independent fundraising organization (Fundación Ayúdame a Vivir, http://ayuvi.org.gt) was essential to this outcome. Similar successes may be possible in other settings; the role and best use of seed funding from HIC centers requires further investigation.
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pmed-1001656-g001: Funding sources of the Unidad Nacional de Oncologia Pediátrica of Guatemala.The red area indicates funding from St. Jude Children's Research Hospital and the blue area funding from all other sources. An initial outlay of funds from St. Jude was subsequently leveraged into additional resources from both government and private donors. The creation of an independent fundraising organization (Fundación Ayúdame a Vivir, http://ayuvi.org.gt) was essential to this outcome. Similar successes may be possible in other settings; the role and best use of seed funding from HIC centers requires further investigation.

Mentions: Second, the cost of implementing such policies has not been described. While childhood cancer treatment is likely to be highly cost-effective given the large number of potential years of life saved [12], rigorous costing studies are required to better inform health policymakers. It is worth noting that pediatric oncology may represent a unique funding model in its ability to attract private resources that would otherwise have remained outside the health sector. For example, in Guatemala an initial outlay of funds from an HIC twinning partner was subsequently leveraged into additional resources from both government and private donors (Figure 1). Similar success may be possible in other settings.


Pediatric oncology as the next global child health priority: the need for national childhood cancer strategies in low- and middle-income countries.

Gupta S, Rivera-Luna R, Ribeiro RC, Howard SC - PLoS Med. (2014)

Funding sources of the Unidad Nacional de Oncologia Pediátrica of Guatemala.The red area indicates funding from St. Jude Children's Research Hospital and the blue area funding from all other sources. An initial outlay of funds from St. Jude was subsequently leveraged into additional resources from both government and private donors. The creation of an independent fundraising organization (Fundación Ayúdame a Vivir, http://ayuvi.org.gt) was essential to this outcome. Similar successes may be possible in other settings; the role and best use of seed funding from HIC centers requires further investigation.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4061014&req=5

pmed-1001656-g001: Funding sources of the Unidad Nacional de Oncologia Pediátrica of Guatemala.The red area indicates funding from St. Jude Children's Research Hospital and the blue area funding from all other sources. An initial outlay of funds from St. Jude was subsequently leveraged into additional resources from both government and private donors. The creation of an independent fundraising organization (Fundación Ayúdame a Vivir, http://ayuvi.org.gt) was essential to this outcome. Similar successes may be possible in other settings; the role and best use of seed funding from HIC centers requires further investigation.
Mentions: Second, the cost of implementing such policies has not been described. While childhood cancer treatment is likely to be highly cost-effective given the large number of potential years of life saved [12], rigorous costing studies are required to better inform health policymakers. It is worth noting that pediatric oncology may represent a unique funding model in its ability to attract private resources that would otherwise have remained outside the health sector. For example, in Guatemala an initial outlay of funds from an HIC twinning partner was subsequently leveraged into additional resources from both government and private donors (Figure 1). Similar success may be possible in other settings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Paediatric Haematology/Oncology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

ABSTRACT

As is already the case in high-income countries, cancer represents the leading cause of non-accidental death among children in a growing number of middle-income countries

Meaningful declines in global childhood cancer mortality will require moving beyond the current situation through the establishment of national childhood cancer strategies

Key components of such strategies include financial coverage, accreditation of childhood cancer centers, mandatory childhood cancer reporting and registration, development of national standards of care, and the creation of national childhood cancer governing bodies

Challenges to implementing such strategies include a paucity of implementation research, formal policy evaluation, and costing data

The ideal structure of such strategies in low-income countries is currently unknown, given severe resource constraints, deficits in infrastructure, and competing health needs

Show MeSH