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Earthworm coelomocytes as nanoscavenger of ZnO NPs.

Gupta S, Kushwah T, Yadav S - Nanoscale Res Lett (2014)

Bottom Line: They 'absorb' the dissolved chemicals through their moist 'body wall' due to the interstitial water and also ingest by 'mouth' while soil passes through the gut.Since the advent of the nanotechnology era, the environmental sink has been continuously receiving engineered nanomaterials as well as their derivatives.Our current understanding of the potential impact of nanomaterials and their natural scavenger is limited.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Zoology, School of Biological Sciences, Dr H S Gour Central University, Sagar, MP 470003, India.

ABSTRACT
Earthworms can 'biotransform' or 'biodegrade' chemical contaminants, rendering them harmless in their bodies, and can bioaccumulate them in their tissues. They 'absorb' the dissolved chemicals through their moist 'body wall' due to the interstitial water and also ingest by 'mouth' while soil passes through the gut. Since the advent of the nanotechnology era, the environmental sink has been continuously receiving engineered nanomaterials as well as their derivatives. Our current understanding of the potential impact of nanomaterials and their natural scavenger is limited. In the present investigation, we studied the cellular uptake of ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) by coelomocytes especially by chloragocytes of Eisenia fetida and their role as nanoscavenger. Results from exposure to 100- and 50-nm ZnO NPs indicate that coelomocytes of the earthworm E. fetida show no significant DNA damage at a dose lower than 3 mg/l and have the potential ability to uptake ZnO NPs from the soil ecosystem and transform them into microparticles.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

DNA damage of coelomocytes (A) in the control and (B) after exposure to 100-nm NPs (3 mg/l).
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Figure 1: DNA damage of coelomocytes (A) in the control and (B) after exposure to 100-nm NPs (3 mg/l).

Mentions: The Comet assay was performed as described by Singh et al.[31]. Ethidium bromide-stained nuclei were examined with a fluorescent microscope (Leica Microsystems, Wetzlar, Germany). Images were analyzed with the software CASP according to the method of Collins et al.[32] (Figure 1).


Earthworm coelomocytes as nanoscavenger of ZnO NPs.

Gupta S, Kushwah T, Yadav S - Nanoscale Res Lett (2014)

DNA damage of coelomocytes (A) in the control and (B) after exposure to 100-nm NPs (3 mg/l).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4060845&req=5

Figure 1: DNA damage of coelomocytes (A) in the control and (B) after exposure to 100-nm NPs (3 mg/l).
Mentions: The Comet assay was performed as described by Singh et al.[31]. Ethidium bromide-stained nuclei were examined with a fluorescent microscope (Leica Microsystems, Wetzlar, Germany). Images were analyzed with the software CASP according to the method of Collins et al.[32] (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: They 'absorb' the dissolved chemicals through their moist 'body wall' due to the interstitial water and also ingest by 'mouth' while soil passes through the gut.Since the advent of the nanotechnology era, the environmental sink has been continuously receiving engineered nanomaterials as well as their derivatives.Our current understanding of the potential impact of nanomaterials and their natural scavenger is limited.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Zoology, School of Biological Sciences, Dr H S Gour Central University, Sagar, MP 470003, India.

ABSTRACT
Earthworms can 'biotransform' or 'biodegrade' chemical contaminants, rendering them harmless in their bodies, and can bioaccumulate them in their tissues. They 'absorb' the dissolved chemicals through their moist 'body wall' due to the interstitial water and also ingest by 'mouth' while soil passes through the gut. Since the advent of the nanotechnology era, the environmental sink has been continuously receiving engineered nanomaterials as well as their derivatives. Our current understanding of the potential impact of nanomaterials and their natural scavenger is limited. In the present investigation, we studied the cellular uptake of ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) by coelomocytes especially by chloragocytes of Eisenia fetida and their role as nanoscavenger. Results from exposure to 100- and 50-nm ZnO NPs indicate that coelomocytes of the earthworm E. fetida show no significant DNA damage at a dose lower than 3 mg/l and have the potential ability to uptake ZnO NPs from the soil ecosystem and transform them into microparticles.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus