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Seroprevalence of HBV, HCV & HIV co-infection and risk factors analysis in Tripoli-Libya.

Daw MA, Shabash A, El-Bouzedi A, Dau AA, Association with the Libyan Study Group of Hepatitis & H - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: HBV was more prevalent among those aged over 50 years and was associated with family history.High prevalence was associated with geographic, ethnic and socioeconomic variability within the community.Regulations and health care education need to be implemented and longer term follow-up should be planned.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Tripoli, Libya; Department of Surgery, Tripoli Medical Centre, Faculty of Medicine, Tripoli, Libya.

ABSTRACT

Background: In 1998 Libya experienced a major outbreak of multiple blood borne viral hepatitis and HIV infections. Since then, no studies have been done on the epidemic features and risk factors of HBV, HCV, HIV and co-infection among the general population.

Methods: A prospective study was carried out using a multi-centre clustering method to collect samples from the general population. The participants were interviewed, and relevant information was collected, including socio-demographic, ethnic, and geographic variables. This information was correlated with the risk factors involved in the transmission of HBV, HCV and HIV. Blood samples were collected and the sera were tested for HBsAg, anti-HCV and anti-HIV using enzyme immunoassay.

Results: A total of 9,170 participants from the nine districts of Tripoli were enrolled. The average prevalence of HBsAg was 3.7%, anti-HCV 0.9%, anti-HIV 0.15% and co-infection 0.02%. The prevalence varied from one district to another. HBV was more prevalent among those aged over 50 years and was associated with family history. Anti-HCV and anti-HIV were more prevalent among those aged 20-40 years. Intravenous drug use and blood transfusion were the main risk factors for HCV and HIV infection.

Conclusion: HBV, HCV, HIV and co-infection are relatively common in Libya. High prevalence was associated with geographic, ethnic and socioeconomic variability within the community. HCV and HIV infections among the younger age groups are becoming an alarming issue. Regulations and health care education need to be implemented and longer term follow-up should be planned.

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Prevalence of hepatitis B, C and HIV infections by age, Tripoli -Libya 2011.
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pone-0098793-g002: Prevalence of hepatitis B, C and HIV infections by age, Tripoli -Libya 2011.

Mentions: The correlation of age with the prevalence of HBV, HCV and HIV is shown in figure 2. The age group most infected with HBV was 18–29 years old. The prevalence of HBsAg was lowest in the youngest age group (0.9%) while in the older groups it fluctuated between 2.0% and 2.9% without any evident temporal pattern. However, it rose sharply after the age of 50 years. The mean age of HBsAg-positive individuals was 36±16.8 years among females and 39±19.8 among males.


Seroprevalence of HBV, HCV & HIV co-infection and risk factors analysis in Tripoli-Libya.

Daw MA, Shabash A, El-Bouzedi A, Dau AA, Association with the Libyan Study Group of Hepatitis & H - PLoS ONE (2014)

Prevalence of hepatitis B, C and HIV infections by age, Tripoli -Libya 2011.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4060988&req=5

pone-0098793-g002: Prevalence of hepatitis B, C and HIV infections by age, Tripoli -Libya 2011.
Mentions: The correlation of age with the prevalence of HBV, HCV and HIV is shown in figure 2. The age group most infected with HBV was 18–29 years old. The prevalence of HBsAg was lowest in the youngest age group (0.9%) while in the older groups it fluctuated between 2.0% and 2.9% without any evident temporal pattern. However, it rose sharply after the age of 50 years. The mean age of HBsAg-positive individuals was 36±16.8 years among females and 39±19.8 among males.

Bottom Line: HBV was more prevalent among those aged over 50 years and was associated with family history.High prevalence was associated with geographic, ethnic and socioeconomic variability within the community.Regulations and health care education need to be implemented and longer term follow-up should be planned.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Tripoli, Libya; Department of Surgery, Tripoli Medical Centre, Faculty of Medicine, Tripoli, Libya.

ABSTRACT

Background: In 1998 Libya experienced a major outbreak of multiple blood borne viral hepatitis and HIV infections. Since then, no studies have been done on the epidemic features and risk factors of HBV, HCV, HIV and co-infection among the general population.

Methods: A prospective study was carried out using a multi-centre clustering method to collect samples from the general population. The participants were interviewed, and relevant information was collected, including socio-demographic, ethnic, and geographic variables. This information was correlated with the risk factors involved in the transmission of HBV, HCV and HIV. Blood samples were collected and the sera were tested for HBsAg, anti-HCV and anti-HIV using enzyme immunoassay.

Results: A total of 9,170 participants from the nine districts of Tripoli were enrolled. The average prevalence of HBsAg was 3.7%, anti-HCV 0.9%, anti-HIV 0.15% and co-infection 0.02%. The prevalence varied from one district to another. HBV was more prevalent among those aged over 50 years and was associated with family history. Anti-HCV and anti-HIV were more prevalent among those aged 20-40 years. Intravenous drug use and blood transfusion were the main risk factors for HCV and HIV infection.

Conclusion: HBV, HCV, HIV and co-infection are relatively common in Libya. High prevalence was associated with geographic, ethnic and socioeconomic variability within the community. HCV and HIV infections among the younger age groups are becoming an alarming issue. Regulations and health care education need to be implemented and longer term follow-up should be planned.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus