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Simultaneous heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification by Chryseobacterium sp. R31 isolated from abattoir wastewater.

Kundu P, Pramanik A, Dasgupta A, Mukherjee S, Mukherjee J - Biomed Res Int (2014)

Bottom Line: From an initial COD value of 583.0 mg/L, 95.54% was removed whilst, from a starting NH4 (+)-N concentration of 55.7 mg/L, 95.87% was removed after 48 h contact.Molecular phylogenetic identification, supported by chemotaxonomic and physiological properties, assigned R31 as a close relative of Chryseobacterium haifense.This is the first report on concomitant carbon oxidation, nitrification, and denitrification in the genus Chryseobacterium and the associated kinetic coefficients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Civil Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032, India.

ABSTRACT
A heterotrophic carbon utilizing microbe (R31) capable of simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND) was isolated from wastewater of an Indian slaughterhouse. From an initial COD value of 583.0 mg/L, 95.54% was removed whilst, from a starting NH4 (+)-N concentration of 55.7 mg/L, 95.87% was removed after 48 h contact. The concentrations of the intermediates hydroxylamine, nitrite, and nitrate were low, thus ensuring nitrogen removal. Aerobic denitrification occurring during ammonium removal by R31 was confirmed by utilization of both nitrate and nitrite as nitrogen substrates. Glucose and succinate were superior while acetate and citrate were poor substrates for nitrogen removal. Molecular phylogenetic identification, supported by chemotaxonomic and physiological properties, assigned R31 as a close relative of Chryseobacterium haifense. The NH4 (+)-N utilization rate and growth of strain R31 were found to be higher at C/N = 10 in comparison to those achieved with C/N ratios of 5 and 20. Monod kinetic coefficients, half saturation concentration (K s ), maximum rate of substrate utilization (k), yield coefficient, (Y) and endogenous decay coefficient (K d ) indicated potential application of R31 in large-scale SND process. This is the first report on concomitant carbon oxidation, nitrification, and denitrification in the genus Chryseobacterium and the associated kinetic coefficients.

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(a) Influence of various nitrogen substrates on growth of Chryseobacterium sp. R31. Ammonium chloride (filled squares), sodium nitrate (filled triangles), and sodium nitrite (filled circles). Error bars represent one SD (n = 9). (b) Influence of various nitrogen substrates on nitrogen removal by Chryseobacterium sp. R31. Ammonium chloride (filled squares), sodium nitrate (filled triangles), and sodium nitrite (filled circles). Error bars represent one SD (n = 9).
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fig5: (a) Influence of various nitrogen substrates on growth of Chryseobacterium sp. R31. Ammonium chloride (filled squares), sodium nitrate (filled triangles), and sodium nitrite (filled circles). Error bars represent one SD (n = 9). (b) Influence of various nitrogen substrates on nitrogen removal by Chryseobacterium sp. R31. Ammonium chloride (filled squares), sodium nitrate (filled triangles), and sodium nitrite (filled circles). Error bars represent one SD (n = 9).

Mentions: The influence of various nitrogen substrates on growth of isolate R31 and nitrogen removal is shown in Figures 5(a) and 5(b), respectively. It is evident from the figures that similar growth was attained with ammonium chloride, nitrate, and nitrite as substrates. Nitrogen removal was nearly alike for all three substrates. Thus, the isolate was capable of utilizing ammonium, nitrate, and nitrite as nitrogen substrates and heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification was independent of the nature of the nitrogen substrate. Growth with nitrite was sufficient, and 75% nitrite was utilized. It appeared that the enzymes required for ammonium utilization such as ammonium monooxygenase and hydroxylamine oxidoreductase as well as nitrite/nitrate reductase required for nitrate utilization were all active when the organism was fed with these substrates. This experiment further confirmed the nitrification and denitrification ability of the isolate. Aerobic denitrification occurring during ammonium removal by R31 demonstrated by utilization of both nitrate and nitrite was similar to the process occurring in Agrobacterium strain LAD9 as reported by Chen and Ni [9]. The nitrate removal rate was 1.0 mg/L/h which is higher than that recorded for Rhodococcus (0.93 mg/L/h) as reported by Chen et al. [10]. Aerobic denitrifiers utilize nitrite by intracellular assimilation or extracellular reduction pathways. Similar to the observations for Klebsiella pneumoniae [16], concomitant cell density increase was noted in our experiments along with consumption of nitrite indicating that extracellular reduction had occurred. Aerobic denitrification ability of strain R31 was confirmed by the positive results obtained in the nitrate and nitrite reductase assays (these enzyme activities were absent in the type of strain of C. haifense).


Simultaneous heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification by Chryseobacterium sp. R31 isolated from abattoir wastewater.

Kundu P, Pramanik A, Dasgupta A, Mukherjee S, Mukherjee J - Biomed Res Int (2014)

(a) Influence of various nitrogen substrates on growth of Chryseobacterium sp. R31. Ammonium chloride (filled squares), sodium nitrate (filled triangles), and sodium nitrite (filled circles). Error bars represent one SD (n = 9). (b) Influence of various nitrogen substrates on nitrogen removal by Chryseobacterium sp. R31. Ammonium chloride (filled squares), sodium nitrate (filled triangles), and sodium nitrite (filled circles). Error bars represent one SD (n = 9).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4060765&req=5

fig5: (a) Influence of various nitrogen substrates on growth of Chryseobacterium sp. R31. Ammonium chloride (filled squares), sodium nitrate (filled triangles), and sodium nitrite (filled circles). Error bars represent one SD (n = 9). (b) Influence of various nitrogen substrates on nitrogen removal by Chryseobacterium sp. R31. Ammonium chloride (filled squares), sodium nitrate (filled triangles), and sodium nitrite (filled circles). Error bars represent one SD (n = 9).
Mentions: The influence of various nitrogen substrates on growth of isolate R31 and nitrogen removal is shown in Figures 5(a) and 5(b), respectively. It is evident from the figures that similar growth was attained with ammonium chloride, nitrate, and nitrite as substrates. Nitrogen removal was nearly alike for all three substrates. Thus, the isolate was capable of utilizing ammonium, nitrate, and nitrite as nitrogen substrates and heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification was independent of the nature of the nitrogen substrate. Growth with nitrite was sufficient, and 75% nitrite was utilized. It appeared that the enzymes required for ammonium utilization such as ammonium monooxygenase and hydroxylamine oxidoreductase as well as nitrite/nitrate reductase required for nitrate utilization were all active when the organism was fed with these substrates. This experiment further confirmed the nitrification and denitrification ability of the isolate. Aerobic denitrification occurring during ammonium removal by R31 demonstrated by utilization of both nitrate and nitrite was similar to the process occurring in Agrobacterium strain LAD9 as reported by Chen and Ni [9]. The nitrate removal rate was 1.0 mg/L/h which is higher than that recorded for Rhodococcus (0.93 mg/L/h) as reported by Chen et al. [10]. Aerobic denitrifiers utilize nitrite by intracellular assimilation or extracellular reduction pathways. Similar to the observations for Klebsiella pneumoniae [16], concomitant cell density increase was noted in our experiments along with consumption of nitrite indicating that extracellular reduction had occurred. Aerobic denitrification ability of strain R31 was confirmed by the positive results obtained in the nitrate and nitrite reductase assays (these enzyme activities were absent in the type of strain of C. haifense).

Bottom Line: From an initial COD value of 583.0 mg/L, 95.54% was removed whilst, from a starting NH4 (+)-N concentration of 55.7 mg/L, 95.87% was removed after 48 h contact.Molecular phylogenetic identification, supported by chemotaxonomic and physiological properties, assigned R31 as a close relative of Chryseobacterium haifense.This is the first report on concomitant carbon oxidation, nitrification, and denitrification in the genus Chryseobacterium and the associated kinetic coefficients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Civil Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032, India.

ABSTRACT
A heterotrophic carbon utilizing microbe (R31) capable of simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND) was isolated from wastewater of an Indian slaughterhouse. From an initial COD value of 583.0 mg/L, 95.54% was removed whilst, from a starting NH4 (+)-N concentration of 55.7 mg/L, 95.87% was removed after 48 h contact. The concentrations of the intermediates hydroxylamine, nitrite, and nitrate were low, thus ensuring nitrogen removal. Aerobic denitrification occurring during ammonium removal by R31 was confirmed by utilization of both nitrate and nitrite as nitrogen substrates. Glucose and succinate were superior while acetate and citrate were poor substrates for nitrogen removal. Molecular phylogenetic identification, supported by chemotaxonomic and physiological properties, assigned R31 as a close relative of Chryseobacterium haifense. The NH4 (+)-N utilization rate and growth of strain R31 were found to be higher at C/N = 10 in comparison to those achieved with C/N ratios of 5 and 20. Monod kinetic coefficients, half saturation concentration (K s ), maximum rate of substrate utilization (k), yield coefficient, (Y) and endogenous decay coefficient (K d ) indicated potential application of R31 in large-scale SND process. This is the first report on concomitant carbon oxidation, nitrification, and denitrification in the genus Chryseobacterium and the associated kinetic coefficients.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus