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A Pilot Study of Clinical Measures to Assess Mind-Body Intervention Effects for those with and without PTSD.

H W, Bs O - Altern Integr Med (2013)

Bottom Line: Physiological measures were assessed at baseline, during relaxation and stress conditions.The PTSD group had increased PTSD and depression severity, anxiety, and mood disturbance, and decreased quality of life scores.Respiration, heart rate variability, heart rate, and blood pressure differed significantly between conditions but not between groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Assess measures for future mind-body interventions in those with and without PTSD.

Methods: Psychological and immune measures were assessed at baseline in three age and gender-matched groups: 1) 15 combat veterans with PTSD, 2) 15 combat veterans without PTSD, and 3) 15 non-combat veterans without PTSD. Physiological measures were assessed at baseline, during relaxation and stress conditions.

Results: The PTSD group had increased PTSD and depression severity, anxiety, and mood disturbance, and decreased quality of life scores. Respiration, heart rate variability, heart rate, and blood pressure differed significantly between conditions but not between groups.

Conclusions: Respiration and heart rate variability may be useful measures for future mind-body intervention trials.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Respiration and HRV across all conditions: Respiration (bpm) and HRV(normal-normal inter-beat variance for each condition) are shown with standarderrors of the mean at each point. Note the expected increased variability in HRVwith slow deep breathing during Relaxation1 and Relaxation2.
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Figure 2: Respiration and HRV across all conditions: Respiration (bpm) and HRV(normal-normal inter-beat variance for each condition) are shown with standarderrors of the mean at each point. Note the expected increased variability in HRVwith slow deep breathing during Relaxation1 and Relaxation2.

Mentions: At baseline and within conditions, there were no group differences inrespiration, BP, HRV, or heart rate (ps>0.05) (Table 3). The main effect of condition wassignificant for respiration (F(6,41)=39.4,p<0.0005), HRV, heart rate, and systolic anddiastolic BP. Extra period before (Figure2). Also, the effect of Condition was different for HRV in modelsincluding all conditions (F(6,43)=12.8,p<0.0005). Further analyses co-varying forrespiration rate, age, and medications remained significant. Heart rateincreased from baseline during the relaxation conditions and remaining unchangedduring the stress condition (F(6,43)=14.8,p<0.0005). Systolic BP decreased during therelaxation conditions and remained the same for the stress condition (relativeto the previous baseline) (F(6,41)=6.6,p<0.0005) (Table4). Diastolic BP increased during Relaxation and decreased duringStress (relative to the previous baseline)(F(6,43)=3.8, p=0.004).


A Pilot Study of Clinical Measures to Assess Mind-Body Intervention Effects for those with and without PTSD.

H W, Bs O - Altern Integr Med (2013)

Respiration and HRV across all conditions: Respiration (bpm) and HRV(normal-normal inter-beat variance for each condition) are shown with standarderrors of the mean at each point. Note the expected increased variability in HRVwith slow deep breathing during Relaxation1 and Relaxation2.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4060973&req=5

Figure 2: Respiration and HRV across all conditions: Respiration (bpm) and HRV(normal-normal inter-beat variance for each condition) are shown with standarderrors of the mean at each point. Note the expected increased variability in HRVwith slow deep breathing during Relaxation1 and Relaxation2.
Mentions: At baseline and within conditions, there were no group differences inrespiration, BP, HRV, or heart rate (ps>0.05) (Table 3). The main effect of condition wassignificant for respiration (F(6,41)=39.4,p<0.0005), HRV, heart rate, and systolic anddiastolic BP. Extra period before (Figure2). Also, the effect of Condition was different for HRV in modelsincluding all conditions (F(6,43)=12.8,p<0.0005). Further analyses co-varying forrespiration rate, age, and medications remained significant. Heart rateincreased from baseline during the relaxation conditions and remaining unchangedduring the stress condition (F(6,43)=14.8,p<0.0005). Systolic BP decreased during therelaxation conditions and remained the same for the stress condition (relativeto the previous baseline) (F(6,41)=6.6,p<0.0005) (Table4). Diastolic BP increased during Relaxation and decreased duringStress (relative to the previous baseline)(F(6,43)=3.8, p=0.004).

Bottom Line: Physiological measures were assessed at baseline, during relaxation and stress conditions.The PTSD group had increased PTSD and depression severity, anxiety, and mood disturbance, and decreased quality of life scores.Respiration, heart rate variability, heart rate, and blood pressure differed significantly between conditions but not between groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Assess measures for future mind-body interventions in those with and without PTSD.

Methods: Psychological and immune measures were assessed at baseline in three age and gender-matched groups: 1) 15 combat veterans with PTSD, 2) 15 combat veterans without PTSD, and 3) 15 non-combat veterans without PTSD. Physiological measures were assessed at baseline, during relaxation and stress conditions.

Results: The PTSD group had increased PTSD and depression severity, anxiety, and mood disturbance, and decreased quality of life scores. Respiration, heart rate variability, heart rate, and blood pressure differed significantly between conditions but not between groups.

Conclusions: Respiration and heart rate variability may be useful measures for future mind-body intervention trials.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus