Limits...
Assessing the impact of human activities on British Columbia's estuaries.

Robb CK - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: The world's marine and coastal ecosystems are under threat and single-sector management efforts have failed to address those threats.Using statistical analyses, estuaries were assigned to groups facing related threats that could benefit from similar management.The results show that estuaries in the most populated marine ecosections have the highest biological importance but also the highest impacts and the lowest levels of protection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Environment and Management, Royal Roads University, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.

ABSTRACT
The world's marine and coastal ecosystems are under threat and single-sector management efforts have failed to address those threats. Scientific consensus suggests that management should evolve to focus on ecosystems and their human, ecological, and physical components. Estuaries are recognized globally as one of the world's most productive and most threatened ecosystems and many estuarine areas in British Columbia (BC) have been lost or degraded. To help prioritize activities and areas for regional management efforts, spatial information on human activities that adversely affect BC's estuaries was compiled. Using statistical analyses, estuaries were assigned to groups facing related threats that could benefit from similar management. The results show that estuaries in the most populated marine ecosections have the highest biological importance but also the highest impacts and the lowest levels of protection. This research is timely, as it will inform ongoing marine planning, land acquisition, and stewardship efforts in BC.

Show MeSH
Distribution of K-medians cluster results.Description: Estuary-watershed systems are shown distributed into clusters that resulted from the K-medians cluster analysis based on the presence of 16 threat variables. Similar to the count of threats, the clusters highlight a north-south gradient, with highly threatened estuaries primarily observed in the south coast ecosections and minimally threatened estuaries predominantly observed in the north coast ecosections.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4061013&req=5

pone-0099578-g003: Distribution of K-medians cluster results.Description: Estuary-watershed systems are shown distributed into clusters that resulted from the K-medians cluster analysis based on the presence of 16 threat variables. Similar to the count of threats, the clusters highlight a north-south gradient, with highly threatened estuaries primarily observed in the south coast ecosections and minimally threatened estuaries predominantly observed in the north coast ecosections.

Mentions: The cluster analysis revealed three optimal clusters (Figure 3). Cluster 3, representing estuaries with the greatest importance for waterbirds and carbon sequestration (Table 4), was the cluster with the greatest impact from most of the threat variables (Table 3). These 69 estuaries were found primarily in the south coast ecosections, dominated by the Strait of Georgia ecosection. Cluster 3 had the greatest average number of protected areas within each estuary, but the smallest average proportion of area protected. Cluster 2 represented 127 estuaries moderately affected by most threat variables and the highest impact from forestry and recreational fishing. The majority of estuaries in this cluster were found on the south coast in the less populated Vancouver Island Shelf ecosection. Cluster 1 faced minimal impacts from most threats but had a higher than average future change in precipitation. Cluster 1 also had the most estuaries, located predominantly within the North Coast Fjords ecosection. Based on average area conserved, these estuaries were also the most protected.


Assessing the impact of human activities on British Columbia's estuaries.

Robb CK - PLoS ONE (2014)

Distribution of K-medians cluster results.Description: Estuary-watershed systems are shown distributed into clusters that resulted from the K-medians cluster analysis based on the presence of 16 threat variables. Similar to the count of threats, the clusters highlight a north-south gradient, with highly threatened estuaries primarily observed in the south coast ecosections and minimally threatened estuaries predominantly observed in the north coast ecosections.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4061013&req=5

pone-0099578-g003: Distribution of K-medians cluster results.Description: Estuary-watershed systems are shown distributed into clusters that resulted from the K-medians cluster analysis based on the presence of 16 threat variables. Similar to the count of threats, the clusters highlight a north-south gradient, with highly threatened estuaries primarily observed in the south coast ecosections and minimally threatened estuaries predominantly observed in the north coast ecosections.
Mentions: The cluster analysis revealed three optimal clusters (Figure 3). Cluster 3, representing estuaries with the greatest importance for waterbirds and carbon sequestration (Table 4), was the cluster with the greatest impact from most of the threat variables (Table 3). These 69 estuaries were found primarily in the south coast ecosections, dominated by the Strait of Georgia ecosection. Cluster 3 had the greatest average number of protected areas within each estuary, but the smallest average proportion of area protected. Cluster 2 represented 127 estuaries moderately affected by most threat variables and the highest impact from forestry and recreational fishing. The majority of estuaries in this cluster were found on the south coast in the less populated Vancouver Island Shelf ecosection. Cluster 1 faced minimal impacts from most threats but had a higher than average future change in precipitation. Cluster 1 also had the most estuaries, located predominantly within the North Coast Fjords ecosection. Based on average area conserved, these estuaries were also the most protected.

Bottom Line: The world's marine and coastal ecosystems are under threat and single-sector management efforts have failed to address those threats.Using statistical analyses, estuaries were assigned to groups facing related threats that could benefit from similar management.The results show that estuaries in the most populated marine ecosections have the highest biological importance but also the highest impacts and the lowest levels of protection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Environment and Management, Royal Roads University, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.

ABSTRACT
The world's marine and coastal ecosystems are under threat and single-sector management efforts have failed to address those threats. Scientific consensus suggests that management should evolve to focus on ecosystems and their human, ecological, and physical components. Estuaries are recognized globally as one of the world's most productive and most threatened ecosystems and many estuarine areas in British Columbia (BC) have been lost or degraded. To help prioritize activities and areas for regional management efforts, spatial information on human activities that adversely affect BC's estuaries was compiled. Using statistical analyses, estuaries were assigned to groups facing related threats that could benefit from similar management. The results show that estuaries in the most populated marine ecosections have the highest biological importance but also the highest impacts and the lowest levels of protection. This research is timely, as it will inform ongoing marine planning, land acquisition, and stewardship efforts in BC.

Show MeSH