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Child with temporal lobe hamartoma: A to Z images and a case report.

Zuleta JL, Mezo RC, Ortega EP, Barrón BL, Espinosa RC, Marín Muentes DP, Cortázar JS, de Guadalupe Gómez Pérez M, Zuleta JA, Zuleta JA - Ecancermedicalscience (2014)

Bottom Line: Gelastic seizure was first described by Trousseau in 1877 and comes from the Greek word gelos (laughs), as laughter is the main feature [1].Normal laughter is a reactive emotional behaviour and motor action that involves the limbic system, hypothalamus, temporal cortex, and several regions of the brainstem.A female patient, six years old, left-handed, with gelastic seizures, uncontrolled despite being treated with two antiepileptic drugs at high doses, was treated.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Magnetic Resonance Department, Advanced Medical Image Centre, La Paz, Bolivia ; Magnetic Resonance Department, Hospital Ángeles del Pedregal, México, DF 10700, México.

ABSTRACT
Gelastic seizure was first described by Trousseau in 1877 and comes from the Greek word gelos (laughs), as laughter is the main feature [1]. Normal laughter is a reactive emotional behaviour and motor action that involves the limbic system, hypothalamus, temporal cortex, and several regions of the brainstem. A female patient, six years old, left-handed, with gelastic seizures, uncontrolled despite being treated with two antiepileptic drugs at high doses, was treated. A simple axial tomography was done, where a hypodense lesion that shapes the inner table of the skull temporal level was observed; later, magnetic resonance imaging was requested, better characterising an intraxial lesion in the right second temporal gyrus cystic appearance.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) SAGITTAL T1w MRI + contrast: temporal lesion (white arrow). (B) Transoperatory photography (50×) that shows cystic grey lesion and whitish edges. (C) Microscopic photograph (600×) US that shows uniform core astrocytes (70%) immersed in a fibrillar matrix, as well as compact nests of oligodendrocytes (30%) with clear perinuclear halos and a capillary mesh between them, compatible with hamartoma.
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figure5: (A) SAGITTAL T1w MRI + contrast: temporal lesion (white arrow). (B) Transoperatory photography (50×) that shows cystic grey lesion and whitish edges. (C) Microscopic photograph (600×) US that shows uniform core astrocytes (70%) immersed in a fibrillar matrix, as well as compact nests of oligodendrocytes (30%) with clear perinuclear halos and a capillary mesh between them, compatible with hamartoma.

Mentions: This lesion grew slowly (about 2 mm) in the last six months (see Figure 2); because of this, a PET was carried out (see Figure 3) to see the behaviour of the injury; there is no uptake of radiopharmaceutical (5-deoxy Fluoride glucose). Due to the fact that the seizures could not be controlled with medication alone and the increase in the lesion of 2 mm in diameter, a functional magnetic resonance blood-oxygen-level dependence (BOLD) was requested to determine the somato sensory and motor hemispheric dominance, as well as the DTI with 32 directions to define the degree of injury of the white matter tracts, in particular, the tract associated with the speech centre (see Figure 4). This systematic analysis allowed us to decide on the surgical treatment where the benign nature of this lesion is confirmed by histopathology (see Figure 5).


Child with temporal lobe hamartoma: A to Z images and a case report.

Zuleta JL, Mezo RC, Ortega EP, Barrón BL, Espinosa RC, Marín Muentes DP, Cortázar JS, de Guadalupe Gómez Pérez M, Zuleta JA, Zuleta JA - Ecancermedicalscience (2014)

(A) SAGITTAL T1w MRI + contrast: temporal lesion (white arrow). (B) Transoperatory photography (50×) that shows cystic grey lesion and whitish edges. (C) Microscopic photograph (600×) US that shows uniform core astrocytes (70%) immersed in a fibrillar matrix, as well as compact nests of oligodendrocytes (30%) with clear perinuclear halos and a capillary mesh between them, compatible with hamartoma.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4060958&req=5

figure5: (A) SAGITTAL T1w MRI + contrast: temporal lesion (white arrow). (B) Transoperatory photography (50×) that shows cystic grey lesion and whitish edges. (C) Microscopic photograph (600×) US that shows uniform core astrocytes (70%) immersed in a fibrillar matrix, as well as compact nests of oligodendrocytes (30%) with clear perinuclear halos and a capillary mesh between them, compatible with hamartoma.
Mentions: This lesion grew slowly (about 2 mm) in the last six months (see Figure 2); because of this, a PET was carried out (see Figure 3) to see the behaviour of the injury; there is no uptake of radiopharmaceutical (5-deoxy Fluoride glucose). Due to the fact that the seizures could not be controlled with medication alone and the increase in the lesion of 2 mm in diameter, a functional magnetic resonance blood-oxygen-level dependence (BOLD) was requested to determine the somato sensory and motor hemispheric dominance, as well as the DTI with 32 directions to define the degree of injury of the white matter tracts, in particular, the tract associated with the speech centre (see Figure 4). This systematic analysis allowed us to decide on the surgical treatment where the benign nature of this lesion is confirmed by histopathology (see Figure 5).

Bottom Line: Gelastic seizure was first described by Trousseau in 1877 and comes from the Greek word gelos (laughs), as laughter is the main feature [1].Normal laughter is a reactive emotional behaviour and motor action that involves the limbic system, hypothalamus, temporal cortex, and several regions of the brainstem.A female patient, six years old, left-handed, with gelastic seizures, uncontrolled despite being treated with two antiepileptic drugs at high doses, was treated.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Magnetic Resonance Department, Advanced Medical Image Centre, La Paz, Bolivia ; Magnetic Resonance Department, Hospital Ángeles del Pedregal, México, DF 10700, México.

ABSTRACT
Gelastic seizure was first described by Trousseau in 1877 and comes from the Greek word gelos (laughs), as laughter is the main feature [1]. Normal laughter is a reactive emotional behaviour and motor action that involves the limbic system, hypothalamus, temporal cortex, and several regions of the brainstem. A female patient, six years old, left-handed, with gelastic seizures, uncontrolled despite being treated with two antiepileptic drugs at high doses, was treated. A simple axial tomography was done, where a hypodense lesion that shapes the inner table of the skull temporal level was observed; later, magnetic resonance imaging was requested, better characterising an intraxial lesion in the right second temporal gyrus cystic appearance.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus